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Naked Scientists, In Short Special Editions Podcast

The Naked Scientists

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Followers
153
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Naked Scientists, In Short Special Editions Podcast
Naked Scientists, In Short Special Editions Podcast

Naked Scientists, In Short Special Editions Podcast

The Naked Scientists

30
Followers
153
Plays
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About Us

Probing the weird, wacky and spectacular, the Naked Scientists Special Editions are special one-off scientific reports, investigations and interviews on cutting-edge topics by the Naked Scientists team.

Latest Episodes

Why planting trees isn't always a good idea

This is a response to a story we covered earlier this year about planting trees for climate change. A study in the journal Science claimed that the Earth has space for an extra billion hectares of trees; and if they were planted, it would lock away enough carbon dioxide to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius by 2050. Since then, Science has published not one - not two - but five comments and rebuttals to the original paper. They criticise various aspects of the method and results; one in particular was authored by almost fifty scientists, and said that the available area for trees was... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

7 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Why planting trees isn't always a good idea

Lakes, carbon and microbes: a hidden world

While forests do a great job of taking carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, as soon as the trees decompose, all that carbon goes straight back up again. And a new study has investigated how that decomposition works inside freshwater lakes. Scientists have found that what was traditionally just called "carbon" in a lake is actually a hugely diverse mix of different carbon-based molecules, which supports an equally diverse mix of microbes. And the more diverse everything is, the more greenhouse gases these lakes seem to pump out - which could be bad news if different species of trees react... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

4 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Lakes, carbon and microbes: a hidden world

Food micronutrient-protecting capsules

If you have access to a healthy, balanced diet, hopefully you'll be getting adequate supply of micronutrients. Going without can lead to serious health consequences. Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of preventable blindness in kids globally, and is a major public health issue in some parts of the world. Fortifying foods is one solution, but things like heat, UV, and moisture can degrade the vitamins and minerals in the food, leaving little left for absorption by the body. This week, scientists from MIT announced that they've made a dissolvable polymer capsule which can shield... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

4 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Food micronutrient-protecting capsules

Staphylococcus aureus biofilm vaccine

A vaccine that can protect against infection with the skin bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, which causes everything from wound and joint infections to impetigo and pneumonia, has been developed by scientists in the US. Apart from increasing rates of antibiotic resistance, what makes Staph infections hard to treat is that the microbes surround themselves with a slimy layer called a biofilm that protects them from the immune system and antimicrobial drugs. As she explains to Chris Smith, to prevent the bugs being able to do this in the first place, Janette Harro looked at what proteins the... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

5 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Staphylococcus aureus biofilm vaccine

Bird societies

You might think we are special as humans for forming societies with complex structures. But we are not actually so different from other species in this regard. It was believed that complex social structures were a trait of large mammals only - but a recent study has shown that birds can form complex societies too. Amalia Thomas spoke to Danai Papageorgiou, who has been studying the social structure of a specific type of bird in Kenya in Africa... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

5 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Bird societies

Voyager 2: leaving the Solar System

In recent months the satellite Voyager 2, launched in 1977, became the second man-made object to escape from our Solar System and begin its journey into interstellar space. We know it's done that because it's crossed the heliopause, a bubble made by particles, called a plasma, that stream off the Sun and surround our Solar system. To learn more about this Adam Murphy spoke to Du Toit Strauss from North West University in South Africa... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

4 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Voyager 2: leaving the Solar System

Oil wastewater makes earthquakes stronger

Oil production has multiple environmentally-devastating consequences - including creating of billions of gallons of salty, chemical-filled wastewater. Typically, companies dispose of this wastewater by pumping it deep underground. But a growing body of evidence shows that this pumping causes 'injection-induced earthquakes', most notably the Jones earthquake swarm: thousands of earthquakes that have occurred in Oklahoma over the last ten years. And a new study demonstrates that the fluid properties of wastewater make earthquakes stronger and more common where disposal is concentrated. Matthew... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

5 MINNOV 7
Comments
Oil wastewater makes earthquakes stronger

Glass recognises numbers just by looking

We have smartphones, smart watches, even smart fridges. But now, from a paper published in the journal Photonics Research, we could be seeing smart glass. Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison created a piece of glass that can mimic machine visual perception, basically how smart phones recognize your face to unlock the device, without needing any camera sensors, computer chips, or even a power supply! All the glass needs is light and tiny imperfections called "bubbles" within the glass to direct that light appropriately. Right now it has the capability to tell, in real time,... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

4 MINNOV 4
Comments
Glass recognises numbers just by looking

How many new mutations from Mum and Dad?

This month, join Chris Smith to hear how sleep deprivation sends your endocannabinoids skyrocketing and triggers a tendency to binge, how many new genetic mutations you inherit from your parents, the gene for behaviour that turned out to be nothing of the sort, what good and bad learners have in common with youTube influencers, and from online collective whinge to paper in eLife: the careers of newly appointed PIs. Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

35 MINOCT 31
Comments
How many new mutations from Mum and Dad?

Brain changes in obese children

One in five UK children are obese. The biological and social factors behind this are complex, but the long term consequences range from cardiovascular and liver disease to diabetes. Now, according to a new study, it may even affect the development of a child's brain too, with overweight children showing a thinner cortex in the parts of the brain concerned with self-control and decision-making. Speaking with Chris Smith, Cambridge University neuroscientist Lisa Ronan... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

4 MINOCT 29
Comments
Brain changes in obese children

Latest Episodes

Why planting trees isn't always a good idea

This is a response to a story we covered earlier this year about planting trees for climate change. A study in the journal Science claimed that the Earth has space for an extra billion hectares of trees; and if they were planted, it would lock away enough carbon dioxide to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius by 2050. Since then, Science has published not one - not two - but five comments and rebuttals to the original paper. They criticise various aspects of the method and results; one in particular was authored by almost fifty scientists, and said that the available area for trees was... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

7 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Why planting trees isn't always a good idea

Lakes, carbon and microbes: a hidden world

While forests do a great job of taking carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, as soon as the trees decompose, all that carbon goes straight back up again. And a new study has investigated how that decomposition works inside freshwater lakes. Scientists have found that what was traditionally just called "carbon" in a lake is actually a hugely diverse mix of different carbon-based molecules, which supports an equally diverse mix of microbes. And the more diverse everything is, the more greenhouse gases these lakes seem to pump out - which could be bad news if different species of trees react... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

4 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Lakes, carbon and microbes: a hidden world

Food micronutrient-protecting capsules

If you have access to a healthy, balanced diet, hopefully you'll be getting adequate supply of micronutrients. Going without can lead to serious health consequences. Vitamin A deficiency is the leading cause of preventable blindness in kids globally, and is a major public health issue in some parts of the world. Fortifying foods is one solution, but things like heat, UV, and moisture can degrade the vitamins and minerals in the food, leaving little left for absorption by the body. This week, scientists from MIT announced that they've made a dissolvable polymer capsule which can shield... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

4 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Food micronutrient-protecting capsules

Staphylococcus aureus biofilm vaccine

A vaccine that can protect against infection with the skin bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, which causes everything from wound and joint infections to impetigo and pneumonia, has been developed by scientists in the US. Apart from increasing rates of antibiotic resistance, what makes Staph infections hard to treat is that the microbes surround themselves with a slimy layer called a biofilm that protects them from the immune system and antimicrobial drugs. As she explains to Chris Smith, to prevent the bugs being able to do this in the first place, Janette Harro looked at what proteins the... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

5 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Staphylococcus aureus biofilm vaccine

Bird societies

You might think we are special as humans for forming societies with complex structures. But we are not actually so different from other species in this regard. It was believed that complex social structures were a trait of large mammals only - but a recent study has shown that birds can form complex societies too. Amalia Thomas spoke to Danai Papageorgiou, who has been studying the social structure of a specific type of bird in Kenya in Africa... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

5 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Bird societies

Voyager 2: leaving the Solar System

In recent months the satellite Voyager 2, launched in 1977, became the second man-made object to escape from our Solar System and begin its journey into interstellar space. We know it's done that because it's crossed the heliopause, a bubble made by particles, called a plasma, that stream off the Sun and surround our Solar system. To learn more about this Adam Murphy spoke to Du Toit Strauss from North West University in South Africa... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

4 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Voyager 2: leaving the Solar System

Oil wastewater makes earthquakes stronger

Oil production has multiple environmentally-devastating consequences - including creating of billions of gallons of salty, chemical-filled wastewater. Typically, companies dispose of this wastewater by pumping it deep underground. But a growing body of evidence shows that this pumping causes 'injection-induced earthquakes', most notably the Jones earthquake swarm: thousands of earthquakes that have occurred in Oklahoma over the last ten years. And a new study demonstrates that the fluid properties of wastewater make earthquakes stronger and more common where disposal is concentrated. Matthew... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

5 MINNOV 7
Comments
Oil wastewater makes earthquakes stronger

Glass recognises numbers just by looking

We have smartphones, smart watches, even smart fridges. But now, from a paper published in the journal Photonics Research, we could be seeing smart glass. Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison created a piece of glass that can mimic machine visual perception, basically how smart phones recognize your face to unlock the device, without needing any camera sensors, computer chips, or even a power supply! All the glass needs is light and tiny imperfections called "bubbles" within the glass to direct that light appropriately. Right now it has the capability to tell, in real time,... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

4 MINNOV 4
Comments
Glass recognises numbers just by looking

How many new mutations from Mum and Dad?

This month, join Chris Smith to hear how sleep deprivation sends your endocannabinoids skyrocketing and triggers a tendency to binge, how many new genetic mutations you inherit from your parents, the gene for behaviour that turned out to be nothing of the sort, what good and bad learners have in common with youTube influencers, and from online collective whinge to paper in eLife: the careers of newly appointed PIs. Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

35 MINOCT 31
Comments
How many new mutations from Mum and Dad?

Brain changes in obese children

One in five UK children are obese. The biological and social factors behind this are complex, but the long term consequences range from cardiovascular and liver disease to diabetes. Now, according to a new study, it may even affect the development of a child's brain too, with overweight children showing a thinner cortex in the parts of the brain concerned with self-control and decision-making. Speaking with Chris Smith, Cambridge University neuroscientist Lisa Ronan... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

4 MINOCT 29
Comments
Brain changes in obese children
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