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Let's Talk About Myths, Baby! A Greek & Roman Mythology Podcast

Liv, Greek Mythology Geek

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2.7K
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Let's Talk About Myths, Baby! A Greek & Roman Mythology Podcast

Let's Talk About Myths, Baby! A Greek & Roman Mythology Podcast

Liv, Greek Mythology Geek

420
Followers
2.7K
Plays
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About Us

The most entertaining and enraging stories from mythology told casually, contemporarily, and (let's be honest) sarcastically. Greek and Roman gods did some pretty weird (and awful) things. This isn't your average storytelling podcast: Liv focuses on Greek and Roman mythology's (mis)treatment of women, the insane things the gods did, and the all around incredible minds of the ancient world. I mean, how did they come up with this stuff? Gods, goddesses, heroes, monsters, and everything in between.

Latest Episodes

XCII: Augustus's Rome, Carthage & the History of Virgil's Dido (with Ancient History Fangirl!)

In this special episode devoted to even more on the queen of Carthage, Dido, Liv teams up with Genn and Jenny of Ancient History Fangirl for a rundown of why Rome "needed" so much Augustan propaganda, and what that means for the real Carthage and the mythological Dido. There's drunken elephants, loathing of Julius Caesar, gossip about Augustus's family, Cleopatra, Ovid, and of course, Dido. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. To listen to more of Genn and Jenny, subscribe to Ancient History Fangirl wherever you get your podcasts! ancienthistoryfangirl.com Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

67 min1 d ago
Comments
XCII: Augustus's Rome, Carthage & the History of Virgil's Dido (with Ancient History Fangirl!)

Liv Reads Homer: The Odyssey Book I

ELiv reads Book 1 of the Odyssey, translated into prose by Samuel Butler. This is not a standard episode, it's simply a reading of the Odyssey. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads Homer..." in the title! This translation uses the Roman names for gods and heroes. Here's a list Greek to Roman names to help you out: Zeus = Jove/Jupiter Hera = Juno Athena = Minerva/Pallas Minerva Ares = Mars Aphrodite = Venus (Cyprian goddess); also sometimes her mother is Dione Poseidon = Neptune Hades = Pluto Hermes = Mercury Kronos = Saturn Artemis = Diana Leto = Latona Hephaestus = Vulcan Heracles = Hercules Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

24 min5 d ago
Comments
Liv Reads Homer: The Odyssey Book I

RE-AIR Mini Myth: Who Let a Woman Found a City?! Dido Beyond the Aeneid

EDue to some technical difficulties, this is a re-airing of an earlier episode. There's more to Queen Dido than Virgil tells us in the Aeneid, she had a life before Aeneas came to town, if you can believe it! This mini myth covers the story of Dido's founding of Carthage outside of what is told in the Aeneid. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Roman Mythology, a Traveler's Guide from Troy to Tivoli by David Stuttard; https://www.ancient.eu/Dido/. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

14 min1 w ago
Comments
RE-AIR Mini Myth: Who Let a Woman Found a City?! Dido Beyond the Aeneid

Liv Reads the Iliad: Book XXIV

ELiv reads Book 24 of the Iliad, translated into prose by Samuel Butler. This is not a standard episode, it's simply a reading of the Iliad. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads the..." in the title! This translation uses the Roman names for gods and heroes. Here's a list Greek to Roman names to help you out: Zeus = Jove/Jupiter Hera = Juno Athena = Minerva/Pallas Minerva Ares = Mars Aphrodite = Venus (Cyprian goddess); also sometimes her mother is Dione Poseidon = Neptune Hades = Pluto Hermes = Mercury Kronos = Saturn Artemis = Diana Leto = Latona Hephaestus = Vulcan Odysseus = Ulysses (I think he's the only mortal with a name change, the Romans were weird) Heracles = Hercules (Not Latin, but Achaeans/Danaans = Greeks, Argives = from Argos, Ilius = Troy, Dardanian = ally of Troy, Alexandrus = Paris) Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

46 min1 w ago
Comments
Liv Reads the Iliad: Book XXIV

XCI: No Earthly Ships, the Tragedy of the Aeneid’s Dido (The Aeneid Part 7)

EDido's fate is determined by Aeneas's stubbornness and the far too potent love spell of Venus... Things get sad and dark for Carthage. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Virgil's Aeneid, translated by Sarah Ruden; the Dido song mentioned is called My Lover's Gone. Sponsors! For 50% off your first Care/Of order go to TakeCareOf.com and enter code MYTHSBABY50. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

28 min2 w ago
Comments
XCI: No Earthly Ships, the Tragedy of the Aeneid’s Dido (The Aeneid Part 7)

Liv Reads the Iliad: Book XXIII

Liv reads Book 23 of the Iliad, translated into prose by Samuel Butler. This is not a standard episode, it's simply a reading of the Iliad. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads the..." in the title! This translation uses the Roman names for gods and heroes. Here's a list Greek to Roman names to help you out: Zeus = Jove/Jupiter Hera = Juno Athena = Minerva/Pallas Minerva Ares = Mars Aphrodite = Venus (Cyprian goddess); also sometimes her mother is Dione Poseidon = Neptune Hades = Pluto Hermes = Mercury Kronos = Saturn Artemis = Diana Leto = Latona Hephaestus = Vulcan Odysseus = Ulysses (I think he's the only mortal with a name change, the Romans were weird) Heracles = Hercules (Not Latin, but Achaeans/Danaans = Greeks, Argives = from Argos, Ilius = Troy, Dardanian = ally of Troy, Alexandrus = Paris) Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and ...

48 min2 w ago
Comments
Liv Reads the Iliad: Book XXIII

A Reading of the Homeric Hymn to Hermes

EThis is a bonus reading of the Homeric Hymn to Hermes to accompany today's episode on Hermes. This Homeric Hymn tells the story of the birth of Hermes and all the adventures he had as a newborn baby (they were plentiful). It's sometimes attributed to Homer, but comes from a similar time period in any case. This translation is by Hugh Evelyn-White and is in the Public Domain. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

30 min3 w ago
Comments
A Reading of the Homeric Hymn to Hermes

XC: The Trickster God Hermes, the Original Baby Genius

EHermes is a pretty incredible newborn. He invents the lyre, steals some cattle, lies through his teeth, all within mere moments of birth! (Also, it's a tortoise). Please listen to this episode before the Homeric Hymn to Hermes. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Theoi.com, the Homeric Hymn to Hermes, translated by Hugh Evelyn-White and Jules Cashford, the Greek Myths by Robert Graves. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

22 min3 w ago
Comments
XC: The Trickster God Hermes, the Original Baby Genius

Liv Reads the Iliad: Book XXII

Liv reads Book 22 of the Iliad, translated into prose by Samuel Butler. This is not a standard episode, it's simply a reading of the Iliad. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads the..." in the title! This translation uses the Roman names for gods and heroes. Here's a list Greek to Roman names to help you out: Zeus = Jove/Jupiter Hera = Juno Athena = Minerva/Pallas Minerva Ares = Mars Aphrodite = Venus (Cyprian goddess); also sometimes her mother is Dione Poseidon = Neptune Hades = Pluto Hermes = Mercury Kronos = Saturn Artemis = Diana Leto = Latona Hephaestus = Vulcan Odysseus = Ulysses (I think he's the only mortal with a name change, the Romans were weird) Heracles = Hercules (Not Latin, but Achaeans/Danaans = Greeks, Argives = from Argos, Ilius = Troy, Dardanian = ally of Troy, Alexandrus = Paris) Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and ...

32 min3 w ago
Comments
Liv Reads the Iliad: Book XXII

LXXXIX: Dido Wonders Why She Got Out of Bed At All (The Aeneid Part 6)

The "relationship" of Dido and Aeneas continues with the affects of the love potion only increasing. Juno and Venus begin to form a plan of how to handle Carthage. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Virgil's Aeneid, translated by Sarah Ruden. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

23 minAUG 25
Comments
LXXXIX: Dido Wonders Why She Got Out of Bed At All (The Aeneid Part 6)

Latest Episodes

XCII: Augustus's Rome, Carthage & the History of Virgil's Dido (with Ancient History Fangirl!)

In this special episode devoted to even more on the queen of Carthage, Dido, Liv teams up with Genn and Jenny of Ancient History Fangirl for a rundown of why Rome "needed" so much Augustan propaganda, and what that means for the real Carthage and the mythological Dido. There's drunken elephants, loathing of Julius Caesar, gossip about Augustus's family, Cleopatra, Ovid, and of course, Dido. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. To listen to more of Genn and Jenny, subscribe to Ancient History Fangirl wherever you get your podcasts! ancienthistoryfangirl.com Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

67 min1 d ago
Comments
XCII: Augustus's Rome, Carthage & the History of Virgil's Dido (with Ancient History Fangirl!)

Liv Reads Homer: The Odyssey Book I

ELiv reads Book 1 of the Odyssey, translated into prose by Samuel Butler. This is not a standard episode, it's simply a reading of the Odyssey. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads Homer..." in the title! This translation uses the Roman names for gods and heroes. Here's a list Greek to Roman names to help you out: Zeus = Jove/Jupiter Hera = Juno Athena = Minerva/Pallas Minerva Ares = Mars Aphrodite = Venus (Cyprian goddess); also sometimes her mother is Dione Poseidon = Neptune Hades = Pluto Hermes = Mercury Kronos = Saturn Artemis = Diana Leto = Latona Hephaestus = Vulcan Heracles = Hercules Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

24 min5 d ago
Comments
Liv Reads Homer: The Odyssey Book I

RE-AIR Mini Myth: Who Let a Woman Found a City?! Dido Beyond the Aeneid

EDue to some technical difficulties, this is a re-airing of an earlier episode. There's more to Queen Dido than Virgil tells us in the Aeneid, she had a life before Aeneas came to town, if you can believe it! This mini myth covers the story of Dido's founding of Carthage outside of what is told in the Aeneid. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Roman Mythology, a Traveler's Guide from Troy to Tivoli by David Stuttard; https://www.ancient.eu/Dido/. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

14 min1 w ago
Comments
RE-AIR Mini Myth: Who Let a Woman Found a City?! Dido Beyond the Aeneid

Liv Reads the Iliad: Book XXIV

ELiv reads Book 24 of the Iliad, translated into prose by Samuel Butler. This is not a standard episode, it's simply a reading of the Iliad. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads the..." in the title! This translation uses the Roman names for gods and heroes. Here's a list Greek to Roman names to help you out: Zeus = Jove/Jupiter Hera = Juno Athena = Minerva/Pallas Minerva Ares = Mars Aphrodite = Venus (Cyprian goddess); also sometimes her mother is Dione Poseidon = Neptune Hades = Pluto Hermes = Mercury Kronos = Saturn Artemis = Diana Leto = Latona Hephaestus = Vulcan Odysseus = Ulysses (I think he's the only mortal with a name change, the Romans were weird) Heracles = Hercules (Not Latin, but Achaeans/Danaans = Greeks, Argives = from Argos, Ilius = Troy, Dardanian = ally of Troy, Alexandrus = Paris) Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

46 min1 w ago
Comments
Liv Reads the Iliad: Book XXIV

XCI: No Earthly Ships, the Tragedy of the Aeneid’s Dido (The Aeneid Part 7)

EDido's fate is determined by Aeneas's stubbornness and the far too potent love spell of Venus... Things get sad and dark for Carthage. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Virgil's Aeneid, translated by Sarah Ruden; the Dido song mentioned is called My Lover's Gone. Sponsors! For 50% off your first Care/Of order go to TakeCareOf.com and enter code MYTHSBABY50. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

28 min2 w ago
Comments
XCI: No Earthly Ships, the Tragedy of the Aeneid’s Dido (The Aeneid Part 7)

Liv Reads the Iliad: Book XXIII

Liv reads Book 23 of the Iliad, translated into prose by Samuel Butler. This is not a standard episode, it's simply a reading of the Iliad. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads the..." in the title! This translation uses the Roman names for gods and heroes. Here's a list Greek to Roman names to help you out: Zeus = Jove/Jupiter Hera = Juno Athena = Minerva/Pallas Minerva Ares = Mars Aphrodite = Venus (Cyprian goddess); also sometimes her mother is Dione Poseidon = Neptune Hades = Pluto Hermes = Mercury Kronos = Saturn Artemis = Diana Leto = Latona Hephaestus = Vulcan Odysseus = Ulysses (I think he's the only mortal with a name change, the Romans were weird) Heracles = Hercules (Not Latin, but Achaeans/Danaans = Greeks, Argives = from Argos, Ilius = Troy, Dardanian = ally of Troy, Alexandrus = Paris) Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and ...

48 min2 w ago
Comments
Liv Reads the Iliad: Book XXIII

A Reading of the Homeric Hymn to Hermes

EThis is a bonus reading of the Homeric Hymn to Hermes to accompany today's episode on Hermes. This Homeric Hymn tells the story of the birth of Hermes and all the adventures he had as a newborn baby (they were plentiful). It's sometimes attributed to Homer, but comes from a similar time period in any case. This translation is by Hugh Evelyn-White and is in the Public Domain. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

30 min3 w ago
Comments
A Reading of the Homeric Hymn to Hermes

XC: The Trickster God Hermes, the Original Baby Genius

EHermes is a pretty incredible newborn. He invents the lyre, steals some cattle, lies through his teeth, all within mere moments of birth! (Also, it's a tortoise). Please listen to this episode before the Homeric Hymn to Hermes. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Theoi.com, the Homeric Hymn to Hermes, translated by Hugh Evelyn-White and Jules Cashford, the Greek Myths by Robert Graves. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

22 min3 w ago
Comments
XC: The Trickster God Hermes, the Original Baby Genius

Liv Reads the Iliad: Book XXII

Liv reads Book 22 of the Iliad, translated into prose by Samuel Butler. This is not a standard episode, it's simply a reading of the Iliad. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads the..." in the title! This translation uses the Roman names for gods and heroes. Here's a list Greek to Roman names to help you out: Zeus = Jove/Jupiter Hera = Juno Athena = Minerva/Pallas Minerva Ares = Mars Aphrodite = Venus (Cyprian goddess); also sometimes her mother is Dione Poseidon = Neptune Hades = Pluto Hermes = Mercury Kronos = Saturn Artemis = Diana Leto = Latona Hephaestus = Vulcan Odysseus = Ulysses (I think he's the only mortal with a name change, the Romans were weird) Heracles = Hercules (Not Latin, but Achaeans/Danaans = Greeks, Argives = from Argos, Ilius = Troy, Dardanian = ally of Troy, Alexandrus = Paris) Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and ...

32 min3 w ago
Comments
Liv Reads the Iliad: Book XXII

LXXXIX: Dido Wonders Why She Got Out of Bed At All (The Aeneid Part 6)

The "relationship" of Dido and Aeneas continues with the affects of the love potion only increasing. Juno and Venus begin to form a plan of how to handle Carthage. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Virgil's Aeneid, translated by Sarah Ruden. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

23 minAUG 25
Comments
LXXXIX: Dido Wonders Why She Got Out of Bed At All (The Aeneid Part 6)

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