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Slate Culture

Slate Podcasts

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Slate Culture

Slate Culture

Slate Podcasts

143
Followers
847
Plays
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Get the Culture Gabfest and all of Slate's culture coverage here.

Latest Episodes

Working: Jordan Peele’s Film Composer is Terrified of Scary Movies

EThis week, host Isaac Butler talks to composer Michael Abels about what it’s like to write music for suspenseful movies like Get Out, Us, and the recent HBO movie Bad Education, starring Hugh Jackman and Allison Janney. In the interview, Michael digs into the collaborative nature of film scoring and offers tips on how to capture your creativity. After the interview, Isaac and co-host Rumaan Alam talk about the music they listen to when they’re doing creative work. Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com Podcast production by Cameron Drews And if you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on Working. It’s only $35 for the first year, and you can get a free two-week trial. Sign up nowto help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

51 MIN1 d ago
Comments
Working: Jordan Peele’s Film Composer is Terrified of Scary Movies

Spoiler Specials: An American Pickle

EOn the Spoiler Special podcast, Slate critics discuss movies, the occasional TV show, and, once in a blue moon, another podcast, in full spoiler-filled detail. This week, Dana Stevens, Slate’s movie critic, is joined by Isaac Butler, writer, theater director, and co-host of Slate’s podcast Working, to spoil An American Pickle. Seth Rogen stars as Herschel Greenbaum, a man who wakes up after being preserved in pickle brine for a century, and Ben Greenbaum, Herschel’s only living descendant. Can Herschel adapt to the contemporary world? Will Ben and Herschel bond despite generational and value differences? How convincing is Seth Rogen as both of these men? You can read Marissa Martinelli’s interview with An American Pickle’s prop master here. You can read Matthew Dessem’s piece on pickle related catastrophes here. Note: As the title indicates, this podcast contains spoilers galore. Email us at spoilers@slate.com. Podcast production by Rosemary Belson. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts and access to exclusive shows like Dana Stevens’ classic movies podcast Flashback. Sign up now to listen and support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

42 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Spoiler Specials: An American Pickle

Thirst Aid Kit: Rakes, Sheikhs, Shipping Magnates

EWe’ve long talked about our love for romance novels and in this episode we are going deep: talking about the changing aesthetics of romance novels, the increased visibility of our favourite tropes and sub-genres, and the heroes and heroines that we love to see. In our Plus segment, we take begrudging inspiration from our times and look at how movies have treated love at a distance. The Truth About Cats and Dogs, 40 Days and 40 Nights, and The Age of Innocence all keep our main couples apart somehow and yet they manage to find ways to ease the physical ache of love and attraction. As usual, you can follow us on Twitter @ThirstAidKit. Our music is by Tanya Morgan. You can find show notes, and more on our Tumblr at thirstaidkitpodcast.tumblr.com. Don’t forget to send us your drabbles by emailing thirstaidkit@slate.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

56 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Thirst Aid Kit: Rakes, Sheikhs, Shipping Magnates

Culture Gabfest: Folklorn

EOn this week’s episode, Steve, Dana, and Julia are joined by Slate’s music critic Carl Wilson to take on Taylor Swift’s Folklore. Then, the panelists discusses school reopenings, riffing off of Dana’s recent op-ed for the Washington Post. Finally, they break down this week’s comfort watch—the 1936 screwball comedy, My Man Godfrey. In Slate Plus, the hosts are joined by Slate staff writer Lili Loofbourow to discuss her recent pieces on cancel culture and online debate. Slate Plus members get a bonus segment on theCultureGabfest each episode, and access to exclusiveshowslike Dana Stevens’ classic movies podcast Flashback.Sign up nowto listen and support our work. Other items discussed in this show: “Taylor Swift’s New Album Reveals That Social Distancing Has Served Her Well” by Carl Wilson in Slate “Held back: As parents realize how badly the U.S. botched the next school year, we’re furious” by Dana Stevens in the Washington Post “The Cancel Culture Trap” by Lili Loofbourow in Slate “Illiberalism Isn’t to Blame for the Death of Good-Faith Debate” by Lili Loofbourow in Slate Endorsements: Dana: Dana’s original drink “This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison,” inspired by a Samuel Taylor Coleridge poem. To make the cordial, boil a 2:1 ratio of lime juice to water on stove until reduced to half. Sweeten to taste. Mix with bourbon or rye whiskey. Throw in basil or mint leaf as garnish. Julia: Strand by the Spinanes, especially “Winter on Ice.” Steve: “Publish and Perish” by Agnes Callard in the Point. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Rachael Allen. Outro Music: Back to Silence by OTE Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

63 MIN5 d ago
Comments
Culture Gabfest: Folklorn

Working: The Immersive Sounds of Audio Drama

EThis week, host June Thomas talks about her deep love of audio fiction with longtime radio and podcast writer-producer John Scott Dryden. First, they discuss the U.K. origins of the genre and the growing appetite for audio fiction in the U.S. Then they dig into John’s production process and discuss how he creates immersive stories using sounds and voices from all over the world. After the interview, June and co-host Rumaan Alam answer a question from a listener. Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. And if you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on Working. It’s only $35 for the first year, and you can get a free two-week trial. Sign up nowto help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

46 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Working: The Immersive Sounds of Audio Drama

Hit Parade: What a Fool Believes Edition

ELike many media organizations at the moment, Slate is getting hit pretty hard by what's going on with the economy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. We want to continue doing our work, providing you with all our great podcasts, news and reporting, and we simply cannot do that without your support. So we're asking you to sign up for Slate Plus, our membership program. It's just $35 for the first year, and it goes a long way to supporting us in this crucial moment. In the late ’70s and early ’80s, a scene and a sound cropped up on the West Coast: polished, perfectionist studio musicians who generated sleek, jazzy, R&B-flavored music. About a quarter-century later, this sound was given a name: YachtRock. The inventors of the genre name weren’t thinking about boats…well, unless the song was Christopher Cross’s “Sailing.” Yacht Rock was meant to signify deluxe, yuppified, “smooth” music suitable for playing on luxury nautical craft. Whatever you call it, this music really did command the charts at the turn of the ’80s: from Steely Dan to George Benson, Michael McDonald to Kenny Loggins, Toto to…Michael Jackson?! Believe it: even Thriller is partially a Yacht Rock album. This month, Hit Parade breaks down what Yacht Rock was and how it took over the charts four decades ago—from the perfectionism of “Peg,” to the bounce of “What a Fool Believes,” to the epic smoothness of “Africa.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

8 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Hit Parade: What a Fool Believes Edition

Thirst Aid Kit: THIRSTMAIL VOL. 4

EIt’s never a bad move to hear from our thirsty yet oh-so-talented Thirst Buckets! Our audience is the best audience because they send us drabbles that make us swoon and giggle and we immediately put them aside so we can share the wealth on air. That’s what we’re doing with this episode— sharing listener-submitted drabbles about John Boyega, Aidan Turner, Pedro Pascal, Andy Samberg, and Seth Rogen. We also answer some questions from Tumblr and a couple of Thirst Sommelier requests. One listener needs someone with a Lin-Manuel Miranda vibe and someone else wants to replace Terry Crews on her thirst mood board. Luckily, we have a few suggestions we think will make everyone happy. In our Slate Plus segment, we break down quarantine beards: yay or nay? As usual, you can follow us on Twitter @ThirstAidKit. Our music is by Tanya Morgan. You can find show notes, and more on our Tumblr at thirstaidkitpodcast.tumblr.com. Don’t forget to send us your drabbles by emailing thirstaidkit@slate.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

59 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Thirst Aid Kit: THIRSTMAIL VOL. 4

Working: Adrian Tomine’s Drawings Tell Rich, Complex Stories

EThis week, host Rumaan Alam talks to cartoonist and New Yorker cover artist Adrian Tomine, who just released a graphic memoir called The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist. In the interview, Adrian talks about what it was like for his childhood hobby to become a full-time job, and how his art has evolved over the years. After the interview, co-host June Thomas interviews Slate writers Dahlia Lithwick and Molly Olmstead about a massive piece of journalism they’ve put together about the women in Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s class at Harvard Law School. To hear the audio version of the piece, subscribe to Slate’s Amicus podcast. Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com. And if you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on Working. It’s only $35 for the first year, and you can get a free two-week trial. Sign up nowto help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

59 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Working: Adrian Tomine’s Drawings Tell Rich, Complex Stories

Spoiler Specials: Palm Springs

EOn the Spoiler Special podcast, Slate critics discuss movies, the occasional TV show, and, once in a blue moon, another podcast, in full spoiler-filled detail. This week, Slate’s movie critic Dana Stevens is joined by Willa Paskin, Slate’s television critic, and Sam Adams, a senior editor at Slate and the editor of Slate’s culture blog, Brow Beat, to spoil Palm Springs. At first, Palm Springs seems like a fun wedding rom-com until Nyles (Andy Samberg) is shot with a bow and arrow while fooling around in the desert with Sarah (Cristin Milioti). Injured, he crawls into a nearby cave and tells Sarah not to follow him. She ignores his warning and is pulled into his infinite time loop. Will she follow Nyles’ lead and make peace with the situation? Why is Nyles being hunted? Why is Sarah so desperate to find a way out? And what is with those dinosaurs? You can read Sam’s interview with the theoretical physicist who consulted on the movie here. Note: As the title indicates, this podca...

51 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Spoiler Specials: Palm Springs

Thirst Aid Kit: Bim’s Thirst 123s

EIt’s Bim’s turn to delve into the roots of her thirst habits — and naturally, it turned out to be a journey through TV and film! Watching Tevin Campbell sing to Ashley on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air and falling in love with Dwayne Wayne on A Different World led naturally to a love for Capeside’s finest, Pacey Witter… and also the Blue Moon Agency’s David Addison (Bruce Willis). We also trace Bim’s love for a Strong Nose to David Duchovny (Red Shoe Diaries) and ER’s Dr Luka Kovac (Goran Višnjić). Thirst is complex, y’all. In our Plus segment, we take a look at some of the cliche ‘sexy time’ tropes in film and TV and why they work (or not): the wanton clearing of a desk (hello, Friends and also The Good Wife); the full-bodied slam against the wall/bookcase (Atonement, Always Be My Maybe, The Night Manager) and why we do NOT fool around with food. Join Slate Plus to find out why! Slate.com/thirstaidplus As usual, you can follow us on Twitter @ThirstAidKit. Our music is by ...

68 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Thirst Aid Kit: Bim’s Thirst 123s

Latest Episodes

Working: Jordan Peele’s Film Composer is Terrified of Scary Movies

EThis week, host Isaac Butler talks to composer Michael Abels about what it’s like to write music for suspenseful movies like Get Out, Us, and the recent HBO movie Bad Education, starring Hugh Jackman and Allison Janney. In the interview, Michael digs into the collaborative nature of film scoring and offers tips on how to capture your creativity. After the interview, Isaac and co-host Rumaan Alam talk about the music they listen to when they’re doing creative work. Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com Podcast production by Cameron Drews And if you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on Working. It’s only $35 for the first year, and you can get a free two-week trial. Sign up nowto help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

51 MIN1 d ago
Comments
Working: Jordan Peele’s Film Composer is Terrified of Scary Movies

Spoiler Specials: An American Pickle

EOn the Spoiler Special podcast, Slate critics discuss movies, the occasional TV show, and, once in a blue moon, another podcast, in full spoiler-filled detail. This week, Dana Stevens, Slate’s movie critic, is joined by Isaac Butler, writer, theater director, and co-host of Slate’s podcast Working, to spoil An American Pickle. Seth Rogen stars as Herschel Greenbaum, a man who wakes up after being preserved in pickle brine for a century, and Ben Greenbaum, Herschel’s only living descendant. Can Herschel adapt to the contemporary world? Will Ben and Herschel bond despite generational and value differences? How convincing is Seth Rogen as both of these men? You can read Marissa Martinelli’s interview with An American Pickle’s prop master here. You can read Matthew Dessem’s piece on pickle related catastrophes here. Note: As the title indicates, this podcast contains spoilers galore. Email us at spoilers@slate.com. Podcast production by Rosemary Belson. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts and access to exclusive shows like Dana Stevens’ classic movies podcast Flashback. Sign up now to listen and support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

42 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Spoiler Specials: An American Pickle

Thirst Aid Kit: Rakes, Sheikhs, Shipping Magnates

EWe’ve long talked about our love for romance novels and in this episode we are going deep: talking about the changing aesthetics of romance novels, the increased visibility of our favourite tropes and sub-genres, and the heroes and heroines that we love to see. In our Plus segment, we take begrudging inspiration from our times and look at how movies have treated love at a distance. The Truth About Cats and Dogs, 40 Days and 40 Nights, and The Age of Innocence all keep our main couples apart somehow and yet they manage to find ways to ease the physical ache of love and attraction. As usual, you can follow us on Twitter @ThirstAidKit. Our music is by Tanya Morgan. You can find show notes, and more on our Tumblr at thirstaidkitpodcast.tumblr.com. Don’t forget to send us your drabbles by emailing thirstaidkit@slate.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

56 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Thirst Aid Kit: Rakes, Sheikhs, Shipping Magnates

Culture Gabfest: Folklorn

EOn this week’s episode, Steve, Dana, and Julia are joined by Slate’s music critic Carl Wilson to take on Taylor Swift’s Folklore. Then, the panelists discusses school reopenings, riffing off of Dana’s recent op-ed for the Washington Post. Finally, they break down this week’s comfort watch—the 1936 screwball comedy, My Man Godfrey. In Slate Plus, the hosts are joined by Slate staff writer Lili Loofbourow to discuss her recent pieces on cancel culture and online debate. Slate Plus members get a bonus segment on theCultureGabfest each episode, and access to exclusiveshowslike Dana Stevens’ classic movies podcast Flashback.Sign up nowto listen and support our work. Other items discussed in this show: “Taylor Swift’s New Album Reveals That Social Distancing Has Served Her Well” by Carl Wilson in Slate “Held back: As parents realize how badly the U.S. botched the next school year, we’re furious” by Dana Stevens in the Washington Post “The Cancel Culture Trap” by Lili Loofbourow in Slate “Illiberalism Isn’t to Blame for the Death of Good-Faith Debate” by Lili Loofbourow in Slate Endorsements: Dana: Dana’s original drink “This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison,” inspired by a Samuel Taylor Coleridge poem. To make the cordial, boil a 2:1 ratio of lime juice to water on stove until reduced to half. Sweeten to taste. Mix with bourbon or rye whiskey. Throw in basil or mint leaf as garnish. Julia: Strand by the Spinanes, especially “Winter on Ice.” Steve: “Publish and Perish” by Agnes Callard in the Point. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. Production assistance by Rachael Allen. Outro Music: Back to Silence by OTE Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

63 MIN5 d ago
Comments
Culture Gabfest: Folklorn

Working: The Immersive Sounds of Audio Drama

EThis week, host June Thomas talks about her deep love of audio fiction with longtime radio and podcast writer-producer John Scott Dryden. First, they discuss the U.K. origins of the genre and the growing appetite for audio fiction in the U.S. Then they dig into John’s production process and discuss how he creates immersive stories using sounds and voices from all over the world. After the interview, June and co-host Rumaan Alam answer a question from a listener. Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com. Podcast production by Cameron Drews. And if you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on Working. It’s only $35 for the first year, and you can get a free two-week trial. Sign up nowto help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

46 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Working: The Immersive Sounds of Audio Drama

Hit Parade: What a Fool Believes Edition

ELike many media organizations at the moment, Slate is getting hit pretty hard by what's going on with the economy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. We want to continue doing our work, providing you with all our great podcasts, news and reporting, and we simply cannot do that without your support. So we're asking you to sign up for Slate Plus, our membership program. It's just $35 for the first year, and it goes a long way to supporting us in this crucial moment. In the late ’70s and early ’80s, a scene and a sound cropped up on the West Coast: polished, perfectionist studio musicians who generated sleek, jazzy, R&B-flavored music. About a quarter-century later, this sound was given a name: YachtRock. The inventors of the genre name weren’t thinking about boats…well, unless the song was Christopher Cross’s “Sailing.” Yacht Rock was meant to signify deluxe, yuppified, “smooth” music suitable for playing on luxury nautical craft. Whatever you call it, this music really did command the charts at the turn of the ’80s: from Steely Dan to George Benson, Michael McDonald to Kenny Loggins, Toto to…Michael Jackson?! Believe it: even Thriller is partially a Yacht Rock album. This month, Hit Parade breaks down what Yacht Rock was and how it took over the charts four decades ago—from the perfectionism of “Peg,” to the bounce of “What a Fool Believes,” to the epic smoothness of “Africa.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

8 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Hit Parade: What a Fool Believes Edition

Thirst Aid Kit: THIRSTMAIL VOL. 4

EIt’s never a bad move to hear from our thirsty yet oh-so-talented Thirst Buckets! Our audience is the best audience because they send us drabbles that make us swoon and giggle and we immediately put them aside so we can share the wealth on air. That’s what we’re doing with this episode— sharing listener-submitted drabbles about John Boyega, Aidan Turner, Pedro Pascal, Andy Samberg, and Seth Rogen. We also answer some questions from Tumblr and a couple of Thirst Sommelier requests. One listener needs someone with a Lin-Manuel Miranda vibe and someone else wants to replace Terry Crews on her thirst mood board. Luckily, we have a few suggestions we think will make everyone happy. In our Slate Plus segment, we break down quarantine beards: yay or nay? As usual, you can follow us on Twitter @ThirstAidKit. Our music is by Tanya Morgan. You can find show notes, and more on our Tumblr at thirstaidkitpodcast.tumblr.com. Don’t forget to send us your drabbles by emailing thirstaidkit@slate.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

59 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Thirst Aid Kit: THIRSTMAIL VOL. 4

Working: Adrian Tomine’s Drawings Tell Rich, Complex Stories

EThis week, host Rumaan Alam talks to cartoonist and New Yorker cover artist Adrian Tomine, who just released a graphic memoir called The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Cartoonist. In the interview, Adrian talks about what it was like for his childhood hobby to become a full-time job, and how his art has evolved over the years. After the interview, co-host June Thomas interviews Slate writers Dahlia Lithwick and Molly Olmstead about a massive piece of journalism they’ve put together about the women in Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s class at Harvard Law School. To hear the audio version of the piece, subscribe to Slate’s Amicus podcast. Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com. And if you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on Working. It’s only $35 for the first year, and you can get a free two-week trial. Sign up nowto help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

59 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Working: Adrian Tomine’s Drawings Tell Rich, Complex Stories

Spoiler Specials: Palm Springs

EOn the Spoiler Special podcast, Slate critics discuss movies, the occasional TV show, and, once in a blue moon, another podcast, in full spoiler-filled detail. This week, Slate’s movie critic Dana Stevens is joined by Willa Paskin, Slate’s television critic, and Sam Adams, a senior editor at Slate and the editor of Slate’s culture blog, Brow Beat, to spoil Palm Springs. At first, Palm Springs seems like a fun wedding rom-com until Nyles (Andy Samberg) is shot with a bow and arrow while fooling around in the desert with Sarah (Cristin Milioti). Injured, he crawls into a nearby cave and tells Sarah not to follow him. She ignores his warning and is pulled into his infinite time loop. Will she follow Nyles’ lead and make peace with the situation? Why is Nyles being hunted? Why is Sarah so desperate to find a way out? And what is with those dinosaurs? You can read Sam’s interview with the theoretical physicist who consulted on the movie here. Note: As the title indicates, this podca...

51 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Spoiler Specials: Palm Springs

Thirst Aid Kit: Bim’s Thirst 123s

EIt’s Bim’s turn to delve into the roots of her thirst habits — and naturally, it turned out to be a journey through TV and film! Watching Tevin Campbell sing to Ashley on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air and falling in love with Dwayne Wayne on A Different World led naturally to a love for Capeside’s finest, Pacey Witter… and also the Blue Moon Agency’s David Addison (Bruce Willis). We also trace Bim’s love for a Strong Nose to David Duchovny (Red Shoe Diaries) and ER’s Dr Luka Kovac (Goran Višnjić). Thirst is complex, y’all. In our Plus segment, we take a look at some of the cliche ‘sexy time’ tropes in film and TV and why they work (or not): the wanton clearing of a desk (hello, Friends and also The Good Wife); the full-bodied slam against the wall/bookcase (Atonement, Always Be My Maybe, The Night Manager) and why we do NOT fool around with food. Join Slate Plus to find out why! Slate.com/thirstaidplus As usual, you can follow us on Twitter @ThirstAidKit. Our music is by ...

68 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Thirst Aid Kit: Bim’s Thirst 123s
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