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The Governance Podcast

Centre for the Study of Governance and Society

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The Governance Podcast
The Governance Podcast

The Governance Podcast

Centre for the Study of Governance and Society

6
Followers
8
Plays
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Conversations on governance with leading social scientists around the world. Run by the Centre for the Study of Governance and Society at King's College London.

Latest Episodes

Self-Governing Social Orders, Economic Methods and Academic Women

In this special roundtable discussion on the Governance Podcast, we sit down with Jennifer Murtazashvili (Pittsburgh), Liya Palagashvili (SUNY Purchase) and Shruti Rajagopalan (Mercatus Center) to discuss their research on self-governing social orders outside the west, the future of economic methodology and the challenges women face in academic science. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guests Jennifer Murtazashvili (bio) is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh. Drawing from diverse research methods including field experiments, public opinion surveys, and ethnographic fieldwork, Murtazashvili focuses her work on Central and South Asia, and the former Soviet Union. She also has experience advising for the U.S. Department of Defense, the United Nations Development Program, and UNICEF. Her work focuses on formal and informal political institutions, the political economy of development, decentralization and local governance, and post-conflict reconstruction. Liya Palagashvili (bio) is an Assistant Professor of Economics at State University of New York-Purchase and a research fellow with NYU Law. For the 2018-2019 academic year, she was a Visiting Scholar in the Department of Political Economy at King's College London. She is currently investigating the regulatory and public policy environment for technology startups and is broadly interested in questions of governance, polycentricity, and the role of external influence and aid on institutions. In 2016, Liya was selected as a Forbes'30 under 30'in Law and Policy. Shruti Rajagopalan (bio) is a Senior Research Fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, and a Fellow at the Classical Liberal Institute at NYU School of Law. She is also Associate Professor of Economics at State University of New York, Purchase College (currently on leave). Her research interests specifically include law and economics, public choice theory, and constitutional economics. Her research has been published in peer-reviewed journals, law reviews, and books. She also enjoys writing in the popular press and has a fortnightly column called The Impartial Spectator inMint. Skip Ahead 0:45: When we talk about self-governing social orders, we use concepts like federalism, polycentric governance, constitutional governance, all of which tend to originate in western and specifically American empirical contexts, so we often assume a specific set of norms and institutions that may be absent or difficult to nourish in the developing world. Collectively, your research addresses really important questions about the nature and viability of self-governing social orders across almost every continent. Jennifer, you've been working on Central Eurasia, Shruti, you've been working on India, and Liya, you've been working on diverse cases in Africa and Native American groups in the US. I want to start with a couple of broad questions which you can take in whichever order and direction you want. Firstly, within your own research programs, what does a self-governing or polycentric social order look like? And what do you think are some of the biggest challenges to the emergence of polycentric social orders around the world? 5:39: What functions do mahallas in Uzbekistan play in terms of the provision of public services or social order? Are they compensating for a lack of state infrastructure? 7:20: Liya, your work has looked at a different angle in which self governing communities have been sabotaged in both Africa and the US. What sorts of mechanisms are you observing that are undermining local and community governance? 11:26: Shruti, you've looked at a case on environmental governance in India wh

73 MIN2 d ago
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Self-Governing Social Orders, Economic Methods and Academic Women

Forms of Domination in the Market: A Conversation with Elizabeth Anderson

Can employers wield dictatorial power over employees? Join us for a lively discussion between Mark Pennington (King’s College London) and Elizabeth Anderson (University of Michigan) on how power accumulates in the market, which institutions can ameliorate the problem, and how Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) as a discipline helps us understand the human condition. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guest Elizabeth Anderson is the John Dewey Distinguished University Professor; John Rawls Collegiate Professor; Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and Department Chair in Philosophy at the University of Michigan. Professor Elizabeth Anderson specializes in ethics, social and political philosophy, feminist theory, social epistemology, and the philosophy of economics and the social sciences. She is particularly interested in exploring the interactions of social science with moral and political theory, how we learn to improve our value judgments, the epistemic functions of emotions and democratic deliberation, and issues of race, gender, and equality. She is the author ofValue in Ethics and Economics,The Imperative of Integration,and, most recently,Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives (And Why We Don’t Talk About It),as well as articles on value theory, the ethical limitations of markets, facts and values in social scientific research, feminist and social epistemology, racial integration and affirmative action, rational choice and social norms, democratic theory, egalitarianism, and the history of ethics (focusing on Kant, Mill, and Dewey). Professor Anderson is currently working on a history of egalitarianism from the Levellers to the present. Professor Anderson is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and designed and was the first Director of the Program in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at UM. Skip Ahead 1:10: How does it feel to be the recipient of a Genius award? 2:09: What is the ratio of women in major philosophy departments? 2:40: What do you plan to do with the MacArthur grant? 5:35: If I may, let’s discuss some of the things related to our work at the Centre, which is about governance arrangements, the relationship between formal and informal governance structures. And in your case you’ve done this interesting work on what I would describe as the governance of the employment relationship, and that work as I understand it really builds on your previous work thinking about what equality means or should mean. 9:05: You make some strong and provocative claims in the book arguing that some of the powers that employers have are equivalent to those you see in dictatorial regimes. I think at some point you say it’s almost as though the management of those firms resembles a communist dictatorship. 12:15: It really is challenging the way you list these kind of practices. Most people would have a gut reaction, that was certainly my sense when I read about this. But I was also thinking… how do you situate an understanding of the kind of abusive relationships that happen in these corporate environments with many other aspects of life? … I guess the argument would be, human beings aren’t always very humane. And this is true in all aspects of life. So if we’re thinking about the role of that private government plays in contributing to domination, we also need to have an understanding of the sources of domination outside of work. I didn’t feel you said all that much about that in the book. 16:39: Why on your account do you think that in this employment relationship we see these kinds of practices that lead to the domination of people? 19:25: Thinking about the arguments that economists would typically make in these situations, people would argue that if the

54 MIN1 w ago
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Forms of Domination in the Market: A Conversation with Elizabeth Anderson

Can We Trust the Polls? A Conversation With Roger Mortimore

In this special episode of the Governance Podcast, we're partnering with Andrew Blick of the KCL Centre for British Politics and Government to discuss all things public opinion with Roger Mortimore, Professor at King's College London and Director of Political Analysis at Ipsos Mori. As a leading social scientist behind the UK general election exit poll, Professor Mortimore takes us through the origins, mechanics and surprising realities of predicting election outcomes. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guest Roger Mortimore is Ipsos MORI’s Director of Political Analysis, and has worked in the MORI/Ipsos MORI political team since 1993. Since 2012 he has also been Professor of Public Opinion and Political Analysis in the department of political economy at King's College London. Roger researches political and social attitudes, especially but not exclusively related to voting and elections; and he is responsible for the Political Monitor Aggregate, a data set consisting of more than half a million interviews stretching back to 1996. He is also the best point of contact for exploring any of Ipsos MORI’s historical archive of survey data, covering records of almost every survey which MORI and Ipsos MORI have conducted, on a wide range of subjects, since MORI was founded in 1969. Skip Ahead 01:20: What is an exit poll? 5:51: You said that more money is spent on the one exit poll than is spent on polling through the whole campaign, which shows that the people paying for it obviously place a high premium on this but who are the customers? Who is paying for this? 7:28: In the end there is only one exit poll, or one publicly available exit poll that we know for certain exists. 8:12: In the context of the UK and what we call the 'first past the post' electoral system, what particular challenges does that system present as opposed to a proportional system? 10:20: What is success in the context of an exit poll? 14:12: I also suspect, for instance, that in 1997, whether you were 10, 20 seats out, when Labour were going to win a huge majority and that was pretty widely expected, doesn't really matter that much. It's in an era where, for the time being, results have been very tight and winning a workable majority is much more challenging. Suddenly you're expected to produce this pin point accuracy. 15:46: If you have unlimited time, money, etc, what might be done differently? 19:53: General elections are obviously to a large extent about parties, so I want to ask about how this figures into what you're doing. If there are one or more parties that have not contested a general election before and they are now running a significant number of candidates, how do you deal with that? 28:47: So you must get to learn a lot about the geography and profile of the United Kingdom for this job. 30:25: There are historic examples of electoral pacts between parties. The most famous one is probably the 1918 election where Lloyd George and the liberals who followed him into his government, splitting from the Asquith liberals, had an arrangement with the conservatives that in predetermined seats they would not run candidates against each other. Were this to come up again in a future general election, how might an exit poll try and model that? 32:54: Again a similar question going back to the electoral system, we have a phenomenon of tactical voting... how do you account for it? 36:06: It'd be interesting to talk about how you came to be in this post. What was your path to who you are now? 37:40: When did exit polling start? 42:21: What actually happens on the ground on election day? 47:54: A word you mentioned a lot is 'computer.' I suppose in 1970 I suspect there was a computer of some kind involved, but even in

51 MIN2 w ago
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Can We Trust the Polls? A Conversation With Roger Mortimore

States as Laboratories for Policy Experimentation: In Conversation with Jenna Bednar

How do states learn how to solve problems? Does federalism create chaos or diffuse conflict in complex societies? Join us for this conversation between Hanna Kleider (King’s College London) and Jenna Bednar (University of Michigan) on the key challenges and benefits of multi-layered governance. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guest Jenna Bednar is the Edie N Goldenberg Endowed Director for the University of Michigan in Washington Program; Professor of Political Science, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; Research Professor, Center for Political Studies and the Institute for Social Research at Michigan. Professor Bednar’s research is on the analysis of institutions, focusing on the theoretical underpinnings of the stability of federal states. Her most recent book, The Robust Federationdemonstrates how complementary institutions maintain and adjust the distribution of authority between national and state governments.This book makes two theoretical contributions to the study of federalism’s design. First, it shows that distributions suggested by a constitution mean nothing if the governments have no incentive to abide by them, and intergovernmental retaliation tends to be inefficient. The book’s second contribution is that while no institutional safeguard is sufficient to improve the union’s prosperity, institutions work together to improve compliance with the distribution of authority, thereby boosting the union’s performance. Skip Ahead 1:08: The topic of federalism has gained a lot of attention, not only by academics but also by international institutions. Policymakers more generally often recommend federalism as a solution to conflict-ridden and heterogeneous societies. What do you think makes federalism so attractive in these contexts? 7:33: I really like this idea of retaliatory non-compliance by the states vis a vis the federal government. Can you give a recent example of how that would work? 11:50: You’re seeing this with climate change too, how states are taking the lead in challenging federal authorities. 16:41: Since we’re already talking about policy experimentation, that’s kind of an important part of federalism research. We think that state governments should take the lead in experimenting with new policies. What’s a good way federal governments can nudge the regional ones? 21:09: Going back to your work on the principles of federalism, you talk about institutional design, you don’t want to give one ideal federal system but you have some sort of design principles. If you were to give policy makers some advice on what those are, what would you tell them? 24:27: What do you think about this idea that if federations are linguistically homogenous, they will tend towards centralization? And if they’re heterogeneous, they’ll tend towards decentralization? 27:38: What’s the next stage in your research agenda? 30:08: How did you become interested in this area of research? Diversity, federalism, comparative institutions?

33 MINOCT 10
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States as Laboratories for Policy Experimentation: In Conversation with Jenna Bednar

Post-Communism Derailed: A Conversation with Roger Schoenman

Thirty years since the fall of the Berlin Wall, how are post-communist nations changing their relationship with the west? Are right wing populists in Central Europe successfully proposing a new philosophy of governance? In this episode of the Governance Podcast, RogerSchoenman (UC Santa Cruz) sits down with Tomas Maltby (King’s College London) to discuss the ever-shifting political and economic trajectory of post-communist Europe. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guest Roger Schoenman is an Associate Professor of Politics at UC Santa Cruz. Prof. Schoenman’s work explores three related topics: 1) the varieties of capitalism in the post-socialist countries, 2) the role of networks in political organization and 3) the conditions under which la...

43 MINAUG 16
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Post-Communism Derailed: A Conversation with Roger Schoenman

What's Behind the London Housing Crisis? In Conversation with John Myers

Urban housing prices are skyrocketing in London and around the globe. What's behind the crisis and how do we fix it? In this episode of the Governance Podcast, John Myers of London YIMBY joins Sam DeCanio of King's College London for a discussion about the critical policy response we need to reduce costs and reinvigorate our cities. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guest John Myers is the Co-Founder of London YIMBY, a grassroots campaign to end the housing crisis with the support of local people. Skip Ahead 0:39: What is the London housing crisis and how bad is it? 2:39: Homes have not become more expensive or technologically different than they were 100 years ago—it’s bricks, mortar, the tech is the same. And at the same time, wages in Lon...

52 MINJUL 29
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What's Behind the London Housing Crisis? In Conversation with John Myers

Lessons from British Economic History: In Conversation with Gary Cox

What are the origins of constrained government? How did globalisation influence politics in Victorian Britain, and are there lessons for modern times? In this episode of the Governance Podcast, Gary Cox (Stanford) sits down with Anton Howes (King’s College London) to discuss his corpus of research in economic history and political economy from the 17th through the 19th centuries. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guest Gary W. Cox is the William Bennett Munro Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. In addition to numerous articles in the areas of legislative and electoral politics, Cox is author ofThe Efficient Secret(winner of the 1983 Samuel H Beer dissertation prize and the 2003 George H Hallett Award), co-author ofLegislati...

57 MINJUL 24
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Lessons from British Economic History: In Conversation with Gary Cox

Radical Solutions to Liberal Problems: In Conversation with Lea Ypi

Modern political life is fraught with difficult choices: cosmopolitanism or statism? Liberalism or socialism? Where do these debates stand and can political theorists help us choose? In this episode of the Governance Podcast, Carmen Pavel (King’s College London) sits down with Lea Ypi (LSE) for a conversation about the fundamental role of politics and radical democracy in current affairs. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guest Lea Ypi is Professor in Political Theory in the Government Department, London School of Economics, and Adjunct Associate Professor in Philosophy at the Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University. Before joining the LSE, she was a Post-doctoral Prize Research Fellow at Nuffield College (Oxford) a...

48 MINJUL 9
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Radical Solutions to Liberal Problems: In Conversation with Lea Ypi

What's Wrong With Democracy? A Conversation with Larry Bartels

Larry Bartels and Chris Achen argue that we have a romanticised view of democracy. How is democracy letting us down and what can we do to reverse course? In this episode of the Governance Podcast, Sam DeCanio of CSGS sits down with Larry Bartels to discuss his book with Chris Achen, Democracy for Realists: Why Elections Do Not Produce Responsive Government. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guest Larry Bartels is the May Werthan Shayne Chair of Public Policy and Social Science at Vanderbilt University. His scholarship and teaching focus on public opinion, electoral politics, public policy, and political representation. His books includeUnequal Democracy: The Political Economy of the New Gilded Age(2nd ed., Russell Sage Foundation and Princeton...

46 MINJUL 2
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What's Wrong With Democracy? A Conversation with Larry Bartels

Brexit and the British Constitution: In Conversation with Vernon Bogdanor

How do we interpret the current political moment in Britain? Is Brexit changing Britain’s unwritten constitution? Tune in to our special Brexit edition of the Governance Podcast between Andrew Blick and Vernon Bogdanor. This episode is co-hosted by the Centre for British Politics and Government at King’s College London. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitterorinstagram(@csgskcl). The Guest Vernon Bogdanor is a Research Professor at the Institute for Contemporary British History at King’s College London and Professor of Politics at the New College of the Humanities. He is also Emeritus Professor of Politics and Government at the University of Oxford where he is an Emeritus Fellow of Brasenose College. Since 1966, he has been Senior Tutor (1979–85 and 1996–97), Vice-Princip...

28 MINJUN 24
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Brexit and the British Constitution: In Conversation with Vernon Bogdanor

Latest Episodes

Self-Governing Social Orders, Economic Methods and Academic Women

In this special roundtable discussion on the Governance Podcast, we sit down with Jennifer Murtazashvili (Pittsburgh), Liya Palagashvili (SUNY Purchase) and Shruti Rajagopalan (Mercatus Center) to discuss their research on self-governing social orders outside the west, the future of economic methodology and the challenges women face in academic science. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guests Jennifer Murtazashvili (bio) is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh. Drawing from diverse research methods including field experiments, public opinion surveys, and ethnographic fieldwork, Murtazashvili focuses her work on Central and South Asia, and the former Soviet Union. She also has experience advising for the U.S. Department of Defense, the United Nations Development Program, and UNICEF. Her work focuses on formal and informal political institutions, the political economy of development, decentralization and local governance, and post-conflict reconstruction. Liya Palagashvili (bio) is an Assistant Professor of Economics at State University of New York-Purchase and a research fellow with NYU Law. For the 2018-2019 academic year, she was a Visiting Scholar in the Department of Political Economy at King's College London. She is currently investigating the regulatory and public policy environment for technology startups and is broadly interested in questions of governance, polycentricity, and the role of external influence and aid on institutions. In 2016, Liya was selected as a Forbes'30 under 30'in Law and Policy. Shruti Rajagopalan (bio) is a Senior Research Fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, and a Fellow at the Classical Liberal Institute at NYU School of Law. She is also Associate Professor of Economics at State University of New York, Purchase College (currently on leave). Her research interests specifically include law and economics, public choice theory, and constitutional economics. Her research has been published in peer-reviewed journals, law reviews, and books. She also enjoys writing in the popular press and has a fortnightly column called The Impartial Spectator inMint. Skip Ahead 0:45: When we talk about self-governing social orders, we use concepts like federalism, polycentric governance, constitutional governance, all of which tend to originate in western and specifically American empirical contexts, so we often assume a specific set of norms and institutions that may be absent or difficult to nourish in the developing world. Collectively, your research addresses really important questions about the nature and viability of self-governing social orders across almost every continent. Jennifer, you've been working on Central Eurasia, Shruti, you've been working on India, and Liya, you've been working on diverse cases in Africa and Native American groups in the US. I want to start with a couple of broad questions which you can take in whichever order and direction you want. Firstly, within your own research programs, what does a self-governing or polycentric social order look like? And what do you think are some of the biggest challenges to the emergence of polycentric social orders around the world? 5:39: What functions do mahallas in Uzbekistan play in terms of the provision of public services or social order? Are they compensating for a lack of state infrastructure? 7:20: Liya, your work has looked at a different angle in which self governing communities have been sabotaged in both Africa and the US. What sorts of mechanisms are you observing that are undermining local and community governance? 11:26: Shruti, you've looked at a case on environmental governance in India wh

73 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Self-Governing Social Orders, Economic Methods and Academic Women

Forms of Domination in the Market: A Conversation with Elizabeth Anderson

Can employers wield dictatorial power over employees? Join us for a lively discussion between Mark Pennington (King’s College London) and Elizabeth Anderson (University of Michigan) on how power accumulates in the market, which institutions can ameliorate the problem, and how Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) as a discipline helps us understand the human condition. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guest Elizabeth Anderson is the John Dewey Distinguished University Professor; John Rawls Collegiate Professor; Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and Department Chair in Philosophy at the University of Michigan. Professor Elizabeth Anderson specializes in ethics, social and political philosophy, feminist theory, social epistemology, and the philosophy of economics and the social sciences. She is particularly interested in exploring the interactions of social science with moral and political theory, how we learn to improve our value judgments, the epistemic functions of emotions and democratic deliberation, and issues of race, gender, and equality. She is the author ofValue in Ethics and Economics,The Imperative of Integration,and, most recently,Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives (And Why We Don’t Talk About It),as well as articles on value theory, the ethical limitations of markets, facts and values in social scientific research, feminist and social epistemology, racial integration and affirmative action, rational choice and social norms, democratic theory, egalitarianism, and the history of ethics (focusing on Kant, Mill, and Dewey). Professor Anderson is currently working on a history of egalitarianism from the Levellers to the present. Professor Anderson is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and designed and was the first Director of the Program in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at UM. Skip Ahead 1:10: How does it feel to be the recipient of a Genius award? 2:09: What is the ratio of women in major philosophy departments? 2:40: What do you plan to do with the MacArthur grant? 5:35: If I may, let’s discuss some of the things related to our work at the Centre, which is about governance arrangements, the relationship between formal and informal governance structures. And in your case you’ve done this interesting work on what I would describe as the governance of the employment relationship, and that work as I understand it really builds on your previous work thinking about what equality means or should mean. 9:05: You make some strong and provocative claims in the book arguing that some of the powers that employers have are equivalent to those you see in dictatorial regimes. I think at some point you say it’s almost as though the management of those firms resembles a communist dictatorship. 12:15: It really is challenging the way you list these kind of practices. Most people would have a gut reaction, that was certainly my sense when I read about this. But I was also thinking… how do you situate an understanding of the kind of abusive relationships that happen in these corporate environments with many other aspects of life? … I guess the argument would be, human beings aren’t always very humane. And this is true in all aspects of life. So if we’re thinking about the role of that private government plays in contributing to domination, we also need to have an understanding of the sources of domination outside of work. I didn’t feel you said all that much about that in the book. 16:39: Why on your account do you think that in this employment relationship we see these kinds of practices that lead to the domination of people? 19:25: Thinking about the arguments that economists would typically make in these situations, people would argue that if the

54 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Forms of Domination in the Market: A Conversation with Elizabeth Anderson

Can We Trust the Polls? A Conversation With Roger Mortimore

In this special episode of the Governance Podcast, we're partnering with Andrew Blick of the KCL Centre for British Politics and Government to discuss all things public opinion with Roger Mortimore, Professor at King's College London and Director of Political Analysis at Ipsos Mori. As a leading social scientist behind the UK general election exit poll, Professor Mortimore takes us through the origins, mechanics and surprising realities of predicting election outcomes. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guest Roger Mortimore is Ipsos MORI’s Director of Political Analysis, and has worked in the MORI/Ipsos MORI political team since 1993. Since 2012 he has also been Professor of Public Opinion and Political Analysis in the department of political economy at King's College London. Roger researches political and social attitudes, especially but not exclusively related to voting and elections; and he is responsible for the Political Monitor Aggregate, a data set consisting of more than half a million interviews stretching back to 1996. He is also the best point of contact for exploring any of Ipsos MORI’s historical archive of survey data, covering records of almost every survey which MORI and Ipsos MORI have conducted, on a wide range of subjects, since MORI was founded in 1969. Skip Ahead 01:20: What is an exit poll? 5:51: You said that more money is spent on the one exit poll than is spent on polling through the whole campaign, which shows that the people paying for it obviously place a high premium on this but who are the customers? Who is paying for this? 7:28: In the end there is only one exit poll, or one publicly available exit poll that we know for certain exists. 8:12: In the context of the UK and what we call the 'first past the post' electoral system, what particular challenges does that system present as opposed to a proportional system? 10:20: What is success in the context of an exit poll? 14:12: I also suspect, for instance, that in 1997, whether you were 10, 20 seats out, when Labour were going to win a huge majority and that was pretty widely expected, doesn't really matter that much. It's in an era where, for the time being, results have been very tight and winning a workable majority is much more challenging. Suddenly you're expected to produce this pin point accuracy. 15:46: If you have unlimited time, money, etc, what might be done differently? 19:53: General elections are obviously to a large extent about parties, so I want to ask about how this figures into what you're doing. If there are one or more parties that have not contested a general election before and they are now running a significant number of candidates, how do you deal with that? 28:47: So you must get to learn a lot about the geography and profile of the United Kingdom for this job. 30:25: There are historic examples of electoral pacts between parties. The most famous one is probably the 1918 election where Lloyd George and the liberals who followed him into his government, splitting from the Asquith liberals, had an arrangement with the conservatives that in predetermined seats they would not run candidates against each other. Were this to come up again in a future general election, how might an exit poll try and model that? 32:54: Again a similar question going back to the electoral system, we have a phenomenon of tactical voting... how do you account for it? 36:06: It'd be interesting to talk about how you came to be in this post. What was your path to who you are now? 37:40: When did exit polling start? 42:21: What actually happens on the ground on election day? 47:54: A word you mentioned a lot is 'computer.' I suppose in 1970 I suspect there was a computer of some kind involved, but even in

51 MIN2 w ago
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Can We Trust the Polls? A Conversation With Roger Mortimore

States as Laboratories for Policy Experimentation: In Conversation with Jenna Bednar

How do states learn how to solve problems? Does federalism create chaos or diffuse conflict in complex societies? Join us for this conversation between Hanna Kleider (King’s College London) and Jenna Bednar (University of Michigan) on the key challenges and benefits of multi-layered governance. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guest Jenna Bednar is the Edie N Goldenberg Endowed Director for the University of Michigan in Washington Program; Professor of Political Science, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; Research Professor, Center for Political Studies and the Institute for Social Research at Michigan. Professor Bednar’s research is on the analysis of institutions, focusing on the theoretical underpinnings of the stability of federal states. Her most recent book, The Robust Federationdemonstrates how complementary institutions maintain and adjust the distribution of authority between national and state governments.This book makes two theoretical contributions to the study of federalism’s design. First, it shows that distributions suggested by a constitution mean nothing if the governments have no incentive to abide by them, and intergovernmental retaliation tends to be inefficient. The book’s second contribution is that while no institutional safeguard is sufficient to improve the union’s prosperity, institutions work together to improve compliance with the distribution of authority, thereby boosting the union’s performance. Skip Ahead 1:08: The topic of federalism has gained a lot of attention, not only by academics but also by international institutions. Policymakers more generally often recommend federalism as a solution to conflict-ridden and heterogeneous societies. What do you think makes federalism so attractive in these contexts? 7:33: I really like this idea of retaliatory non-compliance by the states vis a vis the federal government. Can you give a recent example of how that would work? 11:50: You’re seeing this with climate change too, how states are taking the lead in challenging federal authorities. 16:41: Since we’re already talking about policy experimentation, that’s kind of an important part of federalism research. We think that state governments should take the lead in experimenting with new policies. What’s a good way federal governments can nudge the regional ones? 21:09: Going back to your work on the principles of federalism, you talk about institutional design, you don’t want to give one ideal federal system but you have some sort of design principles. If you were to give policy makers some advice on what those are, what would you tell them? 24:27: What do you think about this idea that if federations are linguistically homogenous, they will tend towards centralization? And if they’re heterogeneous, they’ll tend towards decentralization? 27:38: What’s the next stage in your research agenda? 30:08: How did you become interested in this area of research? Diversity, federalism, comparative institutions?

33 MINOCT 10
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States as Laboratories for Policy Experimentation: In Conversation with Jenna Bednar

Post-Communism Derailed: A Conversation with Roger Schoenman

Thirty years since the fall of the Berlin Wall, how are post-communist nations changing their relationship with the west? Are right wing populists in Central Europe successfully proposing a new philosophy of governance? In this episode of the Governance Podcast, RogerSchoenman (UC Santa Cruz) sits down with Tomas Maltby (King’s College London) to discuss the ever-shifting political and economic trajectory of post-communist Europe. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guest Roger Schoenman is an Associate Professor of Politics at UC Santa Cruz. Prof. Schoenman’s work explores three related topics: 1) the varieties of capitalism in the post-socialist countries, 2) the role of networks in political organization and 3) the conditions under which la...

43 MINAUG 16
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Post-Communism Derailed: A Conversation with Roger Schoenman

What's Behind the London Housing Crisis? In Conversation with John Myers

Urban housing prices are skyrocketing in London and around the globe. What's behind the crisis and how do we fix it? In this episode of the Governance Podcast, John Myers of London YIMBY joins Sam DeCanio of King's College London for a discussion about the critical policy response we need to reduce costs and reinvigorate our cities. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guest John Myers is the Co-Founder of London YIMBY, a grassroots campaign to end the housing crisis with the support of local people. Skip Ahead 0:39: What is the London housing crisis and how bad is it? 2:39: Homes have not become more expensive or technologically different than they were 100 years ago—it’s bricks, mortar, the tech is the same. And at the same time, wages in Lon...

52 MINJUL 29
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What's Behind the London Housing Crisis? In Conversation with John Myers

Lessons from British Economic History: In Conversation with Gary Cox

What are the origins of constrained government? How did globalisation influence politics in Victorian Britain, and are there lessons for modern times? In this episode of the Governance Podcast, Gary Cox (Stanford) sits down with Anton Howes (King’s College London) to discuss his corpus of research in economic history and political economy from the 17th through the 19th centuries. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guest Gary W. Cox is the William Bennett Munro Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. In addition to numerous articles in the areas of legislative and electoral politics, Cox is author ofThe Efficient Secret(winner of the 1983 Samuel H Beer dissertation prize and the 2003 George H Hallett Award), co-author ofLegislati...

57 MINJUL 24
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Lessons from British Economic History: In Conversation with Gary Cox

Radical Solutions to Liberal Problems: In Conversation with Lea Ypi

Modern political life is fraught with difficult choices: cosmopolitanism or statism? Liberalism or socialism? Where do these debates stand and can political theorists help us choose? In this episode of the Governance Podcast, Carmen Pavel (King’s College London) sits down with Lea Ypi (LSE) for a conversation about the fundamental role of politics and radical democracy in current affairs. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guest Lea Ypi is Professor in Political Theory in the Government Department, London School of Economics, and Adjunct Associate Professor in Philosophy at the Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University. Before joining the LSE, she was a Post-doctoral Prize Research Fellow at Nuffield College (Oxford) a...

48 MINJUL 9
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Radical Solutions to Liberal Problems: In Conversation with Lea Ypi

What's Wrong With Democracy? A Conversation with Larry Bartels

Larry Bartels and Chris Achen argue that we have a romanticised view of democracy. How is democracy letting us down and what can we do to reverse course? In this episode of the Governance Podcast, Sam DeCanio of CSGS sits down with Larry Bartels to discuss his book with Chris Achen, Democracy for Realists: Why Elections Do Not Produce Responsive Government. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitter or instagram (@csgskcl). The Guest Larry Bartels is the May Werthan Shayne Chair of Public Policy and Social Science at Vanderbilt University. His scholarship and teaching focus on public opinion, electoral politics, public policy, and political representation. His books includeUnequal Democracy: The Political Economy of the New Gilded Age(2nd ed., Russell Sage Foundation and Princeton...

46 MINJUL 2
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What's Wrong With Democracy? A Conversation with Larry Bartels

Brexit and the British Constitution: In Conversation with Vernon Bogdanor

How do we interpret the current political moment in Britain? Is Brexit changing Britain’s unwritten constitution? Tune in to our special Brexit edition of the Governance Podcast between Andrew Blick and Vernon Bogdanor. This episode is co-hosted by the Centre for British Politics and Government at King’s College London. Subscribe on iTunes and Spotify Subscribe to the Governance Podcast oniTunesandSpotifytoday and get all our latest episodes directly in your pocket. Follow Us For more information about our upcoming podcasts and events, follow us onfacebook,twitterorinstagram(@csgskcl). The Guest Vernon Bogdanor is a Research Professor at the Institute for Contemporary British History at King’s College London and Professor of Politics at the New College of the Humanities. He is also Emeritus Professor of Politics and Government at the University of Oxford where he is an Emeritus Fellow of Brasenose College. Since 1966, he has been Senior Tutor (1979–85 and 1996–97), Vice-Princip...

28 MINJUN 24
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Brexit and the British Constitution: In Conversation with Vernon Bogdanor
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