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Constant Wonder

BYUradio

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Constant Wonder
Constant Wonder

Constant Wonder

BYUradio

3
Followers
1
Plays
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About Us

Join host Marcus Smith for conversations that invite you to discover, explore, and reengage with the wonders of the world around you. Weekdays at 2p EST/11a PST

Latest Episodes

World Population, Tim O'Brien, Insomnia

Tim O’Brien: Dad's Maybe Book Guest:Tim O’Brien, author, "The Things They Carried," “Dad’s Maybe Book”. Tim O’Brien, award-winning author of “The Things They Carried” and “Going After Cacciato” has released his first book in 18 years. Dedicated to his sons, “Dad’s Maybe Book” documents the declining life of an older father. How the Environment and Population InfluenceWhere People Live Guest:Joel Cohen, Professor, Populations, Rockefeller University and Columbia University This is the first of a three-part series on demography: why do people in the world live where they do and what forces population changes? Insomnia and Suicide(originally aired August 27, 2019) Guest: Zach Simmons, sleep and suicide researcher, graduate student, Clinical Psychology, Brigham Young University Around 800,000 people die by suicide every year, and it is the second leading cause of death among 15-29 year olds. This is a serious public health problem, but research has shown ways to prevent suicide, including interventions and access to mental health resources. However, a recent study from BYU has found a predictive relationship between patients who report insomnia and later attempt suicide, which gives us one more insight into preventing tragedy. Insomnia: You Can Learn to Sleep Guest:Donn Posner, President, Sleep Well Consultants, Clinical Research Psychologist, Palo Alto Veterans Institute for Research Insomnia is extremely common, and its fatiguing effects can be devastating to those who live with it. Cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective long-term treatment for the disorder.

-1 s9 hours ago
Comments
World Population, Tim O'Brien, Insomnia

Sourdough, Jerusalem's Old City, No Place Like Kansas

Scientist Recreates 4,000 Year-Old Egyptian Sourdough Bread Guest:Seamus Blackley, Father of the Xbox, Physicist Father of the Xbox and scientist Seamus Blackley has recreated ancient Egyptian sourdough bread using authentic ingredients and 4,000 year-old yeast extracted from Egyptian pottery. The First and Only Sourdough Library in the World Guest: Karl De Smedt, Sourdough Librarian, Puratos Sourdough Library, St. Vith, Belgium St. Vith, Belgium is home to the only sourdough library in the world--they are dedicated to preserving and researching sourdough for current and future generations. How Three Major Religions Coexist and Worship in Jerusalem's Old City Guest: Shon Hopkin, Associate Professor, Religious Education, and Chair of the Council of Religious Outreac, Brigham Young University In Jerusalem's Old City, three major religions negotiate daily life and worship, a challenge when holy sites are literally layered one on top of the other. There's No Place Like Kansas Guest:Tom ...

-1 s3 days ago
Comments
Sourdough, Jerusalem's Old City, No Place Like Kansas

Wilding, Bamberger Ranch, The Stowaway, Asteroids

Converting an EnglishEstate into a Thriving Ecosystem(originally aired September 18, 2019) Guest:Isabella Tree, journalist and author, “Wilding: Returning Nature to Our Farm” Take a walk on the wild side--the wild side of conservation, that is! When Isabella Tree’s 3,500 acre farm was failing,she and her husband decided to switch gears from intensive farming to a hands-off conservation technique called “rewilding.” Check out the miraculous tenacity and wonder of nature. Selah,Bamberger Ranch Preserve(originally aired September 30, 2019) Guest:J. David Bamberger, founder, Bamberger Ranch Preserve David Bamberger set out to buy the worst piece of ranchland he could find in Texas Hill Country. He now lives on a 5,500-acre nature preserve that he created out of Texas’s most desolate wilderness. Sprout Lands Guest:William Bryant Logan, faculty, New York Botanical Gardens, and author, “Sprout Lands: Tending the Endless Gift of Trees” The act of pruning trees to both care for them ...

-1 s4 days ago
Comments
Wilding, Bamberger Ranch, The Stowaway, Asteroids

Shyness, Tree Islands, Chemical Warfare

Shyness is Both Burden and Blessing Guest:Joe Moran, Professor, English and Cultural History, Liverpool John Moores University, and author, "Shrinking Violets: The Secret Life of Shyness" We have an awful habit in our modern society of turning differences into problems.Several years ago, a professor at Northwestern University named Christopher Lane wrote a book on the medicalization of shyness. Our guest today extolls the virtues of shyness and examines why shyness is criticized more in some cultures than others. Tree “Islands” Are a Cost-Effective Reforestation Alternative to Plantations Guest:Karen Holl, restoration ecologist, and Professor, Environmental Studies, University of California Santa Cruz A new study finds that planting tree “islands” is a cost-effective way to restore tropical forests. The practice harnesses nature's own processes--birds and bees and fungus all do their part. The Strategic Importance of Guano Islands Guest:Daniel Immerwahr, Associate Professor, His...

-1 s5 days ago
Comments
Shyness, Tree Islands, Chemical Warfare

Ice King, Japanese Ice, Joan of Arc

How the World Kept Cool When "The Ice King" Ruled Guest: Jonathan Rees, Professor of History, Colorado State University-Pueblo, author, "Refrigeration Nation," "Before the Refrigerator," and "Refrigerator" Before the refrigerator, or air conditioning or electric fans, ice was a hot-–or rather, cold-–commodity. We’re talking with Jonathan Rees about the surprisingly complex workings of the ice industry, and the “Ice King” who started it all by shipping New England ice all around the globe. How delicious can you make ice? Guest:Nathan Hopson, Associate Professor, Modern Japanese and East Asian History, Nagoya University, Japan The Japanese commercialized the ice trade way back in the 11th century. Kakigori was a frozen Japanesedelicacy that eventually led to the shave ice craze that pops up every year on American street corners. The Glory, Gory Game of Mayan Ball(originally aired August 2, 2019) Guest:Stephen Houston, Chair, Department of Anthropology, Dupee Family Professor of S...

-1 s6 days ago
Comments
Ice King, Japanese Ice, Joan of Arc

Midwestern Strange, Lego Art, Raspberry Pi

The Mysteries That Fly Over Flyover Country Guest:B.J. Hollars, Associate Professor of English, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, and author, “Midwestern Strange: Hunting Monsters, Martians, and the Weird in Flyover Country” B.J. Hollars spent a year traveling through Midwest America, researching sightings of werewolves, giant lake turtles, and aliens. What he found out was that people who claim to see extraterrestrials and freakish monsters can teach us to maintain our own sense of curiousity and skepticism. Not always an easy balance. King Solomon's Mines? Guest: Erez Ben-Yosef, Associate Professor of Archaeology, Department of Archaeology and Near Eastern Cultures, Tel Aviv University, and head of the Timna Valley Excavation Project The Edomites, some of the ancient inhabitants of southern Israel, were thought to be a nomadic people who left little evidence of their existence.But some recently discovered remnants of ancient copper production may shed light on where King Solom...

-1 s1 weeks ago
Comments
Midwestern Strange, Lego Art, Raspberry Pi

Best of Constant Wonder

Scam Me If You Can Guest: Frank Abagnale, author, "Scam Me If You Can," "Catch Me If You Can," "The Art of the Steal" and "Stealing your Life" We talk to a former professional imposter and world-renowned authority on the subjects of fraud, forgery, and cyber security to learn how to recognize a scam. He explains why public schools need to teach ethics, and he examines regret and redemption in his own life. Discovering the San José’s $17 Billion Treasure Guest: Jeff Kaeli, Research Engineer, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) In 2015, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution discovered the San José, a sunken ship from 1708 loaded with treasure valued up to $17 billion. On Safari with Africa’s Last Great Herds Guest: Sy Montgomery, naturalist and author, “The Magnificent Migration: On Safari with Africa’s Last Great Herds” After three decades of waiting, Sy Montgomery finally had the opportunity to visit Africa with the foremost expert on African wildlife, Richard Este...

-1 s1 weeks ago
Comments
Best of Constant Wonder

Rett Girls, Into the Planet, Black Confederates

Rett Girls Guest:Monica Coenraads, Executive Director, Rett Syndrome Research Trust, and mother of Chelsea, a girl with Rett Syndrome Rett Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder that affects 1 in 10,000 girls. It's marked by a loss of function in seemingly normal babies. People with the syndrome have symptoms of autism, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, Parkinson's and anxiety. Hope for a Cure for Rett Syndrome Guest:Tim Riley, Chief Scientific Officer, Rett Syndrome Research Trust A cure for Rett Syndrome may be on the horizon, and scientists have several possible methods for treating the disease. In fact, the cure for this disease could help treat other brain disorders. Using Eye-Tracking Technology to Communicate with People Who Have Rett Syndrome Guest:Julie Peterson, mother of Emily, a girl with Rett Syndrome. Emily Peterson uses eye-tracking technology to communicate with her family. Exploring the World’s Deepest Underwater Caves Guest: Jill Heinerth, Explorer-in-Residence, The Royal Ca...

-1 s1 weeks ago
Comments
Rett Girls, Into the Planet, Black Confederates

Milk and Economics, Prehistoric Baby Bottles, Beast So Fierce

Drink Milk? Conquer the World! Guest:Justin Cook, Assistant Professor, Economics, UC Merced Milk, or more accurately the ability to digest it, possibly led to Europe's economic prosperity and their colonization of the globe. PrehistoricSippy Cups Guest: Julie Dunne, Biomolecular Archaeologist, University of Bristol Prehistoric parents used sippy cups in animal shapes, not unlike our plastic versions. Chernobyl's Untold Story (originally aired May 16, 2019) Guest:Adam Higginbotham, author, "Midnight in Chernobyl: The Untold Story of the World’s Greatest Nuclear Disaster" Everyone who’s gotten past 8th grade has heard of Chernobyl and the accident at the nuclear power plant. But author Adam Higginbotham introduces a new perspective on what happened there, telling stories that have literally never been told before. Hear the Elephants(originally airedAugust 6, 2019) Guest: Joyce Poole, elephant ethologist, conservationsist, and Co-Director, ElephantVoices Joyce Poole can translate ele...

-1 s1 weeks ago
Comments
Milk and Economics, Prehistoric Baby Bottles, Beast So Fierce

Before Noah, Little Women, Roald Dahl

What Did the Ark Look Like? Guest:Irving Finkel, Keeper of Ancient Mesopotamian Artifacts, The British Museum, and author, "The Ark Before Noah: Decoding the Story of the Flood" The Noah’s Ark story you grew up with is not the only such story. Some of the oldest texts we have, carved on Mesopotamian clay tablets, are about 4,000 years old. But in this story, the boat was an enormous round "coracle." Symbolism Is All Around Us Guest:Jonathan Pageau, Artist, Editor of The Orthodox Arts Journal, and Host of The Symbolic World podcast Symbolism surrounds us—it has been a central part of our culture, and continues to be through today. Sometimes symbolism is part of a participant's experience and sometimes it's part of a passive viewing experience. The Weird and Wonderful World of Roald Dahl Guest: Rachel Wadham, Education and Juvenile Literature Librarian, Brigham Young University Roald Dahl had a traumatic childhood and his books tackle the injustice faced by kids, who find a way to o...

-1 s1 weeks ago
Comments
Before Noah, Little Women, Roald Dahl

Latest Episodes

World Population, Tim O'Brien, Insomnia

Tim O’Brien: Dad's Maybe Book Guest:Tim O’Brien, author, "The Things They Carried," “Dad’s Maybe Book”. Tim O’Brien, award-winning author of “The Things They Carried” and “Going After Cacciato” has released his first book in 18 years. Dedicated to his sons, “Dad’s Maybe Book” documents the declining life of an older father. How the Environment and Population InfluenceWhere People Live Guest:Joel Cohen, Professor, Populations, Rockefeller University and Columbia University This is the first of a three-part series on demography: why do people in the world live where they do and what forces population changes? Insomnia and Suicide(originally aired August 27, 2019) Guest: Zach Simmons, sleep and suicide researcher, graduate student, Clinical Psychology, Brigham Young University Around 800,000 people die by suicide every year, and it is the second leading cause of death among 15-29 year olds. This is a serious public health problem, but research has shown ways to prevent suicide, including interventions and access to mental health resources. However, a recent study from BYU has found a predictive relationship between patients who report insomnia and later attempt suicide, which gives us one more insight into preventing tragedy. Insomnia: You Can Learn to Sleep Guest:Donn Posner, President, Sleep Well Consultants, Clinical Research Psychologist, Palo Alto Veterans Institute for Research Insomnia is extremely common, and its fatiguing effects can be devastating to those who live with it. Cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective long-term treatment for the disorder.

-1 s9 hours ago
Comments
World Population, Tim O'Brien, Insomnia

Sourdough, Jerusalem's Old City, No Place Like Kansas

Scientist Recreates 4,000 Year-Old Egyptian Sourdough Bread Guest:Seamus Blackley, Father of the Xbox, Physicist Father of the Xbox and scientist Seamus Blackley has recreated ancient Egyptian sourdough bread using authentic ingredients and 4,000 year-old yeast extracted from Egyptian pottery. The First and Only Sourdough Library in the World Guest: Karl De Smedt, Sourdough Librarian, Puratos Sourdough Library, St. Vith, Belgium St. Vith, Belgium is home to the only sourdough library in the world--they are dedicated to preserving and researching sourdough for current and future generations. How Three Major Religions Coexist and Worship in Jerusalem's Old City Guest: Shon Hopkin, Associate Professor, Religious Education, and Chair of the Council of Religious Outreac, Brigham Young University In Jerusalem's Old City, three major religions negotiate daily life and worship, a challenge when holy sites are literally layered one on top of the other. There's No Place Like Kansas Guest:Tom ...

-1 s3 days ago
Comments
Sourdough, Jerusalem's Old City, No Place Like Kansas

Wilding, Bamberger Ranch, The Stowaway, Asteroids

Converting an EnglishEstate into a Thriving Ecosystem(originally aired September 18, 2019) Guest:Isabella Tree, journalist and author, “Wilding: Returning Nature to Our Farm” Take a walk on the wild side--the wild side of conservation, that is! When Isabella Tree’s 3,500 acre farm was failing,she and her husband decided to switch gears from intensive farming to a hands-off conservation technique called “rewilding.” Check out the miraculous tenacity and wonder of nature. Selah,Bamberger Ranch Preserve(originally aired September 30, 2019) Guest:J. David Bamberger, founder, Bamberger Ranch Preserve David Bamberger set out to buy the worst piece of ranchland he could find in Texas Hill Country. He now lives on a 5,500-acre nature preserve that he created out of Texas’s most desolate wilderness. Sprout Lands Guest:William Bryant Logan, faculty, New York Botanical Gardens, and author, “Sprout Lands: Tending the Endless Gift of Trees” The act of pruning trees to both care for them ...

-1 s4 days ago
Comments
Wilding, Bamberger Ranch, The Stowaway, Asteroids

Shyness, Tree Islands, Chemical Warfare

Shyness is Both Burden and Blessing Guest:Joe Moran, Professor, English and Cultural History, Liverpool John Moores University, and author, "Shrinking Violets: The Secret Life of Shyness" We have an awful habit in our modern society of turning differences into problems.Several years ago, a professor at Northwestern University named Christopher Lane wrote a book on the medicalization of shyness. Our guest today extolls the virtues of shyness and examines why shyness is criticized more in some cultures than others. Tree “Islands” Are a Cost-Effective Reforestation Alternative to Plantations Guest:Karen Holl, restoration ecologist, and Professor, Environmental Studies, University of California Santa Cruz A new study finds that planting tree “islands” is a cost-effective way to restore tropical forests. The practice harnesses nature's own processes--birds and bees and fungus all do their part. The Strategic Importance of Guano Islands Guest:Daniel Immerwahr, Associate Professor, His...

-1 s5 days ago
Comments
Shyness, Tree Islands, Chemical Warfare

Ice King, Japanese Ice, Joan of Arc

How the World Kept Cool When "The Ice King" Ruled Guest: Jonathan Rees, Professor of History, Colorado State University-Pueblo, author, "Refrigeration Nation," "Before the Refrigerator," and "Refrigerator" Before the refrigerator, or air conditioning or electric fans, ice was a hot-–or rather, cold-–commodity. We’re talking with Jonathan Rees about the surprisingly complex workings of the ice industry, and the “Ice King” who started it all by shipping New England ice all around the globe. How delicious can you make ice? Guest:Nathan Hopson, Associate Professor, Modern Japanese and East Asian History, Nagoya University, Japan The Japanese commercialized the ice trade way back in the 11th century. Kakigori was a frozen Japanesedelicacy that eventually led to the shave ice craze that pops up every year on American street corners. The Glory, Gory Game of Mayan Ball(originally aired August 2, 2019) Guest:Stephen Houston, Chair, Department of Anthropology, Dupee Family Professor of S...

-1 s6 days ago
Comments
Ice King, Japanese Ice, Joan of Arc

Midwestern Strange, Lego Art, Raspberry Pi

The Mysteries That Fly Over Flyover Country Guest:B.J. Hollars, Associate Professor of English, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, and author, “Midwestern Strange: Hunting Monsters, Martians, and the Weird in Flyover Country” B.J. Hollars spent a year traveling through Midwest America, researching sightings of werewolves, giant lake turtles, and aliens. What he found out was that people who claim to see extraterrestrials and freakish monsters can teach us to maintain our own sense of curiousity and skepticism. Not always an easy balance. King Solomon's Mines? Guest: Erez Ben-Yosef, Associate Professor of Archaeology, Department of Archaeology and Near Eastern Cultures, Tel Aviv University, and head of the Timna Valley Excavation Project The Edomites, some of the ancient inhabitants of southern Israel, were thought to be a nomadic people who left little evidence of their existence.But some recently discovered remnants of ancient copper production may shed light on where King Solom...

-1 s1 weeks ago
Comments
Midwestern Strange, Lego Art, Raspberry Pi

Best of Constant Wonder

Scam Me If You Can Guest: Frank Abagnale, author, "Scam Me If You Can," "Catch Me If You Can," "The Art of the Steal" and "Stealing your Life" We talk to a former professional imposter and world-renowned authority on the subjects of fraud, forgery, and cyber security to learn how to recognize a scam. He explains why public schools need to teach ethics, and he examines regret and redemption in his own life. Discovering the San José’s $17 Billion Treasure Guest: Jeff Kaeli, Research Engineer, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) In 2015, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution discovered the San José, a sunken ship from 1708 loaded with treasure valued up to $17 billion. On Safari with Africa’s Last Great Herds Guest: Sy Montgomery, naturalist and author, “The Magnificent Migration: On Safari with Africa’s Last Great Herds” After three decades of waiting, Sy Montgomery finally had the opportunity to visit Africa with the foremost expert on African wildlife, Richard Este...

-1 s1 weeks ago
Comments
Best of Constant Wonder

Rett Girls, Into the Planet, Black Confederates

Rett Girls Guest:Monica Coenraads, Executive Director, Rett Syndrome Research Trust, and mother of Chelsea, a girl with Rett Syndrome Rett Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder that affects 1 in 10,000 girls. It's marked by a loss of function in seemingly normal babies. People with the syndrome have symptoms of autism, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, Parkinson's and anxiety. Hope for a Cure for Rett Syndrome Guest:Tim Riley, Chief Scientific Officer, Rett Syndrome Research Trust A cure for Rett Syndrome may be on the horizon, and scientists have several possible methods for treating the disease. In fact, the cure for this disease could help treat other brain disorders. Using Eye-Tracking Technology to Communicate with People Who Have Rett Syndrome Guest:Julie Peterson, mother of Emily, a girl with Rett Syndrome. Emily Peterson uses eye-tracking technology to communicate with her family. Exploring the World’s Deepest Underwater Caves Guest: Jill Heinerth, Explorer-in-Residence, The Royal Ca...

-1 s1 weeks ago
Comments
Rett Girls, Into the Planet, Black Confederates

Milk and Economics, Prehistoric Baby Bottles, Beast So Fierce

Drink Milk? Conquer the World! Guest:Justin Cook, Assistant Professor, Economics, UC Merced Milk, or more accurately the ability to digest it, possibly led to Europe's economic prosperity and their colonization of the globe. PrehistoricSippy Cups Guest: Julie Dunne, Biomolecular Archaeologist, University of Bristol Prehistoric parents used sippy cups in animal shapes, not unlike our plastic versions. Chernobyl's Untold Story (originally aired May 16, 2019) Guest:Adam Higginbotham, author, "Midnight in Chernobyl: The Untold Story of the World’s Greatest Nuclear Disaster" Everyone who’s gotten past 8th grade has heard of Chernobyl and the accident at the nuclear power plant. But author Adam Higginbotham introduces a new perspective on what happened there, telling stories that have literally never been told before. Hear the Elephants(originally airedAugust 6, 2019) Guest: Joyce Poole, elephant ethologist, conservationsist, and Co-Director, ElephantVoices Joyce Poole can translate ele...

-1 s1 weeks ago
Comments
Milk and Economics, Prehistoric Baby Bottles, Beast So Fierce

Before Noah, Little Women, Roald Dahl

What Did the Ark Look Like? Guest:Irving Finkel, Keeper of Ancient Mesopotamian Artifacts, The British Museum, and author, "The Ark Before Noah: Decoding the Story of the Flood" The Noah’s Ark story you grew up with is not the only such story. Some of the oldest texts we have, carved on Mesopotamian clay tablets, are about 4,000 years old. But in this story, the boat was an enormous round "coracle." Symbolism Is All Around Us Guest:Jonathan Pageau, Artist, Editor of The Orthodox Arts Journal, and Host of The Symbolic World podcast Symbolism surrounds us—it has been a central part of our culture, and continues to be through today. Sometimes symbolism is part of a participant's experience and sometimes it's part of a passive viewing experience. The Weird and Wonderful World of Roald Dahl Guest: Rachel Wadham, Education and Juvenile Literature Librarian, Brigham Young University Roald Dahl had a traumatic childhood and his books tackle the injustice faced by kids, who find a way to o...

-1 s1 weeks ago
Comments
Before Noah, Little Women, Roald Dahl