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The New Yorker: Politics and More

WNYC Studios and The New Yorker

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The New Yorker: Politics and More

The New Yorker: Politics and More

WNYC Studios and The New Yorker

488
Followers
1.8K
Plays
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About Us

A weekly discussion about politics, hosted by The New Yorker's executive editor, Dorothy Wickenden.

Latest Episodes

What Would a World Without Prisons Be Like?

Mass incarceration is now widely regarded as a prejudiced and deeply harmful set of policies. Bipartisan support exists for some degree of criminal-justice reform, and, in some circles, the idea of prison abolition is also gaining traction. Kai Wright, the host of the WNYC podcast “The United States of Anxiety,” spoke about the movement with Paul Butler, a law professor and former federal prosecutor who saw firsthand the damage that prosecution causes; and sujatha baliga, a MacArthur Foundation fellowwho leads the Restorative Justice Project at the nonprofit Impact Justice and a survivor of sexual violence.“Prison abolition doesn’t mean that everybody who’s locked up gets to come home tomorrow,” Butler explains.Instead, activists envision a gradual process of “decarceration,” and the creation of alternative forms of justice and harm reduction.“Abolition, to my mind, isn’t just about ending the prisons,” baliga adds. “It’s about ending binary processes which pit us as ‘us, them,’ ‘right, wrong’; somebody has to be lying, somebody’s telling the truth. That is not the way that we get to healing.”

21 MIN21 h ago
Comments
What Would a World Without Prisons Be Like?

Adam Schiff, Hakeem Jeffries, and the Framers Weigh In on Impeachment

Last week, the Senate opened theimpeachment trialofDonald Trump. With Republicansstanding immovablyby the President, the trial is expected to result in Trump’s acquittal. The Framers of the Constitution issued dire warnings about the spectre of “factionalism” and how it could endanger American democracy.Jelani Cobbjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss the origins of partisanship in American politics and how it’s playing out in arguments about whether the President should be removed from office.

20 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Adam Schiff, Hakeem Jeffries, and the Framers Weigh In on Impeachment

Ten Years After “The New Jim Crow”

The United States has the largest prison population in the world. But, until the publication of Michelle Alexander’s book “The New Jim Crow,” in 2010, most people didn’t use the term mass incarceration, or consider the practice a social-justice issue. Alexander argued that the increasing imprisonment of black and brown men—through rising arrest rates and longer sentences—was not merely a response to crime but a system of racial control. “The drug war was in part a politically motivated strategy, a backlash to the civil-rights movement, but it was also a reflection of conscious and unconscious biases fuelled by media portrayals of drug users,” Alexander tellsDavid Remnick. “Those racial stereotypes were resonant of the same stereotypes of slaves and folks during the Jim Crow era.”

13 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Ten Years After “The New Jim Crow”

As the Impeachment Trial Begins, the Democratic Candidates Struggle to Forcefully Take on President Trump

This week, Democratic Presidential candidates met for theirfinal debatebefore the Iowa caucuses, a few weeks after Trump ordered the targeted killing of the Iranian military commanderQassam Suleimani. They talked about how America’s role in the world is threatened by the President’s erratic—and, in the case of Ukraine, likely criminal—approach to foreign policy. But many voters remain skeptical that Trump can be beaten.Susan B. Glasserjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss the radical uncertainties of the 2020 race.

20 MIN1 w ago
Comments
As the Impeachment Trial Begins, the Democratic Candidates Struggle to Forcefully Take on President Trump

In Iowa, the Democratic Candidates Respond to the Conflict with Iran

The New Yorker’sEric Lachis in Iowa for the month leading up to the Democratic caucuses. Next week’s debate, in Des Moines, was likely going to focus on health care and other domestic issues core to the Democratic platform, but the agenda may instead be dominated by a discussion of the Trump Administration’s killing of the Iranian general Qassem Suleimani and the United States’ fraught history of war in the Middle East. Polls show that Joe Biden is trusted on foreign-policy issues, but Lach suggests that Bernie Sanders’s history of opposing wars—and his quick and confident articulation of his position on Iran—may sway voters seeking a clear message. Nearly a year into the campaign, votes will finally be cast, and in Iowa the deciding factor may involve personal contact more than ideological positions. Iowa voters tend to say, “ ‘I’ve shaken this person’s hand, and I’ve shaken this person’s hand, and I’m going to make my decision after I’ve shaken this other person’s ...

13 MIN2 w ago
Comments
In Iowa, the Democratic Candidates Respond to the Conflict with Iran

Mad Men: Trump’s Perilous Approach to Dictators

Since taking office, President Trump has repeatedly praisedRussian President Vladimir Putin, held two summits withKim Jong Un, of North Korea, and hostedChinese President Xi Jinpingat Mar-a-Lago. Trump relies on his instincts when it comes to the conduct of foreign policy, and his sycophancy toward dictators has been a defining feature of his Presidency. He has had a somewhat different approach to the Iranian leadership. Last week, Trump ordered an air strike that killed Qassem Suleimani, a high-ranking Iranian official, escalating tensions between the United States and Iran.Evan Osnosjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss what Donald Trump may not understand about the minds of authoritarian leaders.

19 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Mad Men: Trump’s Perilous Approach to Dictators

Terry Gross Talks with David Remnick

David Remnick has appeared as the guest of Terry Gross on “Fresh Air” a number of times over the years, talking about Russia, Muhammad Ali, and other subjects. Hosting “Fresh Air” for nearly forty-five years, Gross is a defining voice of NPR, and is perhaps the most celebrated interviewer of our time. In October, 2019, the tables turned, and Gross joined Remnick as his guest for a live interview at The New Yorker Festival. They spoke about how she first found her way to the microphone, the role of feminism in establishing NPR, the limits of her expertise, and what she has had to give up to prepare for serious conversations day after day.

24 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Terry Gross Talks with David Remnick

The Hyperpartisan State

North Carolina is a relatively purple state, where voting between the two major parties tends to be close. That might suggest a place of common ground and compromise, but it’s quite the opposite. “A couple of years before the rest of the country got nasty, we started to get nasty,” a North Carolina political scientist tellsCharles Bethea. Not long ago, a veto-override vote devolved into a screaming match on the floor, to which the police were called. Bethea, a longtime political reporter based in Atlanta, went to Raleigh to examine how hyper-partisanship plays out on a state capitol, where everyone knows each other, and the political calculations seem to revolve more on who did what to whom, and when, than on who wants to do what now.

25 MIN2019 DEC 24
Comments
The Hyperpartisan State

Peter Schjeldahl on Good Cheer During Bad Times

Four months ago,Peter Schjeldahl,The New Yorker’slongtime art critic, was diagnosed with terminal lung cancer. In this week’s issue of the magazine,Schjeldahl writes a personal historyabout New York’s downtown art scene in the sixties, how he overcame years of abusing drugs and alcohol, what led him to art criticism, and the trick of finding beauty in cracks in the sidewalk. For the finalPolitical Scene podcastof 2019,Schjeldahljoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss life beyond politics.

16 MIN2019 DEC 20
Comments
Peter Schjeldahl on Good Cheer During Bad Times

A Worldwide #MeToo Protest that Began in Chile

Three weeks ago, members of a Chilean feminist collective called Las Tesis put on blindfolds and party dresses and took to the streets. The festive atmosphere put their purpose in stark relief: the song they sang was “Un Violador En Tu Camino” (“A Rapist in Your Path”). It’s a sharp indictment of the Chilean police, against whom a hundred charges of sexual violence have been lodged since the beginning of the anti-government protests in October. The lyrics also target the patriarchy in general. The song might have remained a local phenomenon, but someone put it on Twitter, and, in the span of a few days, it became the anthem of women protesting sexism and violence throughout Latin America. A few days later, the protest was replicated in Paris and Berlin, and, shortly thereafter, in Istanbul, where it was shut down by police.The New Yorker’sCamila Osoriowas recently in Chile and recounts the exciting story of the creation of a global movement.

7 MIN2019 DEC 17
Comments
A Worldwide #MeToo Protest that Began in Chile

Latest Episodes

What Would a World Without Prisons Be Like?

Mass incarceration is now widely regarded as a prejudiced and deeply harmful set of policies. Bipartisan support exists for some degree of criminal-justice reform, and, in some circles, the idea of prison abolition is also gaining traction. Kai Wright, the host of the WNYC podcast “The United States of Anxiety,” spoke about the movement with Paul Butler, a law professor and former federal prosecutor who saw firsthand the damage that prosecution causes; and sujatha baliga, a MacArthur Foundation fellowwho leads the Restorative Justice Project at the nonprofit Impact Justice and a survivor of sexual violence.“Prison abolition doesn’t mean that everybody who’s locked up gets to come home tomorrow,” Butler explains.Instead, activists envision a gradual process of “decarceration,” and the creation of alternative forms of justice and harm reduction.“Abolition, to my mind, isn’t just about ending the prisons,” baliga adds. “It’s about ending binary processes which pit us as ‘us, them,’ ‘right, wrong’; somebody has to be lying, somebody’s telling the truth. That is not the way that we get to healing.”

21 MIN21 h ago
Comments
What Would a World Without Prisons Be Like?

Adam Schiff, Hakeem Jeffries, and the Framers Weigh In on Impeachment

Last week, the Senate opened theimpeachment trialofDonald Trump. With Republicansstanding immovablyby the President, the trial is expected to result in Trump’s acquittal. The Framers of the Constitution issued dire warnings about the spectre of “factionalism” and how it could endanger American democracy.Jelani Cobbjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss the origins of partisanship in American politics and how it’s playing out in arguments about whether the President should be removed from office.

20 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Adam Schiff, Hakeem Jeffries, and the Framers Weigh In on Impeachment

Ten Years After “The New Jim Crow”

The United States has the largest prison population in the world. But, until the publication of Michelle Alexander’s book “The New Jim Crow,” in 2010, most people didn’t use the term mass incarceration, or consider the practice a social-justice issue. Alexander argued that the increasing imprisonment of black and brown men—through rising arrest rates and longer sentences—was not merely a response to crime but a system of racial control. “The drug war was in part a politically motivated strategy, a backlash to the civil-rights movement, but it was also a reflection of conscious and unconscious biases fuelled by media portrayals of drug users,” Alexander tellsDavid Remnick. “Those racial stereotypes were resonant of the same stereotypes of slaves and folks during the Jim Crow era.”

13 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Ten Years After “The New Jim Crow”

As the Impeachment Trial Begins, the Democratic Candidates Struggle to Forcefully Take on President Trump

This week, Democratic Presidential candidates met for theirfinal debatebefore the Iowa caucuses, a few weeks after Trump ordered the targeted killing of the Iranian military commanderQassam Suleimani. They talked about how America’s role in the world is threatened by the President’s erratic—and, in the case of Ukraine, likely criminal—approach to foreign policy. But many voters remain skeptical that Trump can be beaten.Susan B. Glasserjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss the radical uncertainties of the 2020 race.

20 MIN1 w ago
Comments
As the Impeachment Trial Begins, the Democratic Candidates Struggle to Forcefully Take on President Trump

In Iowa, the Democratic Candidates Respond to the Conflict with Iran

The New Yorker’sEric Lachis in Iowa for the month leading up to the Democratic caucuses. Next week’s debate, in Des Moines, was likely going to focus on health care and other domestic issues core to the Democratic platform, but the agenda may instead be dominated by a discussion of the Trump Administration’s killing of the Iranian general Qassem Suleimani and the United States’ fraught history of war in the Middle East. Polls show that Joe Biden is trusted on foreign-policy issues, but Lach suggests that Bernie Sanders’s history of opposing wars—and his quick and confident articulation of his position on Iran—may sway voters seeking a clear message. Nearly a year into the campaign, votes will finally be cast, and in Iowa the deciding factor may involve personal contact more than ideological positions. Iowa voters tend to say, “ ‘I’ve shaken this person’s hand, and I’ve shaken this person’s hand, and I’m going to make my decision after I’ve shaken this other person’s ...

13 MIN2 w ago
Comments
In Iowa, the Democratic Candidates Respond to the Conflict with Iran

Mad Men: Trump’s Perilous Approach to Dictators

Since taking office, President Trump has repeatedly praisedRussian President Vladimir Putin, held two summits withKim Jong Un, of North Korea, and hostedChinese President Xi Jinpingat Mar-a-Lago. Trump relies on his instincts when it comes to the conduct of foreign policy, and his sycophancy toward dictators has been a defining feature of his Presidency. He has had a somewhat different approach to the Iranian leadership. Last week, Trump ordered an air strike that killed Qassem Suleimani, a high-ranking Iranian official, escalating tensions between the United States and Iran.Evan Osnosjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss what Donald Trump may not understand about the minds of authoritarian leaders.

19 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Mad Men: Trump’s Perilous Approach to Dictators

Terry Gross Talks with David Remnick

David Remnick has appeared as the guest of Terry Gross on “Fresh Air” a number of times over the years, talking about Russia, Muhammad Ali, and other subjects. Hosting “Fresh Air” for nearly forty-five years, Gross is a defining voice of NPR, and is perhaps the most celebrated interviewer of our time. In October, 2019, the tables turned, and Gross joined Remnick as his guest for a live interview at The New Yorker Festival. They spoke about how she first found her way to the microphone, the role of feminism in establishing NPR, the limits of her expertise, and what she has had to give up to prepare for serious conversations day after day.

24 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Terry Gross Talks with David Remnick

The Hyperpartisan State

North Carolina is a relatively purple state, where voting between the two major parties tends to be close. That might suggest a place of common ground and compromise, but it’s quite the opposite. “A couple of years before the rest of the country got nasty, we started to get nasty,” a North Carolina political scientist tellsCharles Bethea. Not long ago, a veto-override vote devolved into a screaming match on the floor, to which the police were called. Bethea, a longtime political reporter based in Atlanta, went to Raleigh to examine how hyper-partisanship plays out on a state capitol, where everyone knows each other, and the political calculations seem to revolve more on who did what to whom, and when, than on who wants to do what now.

25 MIN2019 DEC 24
Comments
The Hyperpartisan State

Peter Schjeldahl on Good Cheer During Bad Times

Four months ago,Peter Schjeldahl,The New Yorker’slongtime art critic, was diagnosed with terminal lung cancer. In this week’s issue of the magazine,Schjeldahl writes a personal historyabout New York’s downtown art scene in the sixties, how he overcame years of abusing drugs and alcohol, what led him to art criticism, and the trick of finding beauty in cracks in the sidewalk. For the finalPolitical Scene podcastof 2019,Schjeldahljoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss life beyond politics.

16 MIN2019 DEC 20
Comments
Peter Schjeldahl on Good Cheer During Bad Times

A Worldwide #MeToo Protest that Began in Chile

Three weeks ago, members of a Chilean feminist collective called Las Tesis put on blindfolds and party dresses and took to the streets. The festive atmosphere put their purpose in stark relief: the song they sang was “Un Violador En Tu Camino” (“A Rapist in Your Path”). It’s a sharp indictment of the Chilean police, against whom a hundred charges of sexual violence have been lodged since the beginning of the anti-government protests in October. The lyrics also target the patriarchy in general. The song might have remained a local phenomenon, but someone put it on Twitter, and, in the span of a few days, it became the anthem of women protesting sexism and violence throughout Latin America. A few days later, the protest was replicated in Paris and Berlin, and, shortly thereafter, in Istanbul, where it was shut down by police.The New Yorker’sCamila Osoriowas recently in Chile and recounts the exciting story of the creation of a global movement.

7 MIN2019 DEC 17
Comments
A Worldwide #MeToo Protest that Began in Chile
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