title

Mom Enough: Parenting tips, research-based advice + a few personal confessions!

mother-daughter co-hosts Dr. Marti Erickson & Dr.

10
Followers
29
Plays
Mom Enough: Parenting tips, research-based advice + a few personal confessions!
Mom Enough: Parenting tips, research-based advice + a few personal confessions!

Mom Enough: Parenting tips, research-based advice + a few personal confessions!

mother-daughter co-hosts Dr. Marti Erickson & Dr.

10
Followers
29
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

Dr. Marti Erickson, developmental psychologist and her daughter Dr. Erin Erickson, women’s health nurse practitioner and specialist in maternal-child health, use research-based information and a few personal confessions as they and their guests discuss what it means to be “mom enough.”

Latest Episodes

Helping Children with ASD Improve Regulation and Focus at Home and School: A Conversation with Kate Biederman from St. David’s Center for Child & Family Development

Children with ASD often become dysregulated, both physically and emotionally, when they feel overstimulated by things like noise, clutter or demands to move too quickly from one activity to another. But, because each child is unique, parents need to be detectives, figuring out what will help their child become regulated and able to focus on what is important. As occupational therapist Kate Biederman describes in this Mom Enough episode, some children respond well to deep touch, while others find that aversive. Many children feel calm after they engage in what Kate calls "heavy work," which includes climbing on a jungle gym or jumping on a mini-trampoline. While noise can be dysregulating, music with certain rhythms can be regulating and organizing. An uncluttered home environment and an unhurried schedule can help almost any child be calmer and more focused. As adults and children discover together what works, children ideally can build the self-awareness and independence to do what...

28 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Helping Children with ASD Improve Regulation and Focus at Home and School: A Conversation with Kate Biederman from St. David’s Center for Child & Family Development

Living More by Doing Less: A Chat with author Tonya Dalton on the Joy of Missing Out

If you are like many moms, you probably have a story you tell yourself about what a “good mom” does. And trying to live up to that story probably leaves you feeling unfulfilled and unproductive at the end of most days, asking yourself, “How can I be so busy and have so little to show for it?” Perhaps you need to live more by doing less and find the joy of missing out! Tonya Dalton, author and productivity expert, cuts to the chase on these issues in her book The Joy of Missing Out and in her conversation with Marti and Erin, offering practical tips on how to find your purpose (your North star!), clarify your priorities and simplify your life. Here key take-aways include Erin’s favorite, “Every time you say yes, you are saying no to something else,” and Marti’s mantra, “To be truly productive, we need to give our brains a little space to play and explore.” Listen to this lively conversation and then reflect on what you can choose to miss out on so you can savor those things...

28 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Living More by Doing Less: A Chat with author Tonya Dalton on the Joy of Missing Out

Positive Parenting Strategies: Small Changes with Big Results

As parents, our days are filled with little challenges -- making sure our kids get out the door on time for school, getting siblings to play well together, helping a toddler accept “no” without a tantrum, persuading teens to get off the phone and do their homework. Dr. Alan Kazdin, professor and director of the Parenting Center at Yale, has spent his career helping parents whose children are especially defiant and challenging. But his latest book, The Everyday Parenting Toolkit, brings his proven methods to bear on the challenges all children and parents face. He joined Marti & Erin in this week’s show for a lively discussion, offering a positive parenting framework you will want to try with your own children. In this week’s Mom Enough show, Dr. Alan Kazdin from Yale University, discusses his ABC approach to handling parenting challenges (A for antecedents, B for behavior, C for consequences). What challenging behaviors would you like to change with your child? What steps could ...

22 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Positive Parenting Strategies: Small Changes with Big Results

How College Makes or Breaks Us: A Conversation with Author Paul Tough on How Young Americans Navigate the Complex Processes of Applying for and Attending College and Moving on to Successful Adult Lives

Best-selling author Paul Tough digs deeply into big ideas, and that certainly is true in his latest book, The Years that Matter Most: How College Makes or Breaks Us. Paul spent six years exploring colleges in 21 states, including sitting through freshman calculus at the University of Texas and a philosophy class at Princeton. He interviewed faculty, SAT tutors and students from all walks of life, concluding that higher education as an engine of social mobility is breaking down. Paul brings these issues to life through the chronicles of first-generation students trying to overcome barriers to admission to prestigious schools, community college students hoping to attain jobs that will pay the bills, and well-to-do students seeing their teen years defined by the anxiety that comes with intense parental pressure, high-stakes tests and frenetic schedules of résumé-building activities.He joins Marti & Erin this week to discuss highlights of what he learned and to offer action steps for ...

29 MINSEP 16
Comments
How College Makes or Breaks Us: A Conversation with Author Paul Tough on How Young Americans Navigate the Complex Processes of Applying for and Attending College and Moving on to Successful Adult Lives

Moms’ Roles, Dads’ Roles and the Myth of Equal Partnership: A Conversation with Psychologist and Author Darcy Lockman

Before you became a parent, how did you envision the way you and your partner would handle parenting responsibilities and household management tasks to form an equal partnership? To what extent does the actual division of labor match your vision or expectations? If you’re like most families, there is a notable gap between expectations and reality, and that may be fine with you – or not! Clinical psychologist and author Darcy Lockman, motivated in part by personal experience, has delved deeply into this topic and brings what she has learned to this fascinating and important conversation with Marti & Erin. She explores assumptions about hormones and of parenting, cultural trends in intensive mothering, peaks and plateaus in active fathering and the often invisible work of the “mental load” of parenting. Most of all, Darcy urges couples to talk together about how they want to parent, especially before becoming parents. But, as Marti & Erin note, if you didn’t start then, start now...

26 MINSEP 9
Comments
Moms’ Roles, Dads’ Roles and the Myth of Equal Partnership: A Conversation with Psychologist and Author Darcy Lockman

Guiding Teenage Girls to a Healthy Adulthood: Insights and Tips from Dr. Lisa Damour

You probably remember the challenges of your own adolescence – on-again, off-again friendships, emotional highs and lows, worries about body image, anxiety about school, life and love. In today’s fast-paced world – and with both the opportunities and threats of ever-present technology – the stakes seem even higher for our daughters. In her book Untangled, psychologist Lisa Damour, mom of two daughters and Director of Laurel School’s Center for Research on Girls, provides a rich framework for understanding the transitions teen girls face on the path to adulthood. Don’t miss her wisdom and practical guidance in this Mom Enough interview! What are some of the major challenges your adolescent daughter confronts today? How do these issues tie to the seven transitions Lisa Damour described in this Mom Enough discussion? How have you tried to guide your daughter through these challenges and how might you improve your response? Related Resources: For Untangled, click here. For a discu...

32 MINSEP 2
Comments
Guiding Teenage Girls to a Healthy Adulthood: Insights and Tips from Dr. Lisa Damour

Smart, but Scattered: Helping Children and Teens Build the Executive Skills to Succeed in School and Life

Being smart is one ingredient for school success. But, without the ability to stay focused, develop a realistic plan for completing tasks and organizing yourself and your stuff, being smart may not get you very far. It is those “executive skills” that are the focus of Dr. Peg Dawson’s work, particularly with children and teens who struggle with attention problems. Peg also is co-author of three books on the subject, dealing separately with children, teens and adults who are Smart, but Scattered. Tune in for practical ways to help kids build executive skills, as well as some true confessions from Marti & Erin about their “smart, but scattered” family members! How do your children and other family members (including yourself) measure up on the executive skills discussed in this Mom Enough interview? How do you put into practice Dr. Dawson’s tips (e.g. breaking down tasks, establishing routines, creating clean spaces and using incentives)? What could you do better? Related Resour...

26 MINAUG 26
Comments
Smart, but Scattered: Helping Children and Teens Build the Executive Skills to Succeed in School and Life

Talking about Tough Topics with Your Children: Helpful Tips from Psychologist Kate Rickord for Having Difficult Conversations

Whether it’s news accounts of natural disasters or terrorism, sexually loaded images on TV or marital conflict in our own homes, many things in our children’s daily lives compel us to have conversations that feel difficult and uncomfortable. What can children manage or comprehend at different ages? What words should we use – and what tone should we strive for – when children ask questions that make us squirm? How do we help children feel safe and secure while still being honest about the hard things that can and do happen in the real world? Psychologist Kate Rickord from St. David’s Center for Child & Family Development joins Marti for a thoughtful conversation about addressing tough topics with your children, whatever their ages. *Encore show,originally posted 7/11/16 What topics do you find most uncomfortable to discuss with your children? What did you find helpful in this Mom Enough discussion? Related Resources: For St. David’s Center, click here. For St. David’s Center’...

29 MINAUG 19
Comments
Talking about Tough Topics with Your Children: Helpful Tips from Psychologist Kate Rickord for Having Difficult Conversations

Helping Children Deal with a Family Member’s Substance Use: A Message of Resilience from Helene Photias of Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

When a parent or other key adult in a family is dealing with substance abuse or addiction, children are affected in many ways. Their trust and security are undermined when parents are unable to provide the consistent, sensitive care children need and deserve. Children may fear the erratic, unpredictable behavior that is typical of people with substance abuse issues. Often, children cope by taking on the unspoken rules of “don’t talk, don’t trust, don’t feel,” at great expense to their health and wellbeing. But, as this week’s guest, Helene Photias, knows, children begin to heal when adults talk to them candidly and in developmentally appropriate ways about what their problem is, why they are going to treatment and what they expect to learn there. Children also thrive when they are supported and encouraged to say how they feel and to learn that it is safe to break the rules of silence and tell the adults around them what they need. This is a rich and important conversation you ...

35 MINAUG 12
Comments
Helping Children Deal with a Family Member’s Substance Use: A Message of Resilience from Helene Photias of Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

How Young Children Think about Relationships: Insights from Research with Dr. Narges Afshordi of the University of Minnesota’s College of Education & Human Development

Long before children can speak and tell us what they know, they are watching us and others and beginning to develop expectations about how people will behave in certain situations. For example, infants who have a secure attachment with their mothers show surprise when a very simple animated video image leaves a smaller, similar image who seems to be crying. They have come to expect that mothers will not just wander off and leave their child alone. Very young children also are learning, through a process called social referencing, who is safe and who is dangerous. And they are making discoveries about who will become friends and what qualities friends show. Dr. Narges Afshordi, who received her Ph.D. from Harvard in 2018 and is now a post-doc in the U of M’s Institute of Child Development, joins Marti & Erin to discuss these fascinating findings on how very young children work out their understanding of relationships. We think you will be as amazed as Marti & Erin were by what is go...

30 MINAUG 5
Comments
How Young Children Think about Relationships: Insights from Research with Dr. Narges Afshordi of the University of Minnesota’s College of Education & Human Development

Latest Episodes

Helping Children with ASD Improve Regulation and Focus at Home and School: A Conversation with Kate Biederman from St. David’s Center for Child & Family Development

Children with ASD often become dysregulated, both physically and emotionally, when they feel overstimulated by things like noise, clutter or demands to move too quickly from one activity to another. But, because each child is unique, parents need to be detectives, figuring out what will help their child become regulated and able to focus on what is important. As occupational therapist Kate Biederman describes in this Mom Enough episode, some children respond well to deep touch, while others find that aversive. Many children feel calm after they engage in what Kate calls "heavy work," which includes climbing on a jungle gym or jumping on a mini-trampoline. While noise can be dysregulating, music with certain rhythms can be regulating and organizing. An uncluttered home environment and an unhurried schedule can help almost any child be calmer and more focused. As adults and children discover together what works, children ideally can build the self-awareness and independence to do what...

28 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Helping Children with ASD Improve Regulation and Focus at Home and School: A Conversation with Kate Biederman from St. David’s Center for Child & Family Development

Living More by Doing Less: A Chat with author Tonya Dalton on the Joy of Missing Out

If you are like many moms, you probably have a story you tell yourself about what a “good mom” does. And trying to live up to that story probably leaves you feeling unfulfilled and unproductive at the end of most days, asking yourself, “How can I be so busy and have so little to show for it?” Perhaps you need to live more by doing less and find the joy of missing out! Tonya Dalton, author and productivity expert, cuts to the chase on these issues in her book The Joy of Missing Out and in her conversation with Marti and Erin, offering practical tips on how to find your purpose (your North star!), clarify your priorities and simplify your life. Here key take-aways include Erin’s favorite, “Every time you say yes, you are saying no to something else,” and Marti’s mantra, “To be truly productive, we need to give our brains a little space to play and explore.” Listen to this lively conversation and then reflect on what you can choose to miss out on so you can savor those things...

28 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Living More by Doing Less: A Chat with author Tonya Dalton on the Joy of Missing Out

Positive Parenting Strategies: Small Changes with Big Results

As parents, our days are filled with little challenges -- making sure our kids get out the door on time for school, getting siblings to play well together, helping a toddler accept “no” without a tantrum, persuading teens to get off the phone and do their homework. Dr. Alan Kazdin, professor and director of the Parenting Center at Yale, has spent his career helping parents whose children are especially defiant and challenging. But his latest book, The Everyday Parenting Toolkit, brings his proven methods to bear on the challenges all children and parents face. He joined Marti & Erin in this week’s show for a lively discussion, offering a positive parenting framework you will want to try with your own children. In this week’s Mom Enough show, Dr. Alan Kazdin from Yale University, discusses his ABC approach to handling parenting challenges (A for antecedents, B for behavior, C for consequences). What challenging behaviors would you like to change with your child? What steps could ...

22 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Positive Parenting Strategies: Small Changes with Big Results

How College Makes or Breaks Us: A Conversation with Author Paul Tough on How Young Americans Navigate the Complex Processes of Applying for and Attending College and Moving on to Successful Adult Lives

Best-selling author Paul Tough digs deeply into big ideas, and that certainly is true in his latest book, The Years that Matter Most: How College Makes or Breaks Us. Paul spent six years exploring colleges in 21 states, including sitting through freshman calculus at the University of Texas and a philosophy class at Princeton. He interviewed faculty, SAT tutors and students from all walks of life, concluding that higher education as an engine of social mobility is breaking down. Paul brings these issues to life through the chronicles of first-generation students trying to overcome barriers to admission to prestigious schools, community college students hoping to attain jobs that will pay the bills, and well-to-do students seeing their teen years defined by the anxiety that comes with intense parental pressure, high-stakes tests and frenetic schedules of résumé-building activities.He joins Marti & Erin this week to discuss highlights of what he learned and to offer action steps for ...

29 MINSEP 16
Comments
How College Makes or Breaks Us: A Conversation with Author Paul Tough on How Young Americans Navigate the Complex Processes of Applying for and Attending College and Moving on to Successful Adult Lives

Moms’ Roles, Dads’ Roles and the Myth of Equal Partnership: A Conversation with Psychologist and Author Darcy Lockman

Before you became a parent, how did you envision the way you and your partner would handle parenting responsibilities and household management tasks to form an equal partnership? To what extent does the actual division of labor match your vision or expectations? If you’re like most families, there is a notable gap between expectations and reality, and that may be fine with you – or not! Clinical psychologist and author Darcy Lockman, motivated in part by personal experience, has delved deeply into this topic and brings what she has learned to this fascinating and important conversation with Marti & Erin. She explores assumptions about hormones and of parenting, cultural trends in intensive mothering, peaks and plateaus in active fathering and the often invisible work of the “mental load” of parenting. Most of all, Darcy urges couples to talk together about how they want to parent, especially before becoming parents. But, as Marti & Erin note, if you didn’t start then, start now...

26 MINSEP 9
Comments
Moms’ Roles, Dads’ Roles and the Myth of Equal Partnership: A Conversation with Psychologist and Author Darcy Lockman

Guiding Teenage Girls to a Healthy Adulthood: Insights and Tips from Dr. Lisa Damour

You probably remember the challenges of your own adolescence – on-again, off-again friendships, emotional highs and lows, worries about body image, anxiety about school, life and love. In today’s fast-paced world – and with both the opportunities and threats of ever-present technology – the stakes seem even higher for our daughters. In her book Untangled, psychologist Lisa Damour, mom of two daughters and Director of Laurel School’s Center for Research on Girls, provides a rich framework for understanding the transitions teen girls face on the path to adulthood. Don’t miss her wisdom and practical guidance in this Mom Enough interview! What are some of the major challenges your adolescent daughter confronts today? How do these issues tie to the seven transitions Lisa Damour described in this Mom Enough discussion? How have you tried to guide your daughter through these challenges and how might you improve your response? Related Resources: For Untangled, click here. For a discu...

32 MINSEP 2
Comments
Guiding Teenage Girls to a Healthy Adulthood: Insights and Tips from Dr. Lisa Damour

Smart, but Scattered: Helping Children and Teens Build the Executive Skills to Succeed in School and Life

Being smart is one ingredient for school success. But, without the ability to stay focused, develop a realistic plan for completing tasks and organizing yourself and your stuff, being smart may not get you very far. It is those “executive skills” that are the focus of Dr. Peg Dawson’s work, particularly with children and teens who struggle with attention problems. Peg also is co-author of three books on the subject, dealing separately with children, teens and adults who are Smart, but Scattered. Tune in for practical ways to help kids build executive skills, as well as some true confessions from Marti & Erin about their “smart, but scattered” family members! How do your children and other family members (including yourself) measure up on the executive skills discussed in this Mom Enough interview? How do you put into practice Dr. Dawson’s tips (e.g. breaking down tasks, establishing routines, creating clean spaces and using incentives)? What could you do better? Related Resour...

26 MINAUG 26
Comments
Smart, but Scattered: Helping Children and Teens Build the Executive Skills to Succeed in School and Life

Talking about Tough Topics with Your Children: Helpful Tips from Psychologist Kate Rickord for Having Difficult Conversations

Whether it’s news accounts of natural disasters or terrorism, sexually loaded images on TV or marital conflict in our own homes, many things in our children’s daily lives compel us to have conversations that feel difficult and uncomfortable. What can children manage or comprehend at different ages? What words should we use – and what tone should we strive for – when children ask questions that make us squirm? How do we help children feel safe and secure while still being honest about the hard things that can and do happen in the real world? Psychologist Kate Rickord from St. David’s Center for Child & Family Development joins Marti for a thoughtful conversation about addressing tough topics with your children, whatever their ages. *Encore show,originally posted 7/11/16 What topics do you find most uncomfortable to discuss with your children? What did you find helpful in this Mom Enough discussion? Related Resources: For St. David’s Center, click here. For St. David’s Center’...

29 MINAUG 19
Comments
Talking about Tough Topics with Your Children: Helpful Tips from Psychologist Kate Rickord for Having Difficult Conversations

Helping Children Deal with a Family Member’s Substance Use: A Message of Resilience from Helene Photias of Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

When a parent or other key adult in a family is dealing with substance abuse or addiction, children are affected in many ways. Their trust and security are undermined when parents are unable to provide the consistent, sensitive care children need and deserve. Children may fear the erratic, unpredictable behavior that is typical of people with substance abuse issues. Often, children cope by taking on the unspoken rules of “don’t talk, don’t trust, don’t feel,” at great expense to their health and wellbeing. But, as this week’s guest, Helene Photias, knows, children begin to heal when adults talk to them candidly and in developmentally appropriate ways about what their problem is, why they are going to treatment and what they expect to learn there. Children also thrive when they are supported and encouraged to say how they feel and to learn that it is safe to break the rules of silence and tell the adults around them what they need. This is a rich and important conversation you ...

35 MINAUG 12
Comments
Helping Children Deal with a Family Member’s Substance Use: A Message of Resilience from Helene Photias of Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

How Young Children Think about Relationships: Insights from Research with Dr. Narges Afshordi of the University of Minnesota’s College of Education & Human Development

Long before children can speak and tell us what they know, they are watching us and others and beginning to develop expectations about how people will behave in certain situations. For example, infants who have a secure attachment with their mothers show surprise when a very simple animated video image leaves a smaller, similar image who seems to be crying. They have come to expect that mothers will not just wander off and leave their child alone. Very young children also are learning, through a process called social referencing, who is safe and who is dangerous. And they are making discoveries about who will become friends and what qualities friends show. Dr. Narges Afshordi, who received her Ph.D. from Harvard in 2018 and is now a post-doc in the U of M’s Institute of Child Development, joins Marti & Erin to discuss these fascinating findings on how very young children work out their understanding of relationships. We think you will be as amazed as Marti & Erin were by what is go...

30 MINAUG 5
Comments
How Young Children Think about Relationships: Insights from Research with Dr. Narges Afshordi of the University of Minnesota’s College of Education & Human Development