title

70 Million

Lantigua Williams & Co.

4
Followers
2
Plays
70 Million
70 Million

70 Million

Lantigua Williams & Co.

4
Followers
2
Plays
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About Us

This award-winning podcast documents how locals are addressing the role of jails in their backyards. Reporters travel around the country and hear from people directly impacted by their encounter with jails and to chronicle the progress ground-up efforts have made in diversion, bail reform, recidivism, adoption of technology and other crucial aspects of the move toward decarceration at local levels.

Latest Episodes

An Open and Shut Case, Reopened

At 17, Mark Denny was wrongfully convicted of a rape and robbery in Brooklyn. It took nearly 30 years for that conviction to be overturned -- and it might never have happened without help from the same office that prosecuted him. Reporter Sabine Jansen tells the story of the Brooklyn Conviction Review Unit, the DAs who re-investigate their colleagues’ work, and the collaboration that finally set an innocent man free.

30 MIN6 days ago
Comments
An Open and Shut Case, Reopened

The Work of Closing a Notorious Jail

Five years after Michael Brown’s death at the hands of a police officer galvanized criminal justice reform activists in St. Louis, they're gaining serious momentum to shut down the city's notorious Workhouse jail. Reporter Carolina Hidalgo spent time with the Close the Workhouse campaign and Arch City Defenders, their supporters, and detractors.

36 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
The Work of Closing a Notorious Jail

How Bail Shackles Women of Color

Tamiki Banks’ life was turned upside down when her husband was arrested, leaving her the sole breadwinner and caregiver to their twins. More than two years later, she’s still struggling, and he’s still in custody, even though he hasn’t been convicted of any crime. From Atlanta, Pamela Kirkland reports on the heavy burden women of color like Tamiki bear when a loved one is jailed.

30 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
How Bail Shackles Women of Color

When Disability Requires a Different Approach

People with intellectual and developmental disabilities, known as I/DD, are overrepresented behind bars. We go to Oregon, where case managers translate their needs for a system where the proper diagnosis is the difference between incarceration and freedom.

26 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
When Disability Requires a Different Approach

Marching Toward Reform in New Orleans

For years, to fund itself New Orleans’ criminal legal system has relied on bail, fines and fees levied on the city’s poorest. But there are signs of change in the horizon, with a groundswell of community action and two landmark federal rulings in the last year. Reporter Eve Abrams takes us inside some of the big shifts happening in the Big Easy.

32 MINJUL 15
Comments
Marching Toward Reform in New Orleans

70 Million Is Back for Season 2!

Starting July 15, hear 10 weekly episodes from a new batch of reporters who will take a closer look at communities and programs trying bold solutions to solve big problems in criminal justice. (70 Million is made possible by a grant from the Safety and Justice Challenge at the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.)

1 MINJUL 8
Comments
70 Million Is Back for Season 2!

Are Some of the Formerly Incarcerated Owed Reparations?

To close out season one, we invited two legal experts, Christina Swarns, President and Attorney-in-Charge of the Office of the Appellate Defender in New York and Scott Hechinger, Senior Staff Attorney & Dir. of Policy at the Brooklyn Defender Services, to look at what it would mean for the United States to provide financial reparations for individuals who have spent most of their lives behind bars. Moderated by 70 Million’s creator and executive producer, Juleyka Lantigua-Williams, the discussion considers current and plausible pathways to bring reparations, restitution, and other types of restorative justice to the formerly incarcerated.

29 MIN2018 OCT 29
Comments
Are Some of the Formerly Incarcerated Owed Reparations?

How New Orleans Could Set a New Course for Bail Reform

New Orleans could become the battleground for bail reform. The city has one of the highest per capita incarceration rates in the world. And most people are there because they can’t pay their bail. The current arrangement with the local bail industry gives the impression that judges there could have a financial conflict of interest when setting bail. In this episode, Sonia Paul digs into how an ongoing lawsuit, pretrial consequences of bail, and poverty, bias, and algorithms come into play.

29 MIN2018 OCT 22
Comments
How New Orleans Could Set a New Course for Bail Reform

In Miami, Jailing Fewer, Treating More

This episode is a special collaboration with Miami’s WLRN radio station, whose reporters Nadege Green and Daniel Rivero report on the county’s Criminal Mental Health Project which has been instrumental in diverting mentally ill people away from jail. They meet the judge to started the program and see how counselors, peer specialists, and officers are focusing on treatment and services rather than arrests.

26 MIN2018 OCT 15
Comments
In Miami, Jailing Fewer, Treating More

Undocumented Immigrants Are Tethered to ICE, and Private Companies, by Ankle Monitors

A handful of companies are making millions off ankle monitors strapped to undocumented immigrants in ICE custody. The makers pitch the monitors as an alternative to being jailed, but are they simply another form of bondage? Reporter Ryan Katz looks at what life is life while wearing one of these monitors. He untangles the complicated web of ICE, immigration bail agent companies, and the attorneys fighting them.

29 MIN2018 OCT 8
Comments
Undocumented Immigrants Are Tethered to ICE, and Private Companies, by Ankle Monitors

Latest Episodes

An Open and Shut Case, Reopened

At 17, Mark Denny was wrongfully convicted of a rape and robbery in Brooklyn. It took nearly 30 years for that conviction to be overturned -- and it might never have happened without help from the same office that prosecuted him. Reporter Sabine Jansen tells the story of the Brooklyn Conviction Review Unit, the DAs who re-investigate their colleagues’ work, and the collaboration that finally set an innocent man free.

30 MIN6 days ago
Comments
An Open and Shut Case, Reopened

The Work of Closing a Notorious Jail

Five years after Michael Brown’s death at the hands of a police officer galvanized criminal justice reform activists in St. Louis, they're gaining serious momentum to shut down the city's notorious Workhouse jail. Reporter Carolina Hidalgo spent time with the Close the Workhouse campaign and Arch City Defenders, their supporters, and detractors.

36 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
The Work of Closing a Notorious Jail

How Bail Shackles Women of Color

Tamiki Banks’ life was turned upside down when her husband was arrested, leaving her the sole breadwinner and caregiver to their twins. More than two years later, she’s still struggling, and he’s still in custody, even though he hasn’t been convicted of any crime. From Atlanta, Pamela Kirkland reports on the heavy burden women of color like Tamiki bear when a loved one is jailed.

30 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
How Bail Shackles Women of Color

When Disability Requires a Different Approach

People with intellectual and developmental disabilities, known as I/DD, are overrepresented behind bars. We go to Oregon, where case managers translate their needs for a system where the proper diagnosis is the difference between incarceration and freedom.

26 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
When Disability Requires a Different Approach

Marching Toward Reform in New Orleans

For years, to fund itself New Orleans’ criminal legal system has relied on bail, fines and fees levied on the city’s poorest. But there are signs of change in the horizon, with a groundswell of community action and two landmark federal rulings in the last year. Reporter Eve Abrams takes us inside some of the big shifts happening in the Big Easy.

32 MINJUL 15
Comments
Marching Toward Reform in New Orleans

70 Million Is Back for Season 2!

Starting July 15, hear 10 weekly episodes from a new batch of reporters who will take a closer look at communities and programs trying bold solutions to solve big problems in criminal justice. (70 Million is made possible by a grant from the Safety and Justice Challenge at the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.)

1 MINJUL 8
Comments
70 Million Is Back for Season 2!

Are Some of the Formerly Incarcerated Owed Reparations?

To close out season one, we invited two legal experts, Christina Swarns, President and Attorney-in-Charge of the Office of the Appellate Defender in New York and Scott Hechinger, Senior Staff Attorney & Dir. of Policy at the Brooklyn Defender Services, to look at what it would mean for the United States to provide financial reparations for individuals who have spent most of their lives behind bars. Moderated by 70 Million’s creator and executive producer, Juleyka Lantigua-Williams, the discussion considers current and plausible pathways to bring reparations, restitution, and other types of restorative justice to the formerly incarcerated.

29 MIN2018 OCT 29
Comments
Are Some of the Formerly Incarcerated Owed Reparations?

How New Orleans Could Set a New Course for Bail Reform

New Orleans could become the battleground for bail reform. The city has one of the highest per capita incarceration rates in the world. And most people are there because they can’t pay their bail. The current arrangement with the local bail industry gives the impression that judges there could have a financial conflict of interest when setting bail. In this episode, Sonia Paul digs into how an ongoing lawsuit, pretrial consequences of bail, and poverty, bias, and algorithms come into play.

29 MIN2018 OCT 22
Comments
How New Orleans Could Set a New Course for Bail Reform

In Miami, Jailing Fewer, Treating More

This episode is a special collaboration with Miami’s WLRN radio station, whose reporters Nadege Green and Daniel Rivero report on the county’s Criminal Mental Health Project which has been instrumental in diverting mentally ill people away from jail. They meet the judge to started the program and see how counselors, peer specialists, and officers are focusing on treatment and services rather than arrests.

26 MIN2018 OCT 15
Comments
In Miami, Jailing Fewer, Treating More

Undocumented Immigrants Are Tethered to ICE, and Private Companies, by Ankle Monitors

A handful of companies are making millions off ankle monitors strapped to undocumented immigrants in ICE custody. The makers pitch the monitors as an alternative to being jailed, but are they simply another form of bondage? Reporter Ryan Katz looks at what life is life while wearing one of these monitors. He untangles the complicated web of ICE, immigration bail agent companies, and the attorneys fighting them.

29 MIN2018 OCT 8
Comments
Undocumented Immigrants Are Tethered to ICE, and Private Companies, by Ankle Monitors

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