title

On the Media

WNYC Studios

321
Followers
1.5K
Plays
On the Media
On the Media

On the Media

WNYC Studios

321
Followers
1.5K
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

The Peabody Award-winning On the Media podcast is your guide to examining how the media sausage is made. Hosts Brooke Gladstone and Bob Garfield examine threats to free speech and government transparency, cast a skeptical eye on media coverage of the week’s big stories and unravel hidden political narratives in everything we read, watch and hear. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin. © WNYC Studios

Latest Episodes

A Civilization As Great As Ours

The Indian government has revoked autonomy for the Muslim-majority region of Kashmir. This week, a close look at how Hindu nationalists are rewriting Indian history in the world's largest democracy. Plus:what are the stories that America has told about itself? 1. Producer Asthaa Chaturvedi [@Pasthaaa] examines the ways Hindu nationalists have sought to rewrite history in and outside the classroom in an effort to glorify India's Hindu past, and whatthis movementmeansfor a country founded on principles of multiculturalism. Listen. 2. What are the stories that America has told about itself? Historian Greg Grandin [@GregGrandin] talks about his book, The End of the Myth: From the Frontier to the Border Wall in the Mind of America, and theold idea about limitless growth that influenced American policy and psychology. Listen.

50 MIN3 days ago
Comments
A Civilization As Great As Ours

A History of Persuasion: Part 1

Infinite scrolling. Push notifications. Autoplay. Our devices and apps were designed to keep us engaged and looking for as long as possible. Now, we’ve woken up from years on social media and our phones to discover we've been manipulated by unaccountable powers using persuasive psychological tricks. But this isn’t the first time. In this three-part series from our colleagues at The Stakes, a look at the winding story of the science of persuasion — and our collective reaction to it. In part one,a once-famous psychologist who became embroiled in controversy, and how the Unabombertried to kill him. We hear from: -Larry Stern, Professor of Sociology at Collin College -Nicklaus Suino, writer, martial arts expert, attorney and business consultant Hosted byKai Wright. Reported byAmanda Aronczyk.

20 MIN5 days ago
Comments
A History of Persuasion: Part 1

The Democracy We Think We Live In

The pathways and origins of white nationalist thought were a matter of deadly importance in coverage of last weekend’s shootings. On this week’s On the Media, how mainstream punditry launders a tolerance for xenophobia. Also, the history of American presidents and media figuresdismissingblack and brown claims to power in a democracy. Plus, what calls for additional federal oversight in Puerto Rico mean for Puerto Ricans. 1. Tom Scocca [@tomscocca], politics editor at Slate, on the journalists, writers and political figures who cater to America's racist id. Listen. 2. Adam Serwer [@AdamSerwer], staff writer at The Atlantic, on the catastrophic, deadly idea that "only white people are fit for self-government." Listen. 3. OTM producer Alana Casanova-Burgess [@AlanaLlama] reports on the conversations some Puerto Ricans are having in Puerto Rico in a historic moment for the island,including demands more democracy -- and what that means in a colonial context. Listen. Music Exurgency by ...

49 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
The Democracy We Think We Live In

Deciphering the White Power Movement

When events like the shooting in El Paso happen, the elements may indeed be obvious: Guns. Sociopathy.Alienation. But the obvious is also reductive, and risks obscuring larger forces at play.The same goes with the vocabulary of race violence: White nationalist. White identity. Alt-right. White supremacy. White power. They’re used interchangeably, which further clouds the picture. Following the events inChristchurch, New Zealand earlier this year, we spoke to University of Chicago professorKathleen Belew. She told us that theshooting was not just born of resentment and paranoia, or even radical racism, but of a clearly defined revolutionary movement: the white power movement. Belew is author ofBring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America, which describes the history of the white power movement that consolidated after the Vietnam War. She argues that if society is to wage an effective response to the white power threat, we need to work to understand it. This ...

12 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Deciphering the White Power Movement

Repairing Justice: How to Fix the Internet

Harassment and bullying are plaguing our online lives, but social media companies seem fresh out of solutions. This week, On the Media experiments with a radical approach for detoxifying the web. Can theories of criminal justice reform rehabilitate trolls and fix the internet? 1. Lindsay Blackwell [@linguangst], Facebook user experience researcher and PhD student at the University of Michigan School of Information, on the source of online harassment. Plus, Jack Dorsey [@jack], CEO of Twitter, and Ashley Feinberg [@ashleyfeinberg], a senior writer at Slate, on how Twitter can improve. Listen. 2.Danielle Sered [@daniellesered], executive director of Common Justice, on the power of replacing punishment with restoration. Producer Micah Loewinger [@MicahLoewinger] and Lindsay Blackwell [@linguangst]team up to implement a "restorative justice" approach in r/ Christianity, one of the largest forums for discussing the religion. Listen. This is the 3rd and final part in our “Repairing Justi...

50 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Repairing Justice: How to Fix the Internet

Repairing Justice: An Alternative to Prison

Last week on the show, we examined the power of the prosecutor in our justice system, and how voters are electing a new wave of so-called “progressive prosecutors” to try to turn the tide on mass incarceration. If you haven’t heard it yet, be sure to check it out. It was part one of a three-part series we’re calling “Repairing Justice”; this is part two. We’ve talked about how the law-and-order approach doesn’t work, and that we don’t want to keep locking people in jail for every infraction. But that raises the question: what, then, do we do to address injustice when it appears? Rather than the isolation and violence that prison breeds, some advocates are pushing for a new approach… one based not on punishment, but on truth and reconciliation. It’s called "restorative justice," and in this podcast extra, Bob speaks with Danielle Sered, executive director of Common Justice and a pioneer of the practice. This is Part 2 of our “Repairing Justice” series.

31 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Repairing Justice: An Alternative to Prison

Repairing Justice: The Prosecutor

It was the week of the prosecutor, with Special Counsel Robert Mueller grabbing most of the attention. But on this week’s On the Media, a closer look at the “progressive prosecutor” movement — from neighborhood politics to local media to the presidential debate stage. 1.Lara Bazelon [@larabazelon],law professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law and former director of the Loyola Law School Project for the Innocent in Los Angeles, onSen. Kamala Harris's record as a prosecutor. Listen. 2. Emily Bazelon [@emilybazelon],staff writer at The New York Times Magazine and author of Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration, on how the power of the prosecutor has grown to be so big. Listen. 3. Emily Bazelon[@emilybazelon] on the national movement to elect progressive prosecutors. Plus, progressive prosecutors Philadelphia DA Larry Krasner [@DA_LarryKrasner]and Suffolk County, MA DA Rachael Rollins [@DARollins] on their time in off...

50 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Repairing Justice: The Prosecutor

What, Me Worry?

Earlier this month, DC Comics announced that MAD Magazine will mostly stop doing what it’s done for some six decades, which is to pointedly mock American politics and culture. Barring the occasional end-of-year special, future copies of MAD will consist solely of old material.The publication, which first appeared in 1957 and hit a peak circulation of 2.8 million in 1973, has been in decline since. MAD Magazinedefined an entire generation’s distrust in the media, politicians, advertisers, and all forms of authority. For this podcast extra, Brooke spoke toJeet Heer, national affairs correspondent for The Nation, about his recent articleon the history of MAD.

13 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
What, Me Worry?

Internal Scream

Puerto Ricans packed the streets night after night this week to call for Governor Ricardo Rosselló’s resignation. On this week’s On the Media, what happens when a leader’s mockery becomes too much for citizens to bear — in San Juan, and in Washington. Plus, coming-of-age on the far-right and far-left, on YouTube. 1. Ibram X. Kendi [@DrIbram],founding director of American University’s Antiracist Research and Policy Center, on who gets to be American. Listen. 2.Pedro Reina-Pérez [@pedroreinaperez],journalist and historianwith both the University of Puerto Rico and Harvard University, andJay Fonseca [@jayfonsecapr], television and radio host, on the profane,homophobic and sexist chat messages that pushed Puerto Rico to the breaking point. Listen. 3. OTM Producer Micah Loewinger [@MicahLoewinger] considers how YouTube creators on the left, like Natalie Wynn [@ContraPoints], are challenging the platform’s surge of far right extremism. Listen.

49 MINJUL 20
Comments
Internal Scream

The Right-Wing Web Goes to the White House

On this show, we’ve often observed that what happens online rarely stays online. In the age of Pizzagate, Trump tweets and Wiki Leaksdata dumps, it is obvious that conversations online increasingly dominate, even define, our politics — a fact demonstrated yet again last Thursday when the president invited his favorite online trolls, memers and political operatives to clink champagne glasses in the White House and discuss an alleged anti-conservative bias on social media. Will Sommer, tech reporter for The Daily Beast, wrote about the odd cast of characters and what this social media summit tells us about the president’s 2020 re-election strategy.

17 MINJUL 18
Comments
The Right-Wing Web Goes to the White House

Latest Episodes

A Civilization As Great As Ours

The Indian government has revoked autonomy for the Muslim-majority region of Kashmir. This week, a close look at how Hindu nationalists are rewriting Indian history in the world's largest democracy. Plus:what are the stories that America has told about itself? 1. Producer Asthaa Chaturvedi [@Pasthaaa] examines the ways Hindu nationalists have sought to rewrite history in and outside the classroom in an effort to glorify India's Hindu past, and whatthis movementmeansfor a country founded on principles of multiculturalism. Listen. 2. What are the stories that America has told about itself? Historian Greg Grandin [@GregGrandin] talks about his book, The End of the Myth: From the Frontier to the Border Wall in the Mind of America, and theold idea about limitless growth that influenced American policy and psychology. Listen.

50 MIN3 days ago
Comments
A Civilization As Great As Ours

A History of Persuasion: Part 1

Infinite scrolling. Push notifications. Autoplay. Our devices and apps were designed to keep us engaged and looking for as long as possible. Now, we’ve woken up from years on social media and our phones to discover we've been manipulated by unaccountable powers using persuasive psychological tricks. But this isn’t the first time. In this three-part series from our colleagues at The Stakes, a look at the winding story of the science of persuasion — and our collective reaction to it. In part one,a once-famous psychologist who became embroiled in controversy, and how the Unabombertried to kill him. We hear from: -Larry Stern, Professor of Sociology at Collin College -Nicklaus Suino, writer, martial arts expert, attorney and business consultant Hosted byKai Wright. Reported byAmanda Aronczyk.

20 MIN5 days ago
Comments
A History of Persuasion: Part 1

The Democracy We Think We Live In

The pathways and origins of white nationalist thought were a matter of deadly importance in coverage of last weekend’s shootings. On this week’s On the Media, how mainstream punditry launders a tolerance for xenophobia. Also, the history of American presidents and media figuresdismissingblack and brown claims to power in a democracy. Plus, what calls for additional federal oversight in Puerto Rico mean for Puerto Ricans. 1. Tom Scocca [@tomscocca], politics editor at Slate, on the journalists, writers and political figures who cater to America's racist id. Listen. 2. Adam Serwer [@AdamSerwer], staff writer at The Atlantic, on the catastrophic, deadly idea that "only white people are fit for self-government." Listen. 3. OTM producer Alana Casanova-Burgess [@AlanaLlama] reports on the conversations some Puerto Ricans are having in Puerto Rico in a historic moment for the island,including demands more democracy -- and what that means in a colonial context. Listen. Music Exurgency by ...

49 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
The Democracy We Think We Live In

Deciphering the White Power Movement

When events like the shooting in El Paso happen, the elements may indeed be obvious: Guns. Sociopathy.Alienation. But the obvious is also reductive, and risks obscuring larger forces at play.The same goes with the vocabulary of race violence: White nationalist. White identity. Alt-right. White supremacy. White power. They’re used interchangeably, which further clouds the picture. Following the events inChristchurch, New Zealand earlier this year, we spoke to University of Chicago professorKathleen Belew. She told us that theshooting was not just born of resentment and paranoia, or even radical racism, but of a clearly defined revolutionary movement: the white power movement. Belew is author ofBring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America, which describes the history of the white power movement that consolidated after the Vietnam War. She argues that if society is to wage an effective response to the white power threat, we need to work to understand it. This ...

12 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Deciphering the White Power Movement

Repairing Justice: How to Fix the Internet

Harassment and bullying are plaguing our online lives, but social media companies seem fresh out of solutions. This week, On the Media experiments with a radical approach for detoxifying the web. Can theories of criminal justice reform rehabilitate trolls and fix the internet? 1. Lindsay Blackwell [@linguangst], Facebook user experience researcher and PhD student at the University of Michigan School of Information, on the source of online harassment. Plus, Jack Dorsey [@jack], CEO of Twitter, and Ashley Feinberg [@ashleyfeinberg], a senior writer at Slate, on how Twitter can improve. Listen. 2.Danielle Sered [@daniellesered], executive director of Common Justice, on the power of replacing punishment with restoration. Producer Micah Loewinger [@MicahLoewinger] and Lindsay Blackwell [@linguangst]team up to implement a "restorative justice" approach in r/ Christianity, one of the largest forums for discussing the religion. Listen. This is the 3rd and final part in our “Repairing Justi...

50 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Repairing Justice: How to Fix the Internet

Repairing Justice: An Alternative to Prison

Last week on the show, we examined the power of the prosecutor in our justice system, and how voters are electing a new wave of so-called “progressive prosecutors” to try to turn the tide on mass incarceration. If you haven’t heard it yet, be sure to check it out. It was part one of a three-part series we’re calling “Repairing Justice”; this is part two. We’ve talked about how the law-and-order approach doesn’t work, and that we don’t want to keep locking people in jail for every infraction. But that raises the question: what, then, do we do to address injustice when it appears? Rather than the isolation and violence that prison breeds, some advocates are pushing for a new approach… one based not on punishment, but on truth and reconciliation. It’s called "restorative justice," and in this podcast extra, Bob speaks with Danielle Sered, executive director of Common Justice and a pioneer of the practice. This is Part 2 of our “Repairing Justice” series.

31 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Repairing Justice: An Alternative to Prison

Repairing Justice: The Prosecutor

It was the week of the prosecutor, with Special Counsel Robert Mueller grabbing most of the attention. But on this week’s On the Media, a closer look at the “progressive prosecutor” movement — from neighborhood politics to local media to the presidential debate stage. 1.Lara Bazelon [@larabazelon],law professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law and former director of the Loyola Law School Project for the Innocent in Los Angeles, onSen. Kamala Harris's record as a prosecutor. Listen. 2. Emily Bazelon [@emilybazelon],staff writer at The New York Times Magazine and author of Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration, on how the power of the prosecutor has grown to be so big. Listen. 3. Emily Bazelon[@emilybazelon] on the national movement to elect progressive prosecutors. Plus, progressive prosecutors Philadelphia DA Larry Krasner [@DA_LarryKrasner]and Suffolk County, MA DA Rachael Rollins [@DARollins] on their time in off...

50 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Repairing Justice: The Prosecutor

What, Me Worry?

Earlier this month, DC Comics announced that MAD Magazine will mostly stop doing what it’s done for some six decades, which is to pointedly mock American politics and culture. Barring the occasional end-of-year special, future copies of MAD will consist solely of old material.The publication, which first appeared in 1957 and hit a peak circulation of 2.8 million in 1973, has been in decline since. MAD Magazinedefined an entire generation’s distrust in the media, politicians, advertisers, and all forms of authority. For this podcast extra, Brooke spoke toJeet Heer, national affairs correspondent for The Nation, about his recent articleon the history of MAD.

13 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
What, Me Worry?

Internal Scream

Puerto Ricans packed the streets night after night this week to call for Governor Ricardo Rosselló’s resignation. On this week’s On the Media, what happens when a leader’s mockery becomes too much for citizens to bear — in San Juan, and in Washington. Plus, coming-of-age on the far-right and far-left, on YouTube. 1. Ibram X. Kendi [@DrIbram],founding director of American University’s Antiracist Research and Policy Center, on who gets to be American. Listen. 2.Pedro Reina-Pérez [@pedroreinaperez],journalist and historianwith both the University of Puerto Rico and Harvard University, andJay Fonseca [@jayfonsecapr], television and radio host, on the profane,homophobic and sexist chat messages that pushed Puerto Rico to the breaking point. Listen. 3. OTM Producer Micah Loewinger [@MicahLoewinger] considers how YouTube creators on the left, like Natalie Wynn [@ContraPoints], are challenging the platform’s surge of far right extremism. Listen.

49 MINJUL 20
Comments
Internal Scream

The Right-Wing Web Goes to the White House

On this show, we’ve often observed that what happens online rarely stays online. In the age of Pizzagate, Trump tweets and Wiki Leaksdata dumps, it is obvious that conversations online increasingly dominate, even define, our politics — a fact demonstrated yet again last Thursday when the president invited his favorite online trolls, memers and political operatives to clink champagne glasses in the White House and discuss an alleged anti-conservative bias on social media. Will Sommer, tech reporter for The Daily Beast, wrote about the odd cast of characters and what this social media summit tells us about the president’s 2020 re-election strategy.

17 MINJUL 18
Comments
The Right-Wing Web Goes to the White House

Listen Now On Himalaya