title

TENNIS.com Podcast

TENNIS.com Podcast/Tennis Channel Podcast Network

13
Followers
11
Plays
TENNIS.com Podcast
TENNIS.com Podcast

TENNIS.com Podcast

TENNIS.com Podcast/Tennis Channel Podcast Network

13
Followers
11
Plays
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About Us

Tune in to hear the experts from Tennis.com and players on the tour talk about everything tennis, from happenings on the court to trending topics as well as what goes on behind the scenes both on the tour and in the pressroom.

Latest Episodes

Bob and Mike Bryan on retiring at the 2020 US Open

“I’m going to look forward tojust sharing these moments with my family. I told Micaela the plans for retirement—she actually was crying and she was like, 'You can still go back, if you’re retired you can still come back and play, right?' I'mlike, yeah, but it’s pretty final." On Wednesday, Bob and Mike Bryan announced that the 2020 season will be their final year on tour. They broke the news on Tennis Channel and sat down with the TENNIS.com Podcast's Nina Pantic and guest co-host TENNIS.com Senior Content Editor Matt Fitzgerald (Irina Falconi is playing the 125K Series in Houston). The twins dropped some more breaking news on the show: Bob Bryan is actually the older twin. For their entire lives, they thought Mike was older by a few minutes, but a closeinspection of Mike's birth certificate tells otherwise. "It said 'twin', but it said 'second,'' Mike said. "So for these 41 years, I've thought I'm the oldest twin, and we told everyone I'm two minutes older than Bob: Bob's actu...

31 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Bob and Mike Bryan on retiring at the 2020 US Open

Pete Bodo on the past, present and future of tennis journalism

"What's a little bit sad now really is that there's pressure to produce a lot, there's the pressure to producealmost on a 24-hour cycle, if you fall into it, certainly during the majors. And there's less and less engagement and human interaction [with] the players." Reporter and author Pete Bodo joins the TENNIS.com Podcast this week to talk the past, present and future of tennis journalism with co-hosts Nina Pantic and Irina Falconi. With nearly five decades of experience, Bodo has seen icons and eras come and go, and gives his takeon how the sport will fare once the Big Three retires, and if Coco Gauff is the real deal.He got his start writing in the early 1970sin the heart of the tennis boom (the first match he covered on the road was Rod Laver vs. Ken Rosewall). In the peak of print journalism, Bodo spentquality time—often days—with the likes of Tracy Austin, Chris Evert, Boris Becker and many more legends of the game, just to write features. He describes an era of media that relied heavily on real-life player and writer relationships, not Tweets and Instagram likes. Like everyone, Bodo has had to adapt with the changing of the times, especiallytheincreasing limitations on player access and the explosion of social media. Bodo is also author of multiple books including The Courts of Babylon (1995),A Champion's Mind: Lessons From A Life In Tennis, withPete Sampras (2008) andRoger Federer: The Man, The Matches, The Rivals (2013). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

38 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Pete Bodo on the past, present and future of tennis journalism

Eddie Elliott on helping Lauren Davis return to the Top 70

"A lot of times it’s like I’m trying to live my best life—whether it’s working out, having a positive approach after matches, before matches, having a positive attitude at tournaments. Because that’s a big thing I feel on tour, your player feeds off of that type of energy." This week's TENNIS.com Podcast guest is Eddie Elliott, the coach of American pro Lauren Davis. Elliott joined the WTA tour in July of 2018, helping Davisrise from outside of the Top 250 to No. 62. Elliott grew up playing tennis in Juno Beach with podcast co-hosts Nina Pantic and Irina Falconi, under the guidance of former world No. 7 Brenda Schultz-McCarthy. The 30-year-old played at Northwood University and Appalachian State, and was the director ofSchultz's tennis camp and a coach for her high-performance program. Hespentthree years away from tennis as a real estate agent before being drawn back in. Through his connections with Schultz and Davis' former coach Mark Schanerman, Elliott began working with Davis full time last year, just after she took a break from the tour forthe clay-court season. Davis' ranking has steadily risen in2019, as she won an ITF $100Kin Bonita Springs, Fla. and upset defending champion Angelique Kerber at Wimbledon.In his rookie year, Elliott navigated through a lot of unfamiliar territorywith the help ofresources like Schultz,his positive attitude and a healthy work-life balance that includesfishing, surfingand bowhunting hobbies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

29 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Eddie Elliott on helping Lauren Davis return to the Top 70

Noah Rubin on finding happiness in the grind

"I got to my career-high ranking at about No. 120 in the world. Not a lot changed… I just didn’t feel, I say this line all the time, but I didn’t feel—even at that point where I was at my best—that tennis was conducive to happiness." Noah Rubin appearson the TENNIS.com Podcast this week with Nina Pantic and Irina Falconi. The 23-year-old New Yorker has been ranked as high as No. 125in the world, and is the mastermind behind Behind the Racquet. Rubin won the 2014 junior Wimbledon title, dominated for one year at Wake Forest and then took his talents to the pro tour at 19,where he has capturedfour ATP Challengers. This year,herealized that prioritizing happiness and mental health was more important to him than obsessing over forehands and ranking points. Not afraid to speak his mind, Rubin is doing his part to dissipate the stigma around mental health and is using his podcast with Mike Cation, Coffee Cast, and Behind the Racquet to give players safer spaces to be more open. He ju...

38 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Noah Rubin on finding happiness in the grind

Nick McCarvel on covering the sport in new ways

"It's just that sort of natural approach that I've always had and, yeah, it's taken some fine-tuning. For the most part, it's just breaking down that fourth wall and letting the viewer feel like they're there with you." This week's TENNIS.com Podcast features reporter Nick McCarvel. He's got a lot of stories from the road to share with podcast co-hosts Nina Pantic and Irina Falconi. While studying journalism, McCarvel got his start in tennis by walking into the Tennis Magazine offices in Manhattan asking for a summer internship, and soon after, he beganwriting for the New York Times and USA Today. He made the leap to on-camera hosting at Indian Wells a few years ago, and has never looked back. Beyondtennis,he also covers figure skating, taking on the role of NBC Olympics digital reporter last year inPyeongchang. McCarvel hascarved out his place as acontent creator, commentator and host, oftentaking oversocial media with his feature videos and interviews. Hehas become a smiling stapleat seemingly every stop on tour and hasworked with everybig name in tennis—even chatting withRoger Federer and Serena Williams in the Twitter Blue Room after they won their Australian Open titles in 2017. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

34 MINOCT 16
Comments
Nick McCarvel on covering the sport in new ways

Jim Courier on making tennis better for everyone

"The business side has been something that I’ve been really educated in. I didn’t go to college, so for me it’s been a real learning curve and a real wonderful one to understand how the world of tennis actually operates. It's made me a better person in general." This week's TENNIS.com Podcast guest is former No. 1 Jim Courier. The four-time Grand Slam champion may be better known these days for commentating as he's now 20 years into a full-fledged broadcasting career. With his company InsideOut Sports & Entertainment, Courier has helped bring tennis to more people, first with the Powershares Champion Series (now the Invesco Series QQQ) and now by partnering with the Oracle Pro Series. The 49-year-old American shares how he knew it was time to retire, the ins and outs of commentating and his most memorable on-court interviews, including with Petra Kvitova and Rafael Nadal in Melbourne. He gets into some of the more complex debates of the sport like the delegation of prize money at...

44 MINOCT 9
Comments
Jim Courier on making tennis better for everyone

Anne Worcester on becoming UTR's president

"The chance to use use 35 years on all sides of pro tennis—the player side, the tournament side, the sponsor side, my Virginia Slims days and then the governing body side—to make a difference and grow the sport, using technology, was just sort of the chance of a lifetime." With over three decades of experience in pro tennis, Anne Worcester joins the TENNIS.com Podcast this week with co-hosts Nina Pantic and Irina Falconi. In the world of tennis, Worcester has done it all and shares her impressive path from recreational player to one of he most well-connected leaders in the game. Worcester became the first woman to be named the CEO of the WTA in 1994, making her the first female CEO of any major sports organization at the time.She then became the tournament director of the WTA Premier in New Haven in 1998, and remained the lead of the much-loved August event until it was sold to China earlier this year. Left to enjoy her first summer off in over 20 years, the highly-in-demand busin...

31 MINOCT 2
Comments
Anne Worcester on becoming UTR's president

Craig Kardon on the coaching carousel

“That’s one of the things I learned right away is you have to be willing to go on the court every single day and get fired, and stick up for what you believe in." This week's TENNIS.com Podcast guest is WTA and ATP coach Craig Kardon. With 30 years of experience on tour, Kardon has a lot of stories to share with podcast co-hosts Nina Pantic and Irina Falconi. A former Top 300-ranked pro, Kardon got his pro coaching career started in the late 1980s helping none other than Martina Navratilova to her final Wimbledon title in 1990. He has since worked with Mary Pierce, Lindsay Davenport, Jennifer Capriati, Ana Ivanovic, Xavier Malisse, Alex Bogomolov, CoCo Vandeweghe and more. He has been a fixture in World TeamTennis for nearly 20 years, spending the last decade guiding the Billie Jean King-owned Philadelphia Freedoms. Kardon shares how he got his first gig, and why coaches struggle to hold onto any sort of steady work on tour with the coaching carousel spitting out changes seemingly...

35 MINSEP 25
Comments
Craig Kardon on the coaching carousel

Mary Carillo on acing the broadcasting world

"Say yes! If you can’t do it they’ll tap you on the shoulder and get you gone, but just say yes. Experience it and work hard and be curious and do your thing, say yes." This week's TENNIS.com Podcast features award-winning broadcaster Mary Carillo. After a playing career that saw her reach No. 31 in the world, Carillo fell into commentating by happenstance, and then jumped into the new career headfirst in 1980. She has appeared on Tennis Channel, Amazon Prime, ESPN, NBC, CBS and many more, covering primarily tennis, but also Olympic events like figure skating, luge, skiing, marathon swimming and practically everything else. Not stopping at two-legged athletes, Carillo loves covering animal shows, too, including the upcoming AKC National Championship Dog Show on Animal Planet. Carillo covers a lot of ground this episode including how she got her start in the business, her advice to aspiring broadcasters, who made her the most starstruck, why she's not on social media and a lot, lot...

51 MINSEP 18
Comments
Mary Carillo on acing the broadcasting world

Sascha Bajin on working with Grand Slam champions

"Getting paid playing with Serena Williams on a daily basis, I don't care if it's in Palm Beach Gardens or a stadium, it doesn't get much than that." Sascha Bajin joined the TENNIS.com Podcast with Nina Pantic and Irina Falconi while he was in New York for the US Open. The 34-year-old has a decorated resume, having worked with Serena Williams, Victoria Azarenka, Caroline Wozniacki, Sloane Stephens, Naomi Osaka and now, Kristina Mladenovic. The German reflects on how he got his start as a 21-year-old hitting partner for one of the greatest athletes of all time. He would be part of Serena's team for 13 of her 23 Grand Slam wins. He explains how he made the shift to coaching, as he was in Osaka's player box as her coach for her 2018 US Open and 2019 Australian Open victories. Coaching was a natural fit for him thanks to a selfless demeanor that makes him eager to help his player with everything and anything she needs, from picking up laundry to figuring out how to win a match during a ...

33 MINSEP 11
Comments
Sascha Bajin on working with Grand Slam champions

Latest Episodes

Bob and Mike Bryan on retiring at the 2020 US Open

“I’m going to look forward tojust sharing these moments with my family. I told Micaela the plans for retirement—she actually was crying and she was like, 'You can still go back, if you’re retired you can still come back and play, right?' I'mlike, yeah, but it’s pretty final." On Wednesday, Bob and Mike Bryan announced that the 2020 season will be their final year on tour. They broke the news on Tennis Channel and sat down with the TENNIS.com Podcast's Nina Pantic and guest co-host TENNIS.com Senior Content Editor Matt Fitzgerald (Irina Falconi is playing the 125K Series in Houston). The twins dropped some more breaking news on the show: Bob Bryan is actually the older twin. For their entire lives, they thought Mike was older by a few minutes, but a closeinspection of Mike's birth certificate tells otherwise. "It said 'twin', but it said 'second,'' Mike said. "So for these 41 years, I've thought I'm the oldest twin, and we told everyone I'm two minutes older than Bob: Bob's actu...

31 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Bob and Mike Bryan on retiring at the 2020 US Open

Pete Bodo on the past, present and future of tennis journalism

"What's a little bit sad now really is that there's pressure to produce a lot, there's the pressure to producealmost on a 24-hour cycle, if you fall into it, certainly during the majors. And there's less and less engagement and human interaction [with] the players." Reporter and author Pete Bodo joins the TENNIS.com Podcast this week to talk the past, present and future of tennis journalism with co-hosts Nina Pantic and Irina Falconi. With nearly five decades of experience, Bodo has seen icons and eras come and go, and gives his takeon how the sport will fare once the Big Three retires, and if Coco Gauff is the real deal.He got his start writing in the early 1970sin the heart of the tennis boom (the first match he covered on the road was Rod Laver vs. Ken Rosewall). In the peak of print journalism, Bodo spentquality time—often days—with the likes of Tracy Austin, Chris Evert, Boris Becker and many more legends of the game, just to write features. He describes an era of media that relied heavily on real-life player and writer relationships, not Tweets and Instagram likes. Like everyone, Bodo has had to adapt with the changing of the times, especiallytheincreasing limitations on player access and the explosion of social media. Bodo is also author of multiple books including The Courts of Babylon (1995),A Champion's Mind: Lessons From A Life In Tennis, withPete Sampras (2008) andRoger Federer: The Man, The Matches, The Rivals (2013). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

38 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Pete Bodo on the past, present and future of tennis journalism

Eddie Elliott on helping Lauren Davis return to the Top 70

"A lot of times it’s like I’m trying to live my best life—whether it’s working out, having a positive approach after matches, before matches, having a positive attitude at tournaments. Because that’s a big thing I feel on tour, your player feeds off of that type of energy." This week's TENNIS.com Podcast guest is Eddie Elliott, the coach of American pro Lauren Davis. Elliott joined the WTA tour in July of 2018, helping Davisrise from outside of the Top 250 to No. 62. Elliott grew up playing tennis in Juno Beach with podcast co-hosts Nina Pantic and Irina Falconi, under the guidance of former world No. 7 Brenda Schultz-McCarthy. The 30-year-old played at Northwood University and Appalachian State, and was the director ofSchultz's tennis camp and a coach for her high-performance program. Hespentthree years away from tennis as a real estate agent before being drawn back in. Through his connections with Schultz and Davis' former coach Mark Schanerman, Elliott began working with Davis full time last year, just after she took a break from the tour forthe clay-court season. Davis' ranking has steadily risen in2019, as she won an ITF $100Kin Bonita Springs, Fla. and upset defending champion Angelique Kerber at Wimbledon.In his rookie year, Elliott navigated through a lot of unfamiliar territorywith the help ofresources like Schultz,his positive attitude and a healthy work-life balance that includesfishing, surfingand bowhunting hobbies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

29 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Eddie Elliott on helping Lauren Davis return to the Top 70

Noah Rubin on finding happiness in the grind

"I got to my career-high ranking at about No. 120 in the world. Not a lot changed… I just didn’t feel, I say this line all the time, but I didn’t feel—even at that point where I was at my best—that tennis was conducive to happiness." Noah Rubin appearson the TENNIS.com Podcast this week with Nina Pantic and Irina Falconi. The 23-year-old New Yorker has been ranked as high as No. 125in the world, and is the mastermind behind Behind the Racquet. Rubin won the 2014 junior Wimbledon title, dominated for one year at Wake Forest and then took his talents to the pro tour at 19,where he has capturedfour ATP Challengers. This year,herealized that prioritizing happiness and mental health was more important to him than obsessing over forehands and ranking points. Not afraid to speak his mind, Rubin is doing his part to dissipate the stigma around mental health and is using his podcast with Mike Cation, Coffee Cast, and Behind the Racquet to give players safer spaces to be more open. He ju...

38 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Noah Rubin on finding happiness in the grind

Nick McCarvel on covering the sport in new ways

"It's just that sort of natural approach that I've always had and, yeah, it's taken some fine-tuning. For the most part, it's just breaking down that fourth wall and letting the viewer feel like they're there with you." This week's TENNIS.com Podcast features reporter Nick McCarvel. He's got a lot of stories from the road to share with podcast co-hosts Nina Pantic and Irina Falconi. While studying journalism, McCarvel got his start in tennis by walking into the Tennis Magazine offices in Manhattan asking for a summer internship, and soon after, he beganwriting for the New York Times and USA Today. He made the leap to on-camera hosting at Indian Wells a few years ago, and has never looked back. Beyondtennis,he also covers figure skating, taking on the role of NBC Olympics digital reporter last year inPyeongchang. McCarvel hascarved out his place as acontent creator, commentator and host, oftentaking oversocial media with his feature videos and interviews. Hehas become a smiling stapleat seemingly every stop on tour and hasworked with everybig name in tennis—even chatting withRoger Federer and Serena Williams in the Twitter Blue Room after they won their Australian Open titles in 2017. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

34 MINOCT 16
Comments
Nick McCarvel on covering the sport in new ways

Jim Courier on making tennis better for everyone

"The business side has been something that I’ve been really educated in. I didn’t go to college, so for me it’s been a real learning curve and a real wonderful one to understand how the world of tennis actually operates. It's made me a better person in general." This week's TENNIS.com Podcast guest is former No. 1 Jim Courier. The four-time Grand Slam champion may be better known these days for commentating as he's now 20 years into a full-fledged broadcasting career. With his company InsideOut Sports & Entertainment, Courier has helped bring tennis to more people, first with the Powershares Champion Series (now the Invesco Series QQQ) and now by partnering with the Oracle Pro Series. The 49-year-old American shares how he knew it was time to retire, the ins and outs of commentating and his most memorable on-court interviews, including with Petra Kvitova and Rafael Nadal in Melbourne. He gets into some of the more complex debates of the sport like the delegation of prize money at...

44 MINOCT 9
Comments
Jim Courier on making tennis better for everyone

Anne Worcester on becoming UTR's president

"The chance to use use 35 years on all sides of pro tennis—the player side, the tournament side, the sponsor side, my Virginia Slims days and then the governing body side—to make a difference and grow the sport, using technology, was just sort of the chance of a lifetime." With over three decades of experience in pro tennis, Anne Worcester joins the TENNIS.com Podcast this week with co-hosts Nina Pantic and Irina Falconi. In the world of tennis, Worcester has done it all and shares her impressive path from recreational player to one of he most well-connected leaders in the game. Worcester became the first woman to be named the CEO of the WTA in 1994, making her the first female CEO of any major sports organization at the time.She then became the tournament director of the WTA Premier in New Haven in 1998, and remained the lead of the much-loved August event until it was sold to China earlier this year. Left to enjoy her first summer off in over 20 years, the highly-in-demand busin...

31 MINOCT 2
Comments
Anne Worcester on becoming UTR's president

Craig Kardon on the coaching carousel

“That’s one of the things I learned right away is you have to be willing to go on the court every single day and get fired, and stick up for what you believe in." This week's TENNIS.com Podcast guest is WTA and ATP coach Craig Kardon. With 30 years of experience on tour, Kardon has a lot of stories to share with podcast co-hosts Nina Pantic and Irina Falconi. A former Top 300-ranked pro, Kardon got his pro coaching career started in the late 1980s helping none other than Martina Navratilova to her final Wimbledon title in 1990. He has since worked with Mary Pierce, Lindsay Davenport, Jennifer Capriati, Ana Ivanovic, Xavier Malisse, Alex Bogomolov, CoCo Vandeweghe and more. He has been a fixture in World TeamTennis for nearly 20 years, spending the last decade guiding the Billie Jean King-owned Philadelphia Freedoms. Kardon shares how he got his first gig, and why coaches struggle to hold onto any sort of steady work on tour with the coaching carousel spitting out changes seemingly...

35 MINSEP 25
Comments
Craig Kardon on the coaching carousel

Mary Carillo on acing the broadcasting world

"Say yes! If you can’t do it they’ll tap you on the shoulder and get you gone, but just say yes. Experience it and work hard and be curious and do your thing, say yes." This week's TENNIS.com Podcast features award-winning broadcaster Mary Carillo. After a playing career that saw her reach No. 31 in the world, Carillo fell into commentating by happenstance, and then jumped into the new career headfirst in 1980. She has appeared on Tennis Channel, Amazon Prime, ESPN, NBC, CBS and many more, covering primarily tennis, but also Olympic events like figure skating, luge, skiing, marathon swimming and practically everything else. Not stopping at two-legged athletes, Carillo loves covering animal shows, too, including the upcoming AKC National Championship Dog Show on Animal Planet. Carillo covers a lot of ground this episode including how she got her start in the business, her advice to aspiring broadcasters, who made her the most starstruck, why she's not on social media and a lot, lot...

51 MINSEP 18
Comments
Mary Carillo on acing the broadcasting world

Sascha Bajin on working with Grand Slam champions

"Getting paid playing with Serena Williams on a daily basis, I don't care if it's in Palm Beach Gardens or a stadium, it doesn't get much than that." Sascha Bajin joined the TENNIS.com Podcast with Nina Pantic and Irina Falconi while he was in New York for the US Open. The 34-year-old has a decorated resume, having worked with Serena Williams, Victoria Azarenka, Caroline Wozniacki, Sloane Stephens, Naomi Osaka and now, Kristina Mladenovic. The German reflects on how he got his start as a 21-year-old hitting partner for one of the greatest athletes of all time. He would be part of Serena's team for 13 of her 23 Grand Slam wins. He explains how he made the shift to coaching, as he was in Osaka's player box as her coach for her 2018 US Open and 2019 Australian Open victories. Coaching was a natural fit for him thanks to a selfless demeanor that makes him eager to help his player with everything and anything she needs, from picking up laundry to figuring out how to win a match during a ...

33 MINSEP 11
Comments
Sascha Bajin on working with Grand Slam champions
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