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Business Daily

BBC World Service

2.3K
Followers
10.4K
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Business Daily

Business Daily

BBC World Service

2.3K
Followers
10.4K
Plays
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About Us

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

Latest Episodes

A family rift in Syria

Why does the President of Syria seemingly want to destroy his cousin Rami Makhlouf? President Bashar al-Assad of Syria seems hell-bent on unseating his first cousin, and Syria's richest man, from his multi-billion dollar holdings. But Rami Makhlouf, is defying the President to his face. What's going on, what's at stake for Syria? Ed Butler speaks to the BBC's Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen. Plus he asks Ayman Abdel-Nour, a former economic advisor to the Syrian ruling party who knew Bashar al Assad at university, what he thinks is going on. (Picture: Syrian businessman Rami Makhlouf; Credit: Louai Beshara/Getty Images)

18 MIN10 h ago
Comments
A family rift in Syria

Rich and frugal?

Why do some of the super rich describe themselves as frugal? Is it something about the inner psyche that makes us natural savers or spenders? Elizabeth Hotson speaks to Dolly Parton, who despite earning millions, doesn’t particularly enjoy spending it. We also hear from Karam Hinduja, banker and scion of the billionaire Hinduja family. Tech entrepreneur, Richard Skellett tells us why he sees being wealthy as a responsibility, plus we hear from big savers, Tim Connor and Francesca Armstrong. We're also joined by Sarah Fallaw, author of The Next Millionaire Next Door, Rachel Sherman, author of Uneasy Street: The Anxieties of Affluence and Elin Helander, behavioural economist, neurologist and Chief Scientific Officer at Dreams, a money-saving app. (picture of a piggy bank via Getty Images).

18 MIN1 d ago
Comments
Rich and frugal?

Business Weekly

Lockdowns around the world has seen our energy usage plunge, but as restrictions ease will countries build back better? On Business Weekly we get the view of veteran scientist James Lovelock as he celebrates his 101st birthday. We ask him his predictions for planet earth. We also head to Ghana, where we take a look at efforts to reinvigorate the economy by attracting disillusioned African Americans to visit and start a new life there. Plus, if you’re missing watching you’re favourite bands, some artists are coming up with novel ways to get around bans on concerts.

36 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Business Weekly

Paid not to work: burden or opportunity?

In order to try and stem a wave of coronavirus-induced unemployment, governments around the world introduced job retention schemes. Many of these are being rolled back or withdrawn and Elizabeth Hotson asks whether the interventions got people out the habit of work or opened up new opportunities. We speak to three workers placed on furlough - gardening enthusiast, Carol Peett; single parent, Naomi Empowers and keen baker, Chinelo Awa. Plus New York law firm partner, Greg Rinckey tells us about some of the unexpected consequences of the CARES act in the US and Sarah Damaske, Associate Professor of Sociology at Penn State University, tells us that furlough wasn’t necessarily a chance to relax. (Picture of Naomi Empowers via Naomi Empowers).

17 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Paid not to work: burden or opportunity?

Trump's climate rollback

Environmental regulations are being systematically weakened and repealed by the US government. Justin Rowlatt speaks to someone trying to keep track of it all - Michael Gerrard of Columbia Law School. He also hears from Maria Caffrey, a climate scientist who lost her job at the US National Park Service after blowing the whistle about how her research was being suppressed - and she says she is not the only one. Climate sceptic Myron Ebell of the Competitive Enterprise Institute explains why the environmental rollback is good news for the US economy, while climate futurist Alex Steffen says humanity will be the living with the consequences of Trump's delay of climate action for generations to come. With Democratic challenger Joe Biden having unveiled an unprecedentedly ambitious climate plan, it means there is all to play for in the November Presidential elections. Producer: Laurence Knight (Picture: Donald Trump holds up a "Trump Digs Coal" sign at an event in Huntington, West Virgin...

18 MIN5 d ago
Comments
Trump's climate rollback

Evading sanctions

How easy is it to get around sanctions? The US has for some years used financial sanctions to target those it blames for corruption or supporting terrorism. But do these measures work? We hear the latest evidence that it may be quite easy to get round sanctions and asset freezes. (Picture: Suitcase full of cash; Credit: seyfettinozel/Getty Images)

18 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Evading sanctions

Will live streaming gigs save the music industry?

Musicians tell us how they are finding innovative ways to get around the pandemic and perform live to their fans. It's a very real problem - the BBC's arts editor Will Gompertz tells Ed Butler of the frustrations of performers like Beverley Knight (pictured) having to perform to half-empty auditoriums in order to ensure social distancing. Two singer-songwriters tell us the novel methods they've taken up during lockdown. Dent May describes his first live-stream performance from his own home, while Laura Marling put on a live staged performance for a limited ticketed online audience. The brainchild behind Laura's, music promoter Ric Salmon of Drift Live, says he thinks the concept will prove more than just a quick fix for Covid-19. (Picture: Beverley Knight performing to a live audience at the London Palladium; Credit: Andy Paradise/BBC)

18 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Will live streaming gigs save the music industry?

"Gaia Hypothesis" creator celebrates 101 years

Veteran environmentalist James Lovelock reflects on his career and the planet's future, as he turns 101 years old. The independent scientist, Wollaston medal recipient and inventor of the Gaia Hypothesis sits down with the BBC’s Chief Environment correspondent Justin Rowlatt to talk about his humble upbringing between the two World Wars, his inventions that helped propel the green movement, as well as his thoughts on the over-specialisation of the university system, and the future of human life on Earth. (Picture: James Lovelock. Picture Credit: BBC)

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
"Gaia Hypothesis" creator celebrates 101 years

Business Weekly

It’s estimated that a quarter of a billion people could lose their jobs as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. On Business Weekly we ask whether governments need to rethink the way they deal with mass unemployment. We also head to the salt flats of Bolivia to find out whether the untapped lithium reserves there will be a blessing or a curse for the South American country. Plus, we’ll discover why you’ll need to bring a coat if you go out for coffee in France and find out why doctors are putting pictures of themselves in bikinis on social media. Presented by Lucy Burton.

49 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Business Weekly

Homeworking: Is it messing with your head?

Working from home could outlast the pandemic. But workers' experiences with homeworking in lockdown are not all positive. Manuela Saragosa speaks to some office workers who've struggled to adapt to home life, and to Dr Zofia Bajorek, research fellow at the Institute for Employment Studies in the UK, who's been surveying workers on the pressures they've faced in lockdown. Cary Cooper, professor of organisational psychology and health at Manchester Business School, explains why face-to-face contact is so important for innovation in the workplace, and why flexible working with a mix of office and home will ultimately make us all happier. (Photo: A woman works from home, Credit: Getty Images)

18 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Homeworking: Is it messing with your head?

Latest Episodes

A family rift in Syria

Why does the President of Syria seemingly want to destroy his cousin Rami Makhlouf? President Bashar al-Assad of Syria seems hell-bent on unseating his first cousin, and Syria's richest man, from his multi-billion dollar holdings. But Rami Makhlouf, is defying the President to his face. What's going on, what's at stake for Syria? Ed Butler speaks to the BBC's Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen. Plus he asks Ayman Abdel-Nour, a former economic advisor to the Syrian ruling party who knew Bashar al Assad at university, what he thinks is going on. (Picture: Syrian businessman Rami Makhlouf; Credit: Louai Beshara/Getty Images)

18 MIN10 h ago
Comments
A family rift in Syria

Rich and frugal?

Why do some of the super rich describe themselves as frugal? Is it something about the inner psyche that makes us natural savers or spenders? Elizabeth Hotson speaks to Dolly Parton, who despite earning millions, doesn’t particularly enjoy spending it. We also hear from Karam Hinduja, banker and scion of the billionaire Hinduja family. Tech entrepreneur, Richard Skellett tells us why he sees being wealthy as a responsibility, plus we hear from big savers, Tim Connor and Francesca Armstrong. We're also joined by Sarah Fallaw, author of The Next Millionaire Next Door, Rachel Sherman, author of Uneasy Street: The Anxieties of Affluence and Elin Helander, behavioural economist, neurologist and Chief Scientific Officer at Dreams, a money-saving app. (picture of a piggy bank via Getty Images).

18 MIN1 d ago
Comments
Rich and frugal?

Business Weekly

Lockdowns around the world has seen our energy usage plunge, but as restrictions ease will countries build back better? On Business Weekly we get the view of veteran scientist James Lovelock as he celebrates his 101st birthday. We ask him his predictions for planet earth. We also head to Ghana, where we take a look at efforts to reinvigorate the economy by attracting disillusioned African Americans to visit and start a new life there. Plus, if you’re missing watching you’re favourite bands, some artists are coming up with novel ways to get around bans on concerts.

36 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Business Weekly

Paid not to work: burden or opportunity?

In order to try and stem a wave of coronavirus-induced unemployment, governments around the world introduced job retention schemes. Many of these are being rolled back or withdrawn and Elizabeth Hotson asks whether the interventions got people out the habit of work or opened up new opportunities. We speak to three workers placed on furlough - gardening enthusiast, Carol Peett; single parent, Naomi Empowers and keen baker, Chinelo Awa. Plus New York law firm partner, Greg Rinckey tells us about some of the unexpected consequences of the CARES act in the US and Sarah Damaske, Associate Professor of Sociology at Penn State University, tells us that furlough wasn’t necessarily a chance to relax. (Picture of Naomi Empowers via Naomi Empowers).

17 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Paid not to work: burden or opportunity?

Trump's climate rollback

Environmental regulations are being systematically weakened and repealed by the US government. Justin Rowlatt speaks to someone trying to keep track of it all - Michael Gerrard of Columbia Law School. He also hears from Maria Caffrey, a climate scientist who lost her job at the US National Park Service after blowing the whistle about how her research was being suppressed - and she says she is not the only one. Climate sceptic Myron Ebell of the Competitive Enterprise Institute explains why the environmental rollback is good news for the US economy, while climate futurist Alex Steffen says humanity will be the living with the consequences of Trump's delay of climate action for generations to come. With Democratic challenger Joe Biden having unveiled an unprecedentedly ambitious climate plan, it means there is all to play for in the November Presidential elections. Producer: Laurence Knight (Picture: Donald Trump holds up a "Trump Digs Coal" sign at an event in Huntington, West Virgin...

18 MIN5 d ago
Comments
Trump's climate rollback

Evading sanctions

How easy is it to get around sanctions? The US has for some years used financial sanctions to target those it blames for corruption or supporting terrorism. But do these measures work? We hear the latest evidence that it may be quite easy to get round sanctions and asset freezes. (Picture: Suitcase full of cash; Credit: seyfettinozel/Getty Images)

18 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Evading sanctions

Will live streaming gigs save the music industry?

Musicians tell us how they are finding innovative ways to get around the pandemic and perform live to their fans. It's a very real problem - the BBC's arts editor Will Gompertz tells Ed Butler of the frustrations of performers like Beverley Knight (pictured) having to perform to half-empty auditoriums in order to ensure social distancing. Two singer-songwriters tell us the novel methods they've taken up during lockdown. Dent May describes his first live-stream performance from his own home, while Laura Marling put on a live staged performance for a limited ticketed online audience. The brainchild behind Laura's, music promoter Ric Salmon of Drift Live, says he thinks the concept will prove more than just a quick fix for Covid-19. (Picture: Beverley Knight performing to a live audience at the London Palladium; Credit: Andy Paradise/BBC)

18 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Will live streaming gigs save the music industry?

"Gaia Hypothesis" creator celebrates 101 years

Veteran environmentalist James Lovelock reflects on his career and the planet's future, as he turns 101 years old. The independent scientist, Wollaston medal recipient and inventor of the Gaia Hypothesis sits down with the BBC’s Chief Environment correspondent Justin Rowlatt to talk about his humble upbringing between the two World Wars, his inventions that helped propel the green movement, as well as his thoughts on the over-specialisation of the university system, and the future of human life on Earth. (Picture: James Lovelock. Picture Credit: BBC)

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
"Gaia Hypothesis" creator celebrates 101 years

Business Weekly

It’s estimated that a quarter of a billion people could lose their jobs as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. On Business Weekly we ask whether governments need to rethink the way they deal with mass unemployment. We also head to the salt flats of Bolivia to find out whether the untapped lithium reserves there will be a blessing or a curse for the South American country. Plus, we’ll discover why you’ll need to bring a coat if you go out for coffee in France and find out why doctors are putting pictures of themselves in bikinis on social media. Presented by Lucy Burton.

49 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Business Weekly

Homeworking: Is it messing with your head?

Working from home could outlast the pandemic. But workers' experiences with homeworking in lockdown are not all positive. Manuela Saragosa speaks to some office workers who've struggled to adapt to home life, and to Dr Zofia Bajorek, research fellow at the Institute for Employment Studies in the UK, who's been surveying workers on the pressures they've faced in lockdown. Cary Cooper, professor of organisational psychology and health at Manchester Business School, explains why face-to-face contact is so important for innovation in the workplace, and why flexible working with a mix of office and home will ultimately make us all happier. (Photo: A woman works from home, Credit: Getty Images)

18 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Homeworking: Is it messing with your head?
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