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Radiolab

WNYC Studios

4.7K
Followers
13.3K
Plays
Radiolab
Radiolab

Radiolab

WNYC Studios

4.7K
Followers
13.3K
Plays
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Radiolab

Latest Episodes

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss

Today onRadiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series,Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jadgoes back up the mountain to visit Dolly’s actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rainby the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad’s first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate.

45 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss

Songs that Cross Borders

Coming off our adventures with Square Dancing, and Jad's dive into the world ofDolly Parton, we look back at one our favorites.About a decade ago, we found out that American country music is surprisingpopular in places like Zimbabwe, Thailand, and South Africa. Aaron Fox, an anthropologist of music at Columbia University, tells usthat quite simply, country music tells a story that a lot of us get. Then, intrepid international reporterGregory Warner takes us along on one of hisvery first forays into another country, where he discovers an unexpected taste of home. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate. Aaron Foxes book:Real Country: Music And Language In Working-Class Culture Gregory Warner's podcast Rough Translation

29 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Songs that Cross Borders

Birdie in the Cage

People have been doing the square dance since before the Declaration of Independence. But does that mean it should be THE American folk dance? That question took us on a journey from Appalachian front porches, to dance classes across our nation, to the halls of Congress, and finally a Kansas City convention center. And along the way, we uncovered a secret history of square dancing that made us see how much of our national identity we could stuff into that square, and what it means for a dance to be of the people, by the people, and for the people. Special thanks to Jim Mayo, Claude Fowler, Paul Gifford, Jim Maczko, Jim Davis, Paul Moore, Jack Pladdys, Mary Jane Wegener, Kinsey Brooke and Connie Keener. This episode was reported by Tracie Hunte and produced by Annie McEwen, Tracie Hunte, and Matt Kielty. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate. Check out Phil Jamison's book,“Hoedowns, Reels, and Frolics: Roots and Branches of Southern Appalachian Dance” Watchthis 1948 Lucky St...

45 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Birdie in the Cage

Radiolab Presents: Dolly Parton's America

Radiolab creator and host Jad Abumrad spent the last two years following around music legend Dolly Parton, and we're here to say you should tune in! In this episode of Radiolab, we showcase the first of Jad's special series,Dolly Parton's America. In this intensely divided moment, one of the few things everyone still seems to agree on is Dolly Parton—but why? That simple question leads to a deeply personal, historical, and musical rethinking of one of America’s great icons. We begin with a simple question: How did the queen of the boob joke become a feminist icon? Helen Morales, author of “Pilgrimage to Dollywood,” gave us a stern directive – look at the lyrics!So we dive intoDolly’s discography, starting with the early period of what Dolly calls “sad ass songs” to find remarkably prescient words of female pain, slut-shaming, domestic violence, and women being locked away in asylums by cheating husbands. We explore how Dolly took the centuries-old tradition of the Appalachia...

60 MINOCT 16
Comments
Radiolab Presents: Dolly Parton's America

Silky Love

We eat eels in sushi, stews, and pasta. Eels eat anything. Also they can survive outside of water for hours and live for up to 80 years. But this slippery snake of the sea harbors an even deeper mystery, one that has tormented the minds of Aristotle and Sigmund Freud and apparently the entire country of Italy: Where do they come from? We travel from the estuaries of New York to the darkest part of the ocean in search of the limits of human knowledge. This episode was produced by Matt Kielty and Becca Bressler. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate. Further reading: Lucy Cooke's bookThe Truth about Animals! Chris Bowser's Eel ResearchProject

38 MINSEP 27
Comments
Silky Love

Tit for Tat

In the early 60s, Robert Axelrod was a math major messing around with refrigerator-sized computers. Then a dramatic global crisis made him wonder about the space between a rock and a hard place, and whether being good may be a good strategy. With help from Andrew Zolli and Steve Strogatz, we tackle the prisoner’s dilemma, a classic thought experiment, and learn about a simple strategy to navigate the waters of cooperation and betrayal. Then Axelrod, along with Stanley Weintraub, takes us back to the trenches of World War I, to the winter of 1914, and an unlikely Christmas party along the Western Front.

28 MINSEP 18
Comments
Tit for Tat

What's Left When You're Right?

More often than not, a fight is just a fight... Someone wins, someone loses. But this hour, we have a series of face-offs that shine a light on the human condition, the benefit of coming at something from a different side, and the price of being right. Special thanks to Mark Dresser for the use of his music.

63 MINSEP 6
Comments
What's Left When You're Right?

The Memory Palace

Nate DiMeo waspreoccupied with the past, and how we relate to it, from a very young age. For the last decade or so he's beenscratching this itch with The Memory Palace, a podcast he created. He doesthings very differently than we do, but his show has captured the hearts of Radiolab staffers, past and present, time and time again. So wedecided toget Nate into the studio to share a few of his episodes with usandtalk to us about how and why he does what he does. He brought usstories about the Morse Code, the draft lottery, and then he hit us with a brand new episode about a bull on trial, that bounces off a story we did pretty recently. More history on scrub bulls. Follow @thememorypalace on Twitter. This episode was produced with help from Bethel Habte. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate. Other staff favorites: Zulu Charlie Romeo Notes on an Imagined Plaque Snakes! Outliers

42 MINAUG 28
Comments
The Memory Palace

Right to be Forgotten

In an online world, that story about you lives forever. The tipsy photograph of you at the college football game? It’s up there. That news article about the political rally you were marching at? It’s up there. A DUI? That’s there, too. But what if ... it wasn’t. In Cleveland, Ohio, a group of journalists are trying out an experiment that has the potential to turn things upside down: they are unpublishing content they’ve already published. Photographs, names, entire articles. Every month or so, they get together to decide what content stays, and what content goes. On today’s episode, reporter Molly Webster goes inside the room where the decisions are being made, listening case-by-case as editors decide who, or what, gets to be deleted. It’s a story about time and memory; mistakes and second chances; and society as we know it. This episode was reported by Molly Webster, and produced by Molly Webster and Bethel Habte. Special thanks to Kathy English, David Erdos, Ed Haber, Brews...

47 MINAUG 23
Comments
Right to be Forgotten

More Perfect: Cruel and Unusual

On the inaugural episode ofMore Perfect, we explore three little words embedded in the 8th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution: “cruel and unusual.” America has long wrestled with this concept in the context of our strongest punishment, the death penalty. A majority of “we the people” (61 percent, to be exact) are in favor of having it, but inside the Supreme Court, opinions have evolved over time in surprising ways. And outside of the court, the debate drove one woman in the UK to take on the U.S. death penalty system from Europe. It also causedstates to resuscitate old methods used for executing prisoners on death row. And perhaps more than anything, it forced a conversation on what constitutes cruel and unusual punishment. Special thanks toClaire Phillips, Nina Perry, Stephanie Jenkins, Ralph Dellapiana, Byrd Pinkerton,Elisabeth Semel, Christina Spaulding, andThe Marshall Project Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate. Also! We’re working on collecting some audience fee...

58 MINAUG 9
Comments
More Perfect: Cruel and Unusual

Latest Episodes

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss

Today onRadiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series,Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jadgoes back up the mountain to visit Dolly’s actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rainby the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad’s first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate.

45 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss

Songs that Cross Borders

Coming off our adventures with Square Dancing, and Jad's dive into the world ofDolly Parton, we look back at one our favorites.About a decade ago, we found out that American country music is surprisingpopular in places like Zimbabwe, Thailand, and South Africa. Aaron Fox, an anthropologist of music at Columbia University, tells usthat quite simply, country music tells a story that a lot of us get. Then, intrepid international reporterGregory Warner takes us along on one of hisvery first forays into another country, where he discovers an unexpected taste of home. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate. Aaron Foxes book:Real Country: Music And Language In Working-Class Culture Gregory Warner's podcast Rough Translation

29 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Songs that Cross Borders

Birdie in the Cage

People have been doing the square dance since before the Declaration of Independence. But does that mean it should be THE American folk dance? That question took us on a journey from Appalachian front porches, to dance classes across our nation, to the halls of Congress, and finally a Kansas City convention center. And along the way, we uncovered a secret history of square dancing that made us see how much of our national identity we could stuff into that square, and what it means for a dance to be of the people, by the people, and for the people. Special thanks to Jim Mayo, Claude Fowler, Paul Gifford, Jim Maczko, Jim Davis, Paul Moore, Jack Pladdys, Mary Jane Wegener, Kinsey Brooke and Connie Keener. This episode was reported by Tracie Hunte and produced by Annie McEwen, Tracie Hunte, and Matt Kielty. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate. Check out Phil Jamison's book,“Hoedowns, Reels, and Frolics: Roots and Branches of Southern Appalachian Dance” Watchthis 1948 Lucky St...

45 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Birdie in the Cage

Radiolab Presents: Dolly Parton's America

Radiolab creator and host Jad Abumrad spent the last two years following around music legend Dolly Parton, and we're here to say you should tune in! In this episode of Radiolab, we showcase the first of Jad's special series,Dolly Parton's America. In this intensely divided moment, one of the few things everyone still seems to agree on is Dolly Parton—but why? That simple question leads to a deeply personal, historical, and musical rethinking of one of America’s great icons. We begin with a simple question: How did the queen of the boob joke become a feminist icon? Helen Morales, author of “Pilgrimage to Dollywood,” gave us a stern directive – look at the lyrics!So we dive intoDolly’s discography, starting with the early period of what Dolly calls “sad ass songs” to find remarkably prescient words of female pain, slut-shaming, domestic violence, and women being locked away in asylums by cheating husbands. We explore how Dolly took the centuries-old tradition of the Appalachia...

60 MINOCT 16
Comments
Radiolab Presents: Dolly Parton's America

Silky Love

We eat eels in sushi, stews, and pasta. Eels eat anything. Also they can survive outside of water for hours and live for up to 80 years. But this slippery snake of the sea harbors an even deeper mystery, one that has tormented the minds of Aristotle and Sigmund Freud and apparently the entire country of Italy: Where do they come from? We travel from the estuaries of New York to the darkest part of the ocean in search of the limits of human knowledge. This episode was produced by Matt Kielty and Becca Bressler. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate. Further reading: Lucy Cooke's bookThe Truth about Animals! Chris Bowser's Eel ResearchProject

38 MINSEP 27
Comments
Silky Love

Tit for Tat

In the early 60s, Robert Axelrod was a math major messing around with refrigerator-sized computers. Then a dramatic global crisis made him wonder about the space between a rock and a hard place, and whether being good may be a good strategy. With help from Andrew Zolli and Steve Strogatz, we tackle the prisoner’s dilemma, a classic thought experiment, and learn about a simple strategy to navigate the waters of cooperation and betrayal. Then Axelrod, along with Stanley Weintraub, takes us back to the trenches of World War I, to the winter of 1914, and an unlikely Christmas party along the Western Front.

28 MINSEP 18
Comments
Tit for Tat

What's Left When You're Right?

More often than not, a fight is just a fight... Someone wins, someone loses. But this hour, we have a series of face-offs that shine a light on the human condition, the benefit of coming at something from a different side, and the price of being right. Special thanks to Mark Dresser for the use of his music.

63 MINSEP 6
Comments
What's Left When You're Right?

The Memory Palace

Nate DiMeo waspreoccupied with the past, and how we relate to it, from a very young age. For the last decade or so he's beenscratching this itch with The Memory Palace, a podcast he created. He doesthings very differently than we do, but his show has captured the hearts of Radiolab staffers, past and present, time and time again. So wedecided toget Nate into the studio to share a few of his episodes with usandtalk to us about how and why he does what he does. He brought usstories about the Morse Code, the draft lottery, and then he hit us with a brand new episode about a bull on trial, that bounces off a story we did pretty recently. More history on scrub bulls. Follow @thememorypalace on Twitter. This episode was produced with help from Bethel Habte. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate. Other staff favorites: Zulu Charlie Romeo Notes on an Imagined Plaque Snakes! Outliers

42 MINAUG 28
Comments
The Memory Palace

Right to be Forgotten

In an online world, that story about you lives forever. The tipsy photograph of you at the college football game? It’s up there. That news article about the political rally you were marching at? It’s up there. A DUI? That’s there, too. But what if ... it wasn’t. In Cleveland, Ohio, a group of journalists are trying out an experiment that has the potential to turn things upside down: they are unpublishing content they’ve already published. Photographs, names, entire articles. Every month or so, they get together to decide what content stays, and what content goes. On today’s episode, reporter Molly Webster goes inside the room where the decisions are being made, listening case-by-case as editors decide who, or what, gets to be deleted. It’s a story about time and memory; mistakes and second chances; and society as we know it. This episode was reported by Molly Webster, and produced by Molly Webster and Bethel Habte. Special thanks to Kathy English, David Erdos, Ed Haber, Brews...

47 MINAUG 23
Comments
Right to be Forgotten

More Perfect: Cruel and Unusual

On the inaugural episode ofMore Perfect, we explore three little words embedded in the 8th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution: “cruel and unusual.” America has long wrestled with this concept in the context of our strongest punishment, the death penalty. A majority of “we the people” (61 percent, to be exact) are in favor of having it, but inside the Supreme Court, opinions have evolved over time in surprising ways. And outside of the court, the debate drove one woman in the UK to take on the U.S. death penalty system from Europe. It also causedstates to resuscitate old methods used for executing prisoners on death row. And perhaps more than anything, it forced a conversation on what constitutes cruel and unusual punishment. Special thanks toClaire Phillips, Nina Perry, Stephanie Jenkins, Ralph Dellapiana, Byrd Pinkerton,Elisabeth Semel, Christina Spaulding, andThe Marshall Project Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate. Also! We’re working on collecting some audience fee...

58 MINAUG 9
Comments
More Perfect: Cruel and Unusual
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