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Anno Domini - In the Year of Our Lord

Anno Domini

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Anno Domini - In the Year of Our Lord

Anno Domini - In the Year of Our Lord

Anno Domini

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A podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.

Latest Episodes

Palm Sunday

Song: The Son of God goes Forth to WarPassage: Psalm 118:19-29Hello everyone and Welcome to episode #9 of the Anno Domini Podcast. A podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.Join me as we explore how Christ is revealed through the cyclical life of the church calendar year. We’ll discover how this calendar once structured culture and how it can again. We’ll also discuss practical ways to observe and celebrate these holy days in our quest to glorify God and live the good life in the midst of all good He has given us.Welcome back friends. My name is Joe Stout and my wife Elizabeth and I and our 8 children live in the wet and occasionally sunny Pacific Northwest. For those of you who may be new, this podcast, Anno Domini which literally means “In the Year of our Lord”, this podcast explores the year of the Lord as it has been traditionally marked on the Church Calendar. Our first episode started at the beginning of the Church New Year which this year fell on December 1st. Unlike our modern tradition of marking January 1st as the new beginning, the Church calendar marks the first Sunday of Advent, or the coming of Christ unto a dark world, as the perpetual new beginning. We begin by celebrating the coming of Christ in His various ways. Since the dates are different each year, this cycle was from December 1st through December 23rd. After Advent of course we celebrate Christmastide or Christmastime with Christmas Eve, and then all 12 days of Christmas. We then move into the period of Epiphany, the revealing of Christ unto a broken world which falls from January 6th through February 25th this season. Ash Wednesday, which this year fell on February 26th marks the beginning of the Season of Lent, the season in which we find ourselves now. As I remarked in the last episode, “the time of lent precedes the victory of Christ on the cross…Jesus was tempted for 40 days … was humbled to the point of death on a cross and during all of this faithfully obeyed His Father in Heaven. Because He was faithful in this, God raised Him up to glory and Christ calls us to follow the same path.”As we enter Holy Week, the culmination of Lent, let us remember the promise of God found James 4:10, “Humble yourselves in the sight of the Lord, and he shall lift you up.”PracticalAs I pointed out in the last episode, The period from Ash Wednesday to Easter Sunday is 40 days not including the Lord’s Day each week. This means that Palm Sunday is a unique holy day in that it falls within the Lenten Season but being that it is on a Sunday, any fasting would be abstained from since the Lord’s Day is meant to be celebrated with feasting and rest. Palm Sunday kicks off Holy Week which is the big finale of the Lenten season and concludes on Easter morning.Since part of the Anno Domini podcast centers around how we are to practically celebrate these holy days, I ought to give an account of the current events surrounding Palm Sunday 2020. As of the recording of this episode we are watching a local, national, and global historical event unfold. I’m of course speaking of the Chinese Virus that began in Wuhan China in December of 2019 and has spread around the globe. This virus is causing governments, gripped by fear, to self immolate entire economies, isolate people to their homes and hospital beds, and most egregious of all, forbid the gathering of people anywhere and everywhere for any reason at all. This means that for the last several weeks, showing up for the Lord’s Day service has been impossible for nearly everyone. Because technology often is a blessing when used rightly, many churches, ours included, have offered a live-stream of a Sunday morning sermon. This is nice and helps stave off feelings of isolation but a sermon is certainly not church. The gathering of a family to hear a sermon falls far short of our needed weekly gatherings. On Ash Wednesday, nearly a month before the madness began, I share

36 MIN1 d ago
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Palm Sunday

Ash Wednesday and Lent

Ash Wednesday and LentSong: O God of Earth and Altar (Prayer for the Nation)Passage: Joel2:12-19A Simple Church Year Catechism - Lent & EasterHello everyone and Welcome to episode #8 of the Anno Domini Podcast. A podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.Join me as we explore how Christ is revealed through the cyclical life of the church calendar year. We’ll discover how this calendar once structured culture and how it can again. We’ll also discuss practical ways to observe and celebrate these holy days in our quest to glorify God and live the good life in the midst of all good He has given us.Welcome back! My name for those just joining us is Joe Stout and the last few weeks have been extremely eventful in the Stout household. We welcomed with joy the birth of our 5th daughter, Ruthie Jane. Both Elizabeth and baby Ruthie are doing wonderfully well, God be praised. It’s been a little over 7 weeks since our last podcast. So In that episode I introduced the season of Epiphany in which we celebrate the manifestation or revealing of Christ to the world. He is revealed on Epiphany to the Magi, revealed to the world through His public baptism, revealed at the temple to Simeon, revealed to His inner circle on the mountain through His transfiguration and finally, His manifestation culminates as Christ goes into the desert and reveals Himself to Satan where he does battle for 40 days. With Christ entering the desert for 40 days of temptation we will transition from our celebration of His epiphany into the celebration of Lent. As the days lengthen and spring approaches we will daily be reminded that Easter is on the move and the days of the power of sin over God’s people has ended.----more----As a quick reminder we will look at for different segments, we generally start with the practical ways of celebrating a holiday or season of time, we then examine the biblical rationale for the holiday, then we look at how the holiday has been celebrated in history and finish with a hymn or psalm of music that we examine and listen to together. So let’s get startedPracticalStarting with the practical side, In the Stout house, we have never observed Lent or Ash Wednesday for that matter. This is due really to a combination of reasons the biggest one being that observing this time wasn’t a part of our families upbringing. We tend to emulate the way we were raised and that is a design feature not a bug. Kids turning out like their parents is how God made the world. It shouldn’t surprise us. Personally, this is an area of huge blessing for both Elizabeth and I as we had and still have righteous parents who raised us in the fear and admonition of the Lord. In fact in many cases we also had righteous grandparents going back several generations. We ought to go in the ways of our Father when our father’s go in the ways of the Lord. As GK Chesterton once observed, “these are the days when the Christian is expected to praise every creed except his own.” Christians shouldn’t fall into that temptation. We ought to feel a deep comfort in following the paths our father’s have laid for us provided those paths were honoring to God law. I say this because I have no paths to follow on this one; no prior experience to hearken back to. On the plus side, Ash Wednesday and the season of Lent have no sentimental or nostalgic value for me or my wife that could cloud God’s voice. On the negative side, it has none of the familiarities that for many Christians they have come to expect and naturally are held accountable too.With that in mind what should Christians do during Ash Wednesday and the season of Lent? Let’s take a look at the historical practice of the church and then answer that question.HistoricalAsh Wednesday and the season of Lent precedes Easter by 40 days. As we stated earlier, In the gospel, Jesus fasts and does battle with Satan for 40 days in the desert. 40 days is a common number in Scriptu

44 MINFEB 26
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Ash Wednesday and Lent

Twelfth Night & Epiphany

Song: Setting of Psalm 67Passage: Isaiah 60:1-9Dutch Children Act out the EpiphanyCopy and past this link:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=If622_Fd4JcHello everyone and Welcome to episode #7 of the Anno Domini Podcast. A podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.Join me as we explore how Christ is revealed through the cyclical life of the church calendar year. We’ll discover how this calendar once structured culture and how it can again. We’ll also discuss practical ways to observe and celebrate these holy days in our quest to glorify God and live the good life in the midst of all good He has given us.We have made it through the season of Advent and now we approach our next holiday on the Church calendar; Epiphany. Epiphany is the culmination of the Christmas season and comes after the 12 days of Christmas is over. It is a time when we celebrate the coming of the Messiah unto the Gentiles and up until the 19th century, it was on par with Christmas Day itself earning itself the title of “little Christmas.” As I’ve said before, Epiphany, like any of the feast and festivals found on the Church Calendar are not a requirement for Christians to observe but a blessings for those who enjoy the liberty found in the gospel. Christ came that we might have life and have it abundantly. If celebrating a holiday that is found only in tradition and not in the revealed Word of God bothers your conscience, then by all means sit this celebration out. Just remember this: Remember the Sabbath day and keep it holy. The Lord’s day is not a day that we have the option to take or leave. It is the day God has set aside for us to rest and worship Him. To celebrate the victory of the Christ over Sin, Satan, and Death itself.----more----Practical and HistoricalHave you ever heard of the 12 days of Christmas? You’ve know the song but contrary to popular belief now, the first day of Christmas is actually Christmas Day or December 25th and each following day until the evening of the January 5th or 12th day which is also called Twelfth Night those are the 12 days of Christmas. Westerners now generally start our Christmas preparations unfortunately on Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, and work at a frenzied pace to get everything ready for 1 day only. We then give all or most of our gifts on December 25th and many even have the tree and decoration taken down by the next day. It hasn’t always been like this though. Before the 19th century, when the industrial revolution put an end to extended celebrations, Epiphany was more important than Christmas Day itself. We would spread our gift giving and merry making out over 12 days, each day celebrating a different aspect of Christianity and our history. One day we would celebrate the first martyr of the Church, Stephan, another day we mark and mourn the slaughter of the innocents by the hand of the Romans and Herod in Bethlehem. This would all be building up to the very biggest part of the celebration which happens on the evening of January 5th or Twelfth night which was the eve of the Feast of the Epiphany. These were times meant for singing and caroling from door to door. A time of feasting and eating lots of great food with friends and family. It was also a time for making and eating something called Kings Cake which has many many variations with the version I’m most familiar with being called Panettone. Usually a dried bean would be placed on one side of the cake and a dried pea placed somewhere on the other side. The men and boys eat the side containing the bean and the women and girls eat the side containing the dried pea. Whoever finds the bean is King for that day and whoever finds the dried pea is Queen for the day. Historically, kids dress up on Epiphany as the three wise men and do nativity skits, sing songs, and go door to door caroling and receiving candy, coins, and many many smiles. I have a video I will link to in the show notes

25 MINJAN 5
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Twelfth Night & Epiphany

Christmas Day

ChristmasSong: The First NoelPassage: Isaiah 9:2-7For Unto Us a Child is Born: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_f7jhk-IjDoDownload the Album Advent:https://joestout.bandcamp.com/album/adventHello everyone and Merry Christmas! Welcome to episode #6 of the Anno Domini Podcast. This is a podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.Join me as we explore how Christ is revealed through the cyclical life of the church calendar year. We’ll discover how this calendar once structured culture and how it can again. We’ll also discuss practical ways to observe and celebrate these holy days in our quest to glorify God and live the good life in the midst of all good He has given us.Welcome back again friends. I hope you have all had a restful day full of feasting, family, and fantastic merry making. I began the show by wishing everyone a very merry Christmas. Those are words that have been fought over for several years now. It can be considered a political statement in the clown world we now live in merely to wish someone a Merry Christmas. But I believe that as our Lord told us, the sons of the world are more shrewd than those of us in the light. They understand the meaning of Christmas better than we do at times and when they come to this understanding they mutter along with Gollum “we hates it”. Christmas stands for the total invasion of the world of sin and darkness by the king of glory. This means that idols will fall, strongholds will be torn down, and the powers of this age will carry their power no longer. When we wish someone a Merry Christmas we are not just wishing them happiness. In our vernacular Merry means happy or cheerful and so it should however a man I admire greatly by the name of George Grant shared with me something quite insightful regarding that word Merry. Quote from him…”The word “merry” is from an old Anglo-Saxon word which literally means "valiant," “illustrious,” “great,” or “gallant.” Thus, to be merry is not merely to be mirthful, but to be mighty. In Shakespeare, we read of fiercely courageous soldiers who are called “merry men.” Strong winds are “merry gales.” Fine days are marked by “merry weather.” So, when we say "Merry Christmas," we are really exhorting one another to take heart and to stand fast!And so dear listener we note that to say Merry Christmas is nothing short than to wish the hearer to be consumed by the love of Christ and that all his or her idols, strongholds, and towers of trust will be torn down by the invasion of God into the world. The incarnation of God into flesh.Christmas is now here. Advent is over and Christmastime has begun. Today is the first day of Christmas, there are twelve and at the end of these twelve days Christ will be revealed to the world through Epiphany at least as the church calendar reckons it. Just as a reminder to my listeners that there are no holy days that Christians are bound to… save the weekly Lord’s Day itself. All of this is extra goodies on top of the weekly rest Christ has given us. These days of feasting, celebration, and reflection are here to strengthen our walk with God not bind up burdens upon our backs. As we explore the practical, biblical, historical and musical, remember that God created a world fill with good things because he is the best kind of extravagant. He could have given us a world in which everything was efficient, practical, and economical. A world with bland porridge three meals a day and room temperature weather. Instead we live in a world filled with beef brisket, oratorios by Handel, freshly cut fir, hurricanes and tornadoes and yes even Christmas lights. Celebrate with me over the coming days the extravagant goodness of God.PracticalNo transcript available.Biblical and HistoricalToday we are going to combine the Biblical with the Historic. The reason for this is that Christmas Eve and Christmas Day all fall under 1 heading, that of The Nativity of Our Lord. During thi

28 MIN2019 DEC 26
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Christmas Day

Christmas Eve - Midnight

Amid the Silence Christmas Carol:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDcHZ9i8KSkMerry Christmas Everyone!

14 MIN2019 DEC 25
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Christmas Eve - Midnight

Fourth Sunday of Advent

Song: From East to WestText: Isaiah 7: 10-17Liturgical Calendar DownloadHello everyone and welcome to episode #4 of the Anno Domini Podcast. A podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.Join me as we explore how Christ is revealed through the cyclical life of the church calendar year. We’ll discover how this calendar once structured culture and how it can again. We’ll also discuss practical ways to observe and celebrate these holy days in our quest to glorify God and live the good life in the midst of all good He has given us.We have now reached the beginning of the fourth week of the new church year. Last week was Gaudete Sunday or the Sunday of Rejoicing. This Lord’s Day is the 4th and final Sunday of Advent this year and by this time on Wednesday morning we will have completed the time of Advent and we will begin the joyful 12 days of Christmas also known as Christmastime or Christmastide. If this is your first time with us, my name is Joe Stout and I my wife and I and our 7 (soon to be 8) children decided to spend a year following the liturgical calendar. The following podcasts are produced in real time as a way of documenting the experiences discovered as a result of our attempt to structure our lives as so many of our Christian brothers and sisters have done in the past and are doing today. Our hope is that we will find that the liturgical calendar can give a framework for what we emphasize and when we emphasize it. We are in the season of Advent which is a time of longing and of joy. A time when we sing and pray and hope with all the saints, Maranatha or Come Lord Jesus. Our minds are bent in this way knowing He has already come and that He will one day come again. Like many of the promises of Scripture, Advent reminds us that God’s kingdom on earth has come in an “already but not yet” kind of way. Advent keeps us longing whether in joy, in pain, or in the groaning that all of creation experiences for the coming and fulfillment of the kingdom of God. The revealing of the sons and daughters of the King and the redemption of the body. This unraveling of the curse began when the Christ child, as the hymn tells us, the world’s redeemer, first revealed his sacred face. I think I will continue, at least for now, the structuring of this podcast into 4 parts, practical, biblical, historical, and musical. It interests me and so far I haven’t run out of things to say about each. My wife might think I won’t ever run out of things to say…about anything and she might be right. The point is, I care deeply about practical Christianity. I don’t want it just in my head as intellectual knowledge. I also don’t want it just in my heart as emotional feelings. I want to be able to live in a way that displays obedience, love, and devotion to the Savior who put on the frailty of human flesh so that I could one day put on the glory of the resurrected body. Examining devotion and obedience to Christ in the real world, a fancy word called orthopraxy, is so critical for Christians to embrace since our culture has long since forsaken anything resembling Christian conduct. This is why I start with the practical and follow it up with the biblical. Here is what we’ve done and this is why it matters. Then we move to the historical as a way of saying, we are not alone in this, others have followed these old paths too. Our feet may be new but the paths are not. We then end with an ancient or not so ancient hymn as a way of tying together and reinforcing in a worshipful manner the practical, biblical, and historic connections we have made.So let’s get started.PracticalI spoke briefly last week on the paradox surrounding rest. We often have to work very hard to prepare to rest the way God commanded. Rest is not the same as relaxation and should be seen as a spiritual act of service, obedience, and done in joy. With that in mind I found it interesting that my wife and I found ourselves talkin

31 MIN2019 DEC 22
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Fourth Sunday of Advent

Third Sunday of Advent - Gaudete

Song: Lift Up Your HeadsText: Isaiah 35Click HERE to listen to and download the new album "Advent"Hello and welcome to episode #3 of the Anno Domini Podcast. A podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.Join me as we explore how Christ is revealed through the cyclical life of the church calendar year. We’ll discover how this calendar once structured culture and how it can again. We’ll also discuss practical ways to observe and celebrate these holy days in our quest to glorify God and live the good life in the midst of all good He has given us.Welcome back to week 3 of our year-long journey of following the liturgical church calendar. My name is Joe Stout and I will be your host today. My wife and I and our 7 children decided to spend a year following the liturgical calendar. Since the church new year started on Dec. 1st 2019 with the First Sunday of Advent we are now at the Third Sunday of Advent which is sometime called GOW Day Tay Sunday which I will explain my understanding of later. This day should be marked with Joy and Rejoicing. We have much to rejoice over because the King of Kings is drawing near, the Savior of the World is here. So take joy dear Christians, Christ has overcome the darkness. Just a quick housekeeping note that Christians are called to keep one holy day only and that is the weekly Lord’s day. These days, weeks, and seasons of celebration are merely intended as a way of worshipping God with our entire being and provide communal focus to our lives as one body in Christ. We worship together, rejoice together, weep together…the Church calendar provides an opportunity for this and nothing more. This is the new covenant and if celebrating Christmas or Easter or Lent afflicts your conscience then by all means abstain. We all get to spend eternity together celebrating whichever way you choose.This podcast is divided into four parts. We start with practical ways to celebrate the holiday. We then move on to a biblical portion connected to the celebrated day chosen from the Lectionary, (see podcast #2 if you would like more information on the Lectionary). Our third section looks into historic ways in which the Church and our forefather’s have followed the calendar and the tools, traditions, and insight that has sprung from that. We finish the podcast with an in depth look at an ancient hymn that can be tied to the holiday.Let’s get started.PracticalOn the practical side of Advent celebrations I’ve got to say that celebrating holidays is a ton of work. When we look at the plethora of ways the Jews angered Yahweh in the old testament we often see a refusal to celebrate his commanded feast days at the forefront. In other words, God told His people to rest or party or somehow tried to bless them by giving them good works to do, they complained, corrupted the work, or simply ignored the feast day all together. While I certainly don’t want to condone their sin, I can also understand why not resting or celebrating is tempting. There is usually a lot of preparation that goes into the feast or celebration. This can make it hard to want to obey because what we think of as a blessing is usually self centered. We want peace and quiet, we want to veg out, we want to do our own thing and not be hindered by intentionally resting. We can sometimes conflate resting and relaxing. While they seem similar they can reveal themselves to be very different in their acts. Relaxing is like taking a long shower or sitting in a hot tub. It requires nothing from you and only offers benefits. Resting on the other hand usually requires discipline. The Jews understood this as they set aside the Friday before Saturday as the Day of Preparation. They were preparing for rest that paradoxically required work to achieve. This is not unlike our own journey of faith. We are accepted by God through the blood of Christ and we respond to this acceptance with faith. This faith results in go

32 MIN2019 DEC 15
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Third Sunday of Advent - Gaudete

Second Sunday of Advent

Second Sunday of AdventSong: Of the Father’s Love BegottenText: Isaiah 11: 1-10Lectionary Download.Hello and welcome to episode #2 of the Anno Domini Podcast. A podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.Join me as we explore how Christ is revealed through the cyclical life of the church calendar year. We’ll discover how this calendar once structured culture and how it can again. We’ll also discuss practical ways to observe and celebrate these holy days in our quest to glorify God and live the good life in the midst of all good He has given us.Welcome back to week 2 of our year-long journey of following the church calendar. My name is Joe Stout and I will be your host. I live in the Pacific Northwest with my lovely wife Elizabeth and our 7 soon to be 8 children. The second Sunday of Advent is here and with it there is continued eager anticipation at the coming of the Lord. This past week has been a joy for my family as we have taken each day to mark out in both small and large ways, the season of Advent. Advent is the beginning of the Church Calendar year and after Advent will come Christmastime and then Epiphany. I’d like to mention that I understand some Christians are uncomfortable with the idea of feasts days, fast days, festal and ferial days and the like. Paul certainly does not bind us to any of the days celebrated as a part of the church calendar. In fact it’s very important to note that ALL of these church calendar feasts that we discuss on the show are totally optional. We are living in the new covenant now and the only feast day that is required of us is the weekly Lord’s day Sabbath. This weekly period of celebration, feasting, and rest is the only true calendar we need and the only one we are bound by God to keep. But don’t worry, our God is so kind He blesses us with a festival every week. Truly His yoke is easy and His burden is light.PracticalThe podcast is divided into 4 sections. Practical, Biblical, Historical, and Musical. I’m thinking I’ll start with the practical because it will give a good opportunity at the beginning of the show to give a report on how things went since the last celebratory day. I’ll try and talk about the practical things my wife and children and I did to mark the season. So how did last week go? It was awesome. I love Advent because it gives Elizabeth and I the freedom to make everything a celebration. Generally we try and give actual presents on each Sunday of Advent. These are usually not huge gifts and this last week was no exception. Our kids have been totally into drinking tea. Even the 3 year old wants to have tea. He doesn’t want to actually drink the tea be he does NOT want to be left out. So this past week Elizabeth went to the goodwill and found 6 Christmas themed coffee mugs. She then filled them with bags of tea and instant coffee, the coffee was for oldest son Charles who prefers coffee to tea. We then wrapped the goody filled mugs up and gave them to the kids during our Advent liturgy that way they could actually have tea while we celebrated.During the week we focus the kids attention on experiences together as times of celebrations. On monday there was a free orchestra concert that my mother-in-law took the kids too. Advent celebration. On Tuesday we went out and had pizza with everyone. Advent celebration. On Wednesday, our dear friends from Spokane sent us some incredible radio dramas so we passed them onto our children during the day. Advent Celebration. Just today, Elizabeth came home from a doctors appt. and brought each of the kids a 33¢ ruler from the dollar store. This doesn’t have to be complicated. Managing expectation in your kids is and teaching them to be excited and thankful for a 33¢ ruler is one of the keys to a happy home.BiblicalLet’s move from the practical application of celebrating Advent into the biblical passage. This weeks biblical text as it relates to the Second Sunday of Advent

36 MIN2019 DEC 6
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Second Sunday of Advent

First Sunday of Advent

First Sunday of Advent- Song: Savior of the Nations Come- Text: Isaiah 2: 1-5- Download the Advent & Christmas DevotionalHello and welcome to the first episode of the Anno Domini Podcast. A podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.In this podcast we explore together how Christ can be revealed to us through the cyclical life of the church calendar year. How this calendar once structured culture and how it can again. We’ll also explore practical ways to observe and celebrate these holy days in our quest to glorify God and live the good life in all He has given us.Now since this is episode one I’d like to lay some ground work for what to expect. I’d like to explore over the next year how God fearing, Christ following, Spirit filled, Christians can benefit from following the Church Calendar year. Personally, I come from a protestant, reformed, evangelical background and have very little experience with the Church Calendar outside of Christmas and Easter. This is a journey on which I embark with little more than a passion to learn and report back what I’ve found.Now for a quick disclaimer that will likely be standard to every episode. The only “holy day” or holiday that I believe Christians are held to keeping is the weekly sabbath. No, I’m not referring to the old testament jewish sabbath but the new covenant Sunday sabbath, the day of the Lord, or Lord’s day. From the creation of the world, we’ve been resting once per week. It’s the fourth commandment and the only holiday or day set apart that I believe Christians are covenantally required to keep and what a blessing this Sabbath is to us. All the other days we will examine and celebrate are simply experiential ways of worshiping God with our whole being. We close our eyes, bow our heads, and kneel to pray not because there is a bible verse requiring us to do so but because we worship with our heart, soul, body, and mind. Following the liturgical calendar is a similar experience. While not commanded, it can be simply another way we can submit to the glory and the supremacy of Christ in all things by celebration. And as Christians living in the year of our Lord 2019, we have every reason to celebrate.With the disclaimer out of the way let’s get started.We will generally follow four segments per show. The first will be an introduction to the holiday with some biblical references in support of the celebratory focus. Secondly, we will look at the historic ways this holiday has been celebrated and how it shaped culture. Thirdly we will examine a few practical suggestions for how you and your family might celebrate the day. The last segment will likely be the longest as we will be examining an ancient or not so ancient hymn that is based on or connected to the theme of the holiday.I’ll try and get these episodes out two or three days in advance of the holiday so that you can have time to prepare for the day if you want to.Let’s get started.This week’s episode is all about Advent. On December 1st, Anno Domini 2019 the Church militant will celebrate the 1st Sunday of Advent.A couple of definitions to help. Anno Domini is the latin phrase for “in the year of our Lord.” We often simply use the abbreviation AD. This is the year 2019 AD. The entire calendar system of the world is based off the resurrection of Christ. This is one of the many ways in which Christ is saving the whole world and bringing all nations and principalities under his rule.The church militant according to Noah Webster is “the christian church on earth, which is supposed to be engaged in a constant warfare against its enemies; thus distinguished from the church triumphant, or in heaven.” Therefore the church militant refers to any and all trinitarian followers of God who trust the Father, obey the Son, and are filled with the Holy Spirit.Advent is the four sabbaths leading up to Christmas and marks the beginning of the Christian new year. We might be tem

24 MIN2019 NOV 30
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First Sunday of Advent
the END

Latest Episodes

Palm Sunday

Song: The Son of God goes Forth to WarPassage: Psalm 118:19-29Hello everyone and Welcome to episode #9 of the Anno Domini Podcast. A podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.Join me as we explore how Christ is revealed through the cyclical life of the church calendar year. We’ll discover how this calendar once structured culture and how it can again. We’ll also discuss practical ways to observe and celebrate these holy days in our quest to glorify God and live the good life in the midst of all good He has given us.Welcome back friends. My name is Joe Stout and my wife Elizabeth and I and our 8 children live in the wet and occasionally sunny Pacific Northwest. For those of you who may be new, this podcast, Anno Domini which literally means “In the Year of our Lord”, this podcast explores the year of the Lord as it has been traditionally marked on the Church Calendar. Our first episode started at the beginning of the Church New Year which this year fell on December 1st. Unlike our modern tradition of marking January 1st as the new beginning, the Church calendar marks the first Sunday of Advent, or the coming of Christ unto a dark world, as the perpetual new beginning. We begin by celebrating the coming of Christ in His various ways. Since the dates are different each year, this cycle was from December 1st through December 23rd. After Advent of course we celebrate Christmastide or Christmastime with Christmas Eve, and then all 12 days of Christmas. We then move into the period of Epiphany, the revealing of Christ unto a broken world which falls from January 6th through February 25th this season. Ash Wednesday, which this year fell on February 26th marks the beginning of the Season of Lent, the season in which we find ourselves now. As I remarked in the last episode, “the time of lent precedes the victory of Christ on the cross…Jesus was tempted for 40 days … was humbled to the point of death on a cross and during all of this faithfully obeyed His Father in Heaven. Because He was faithful in this, God raised Him up to glory and Christ calls us to follow the same path.”As we enter Holy Week, the culmination of Lent, let us remember the promise of God found James 4:10, “Humble yourselves in the sight of the Lord, and he shall lift you up.”PracticalAs I pointed out in the last episode, The period from Ash Wednesday to Easter Sunday is 40 days not including the Lord’s Day each week. This means that Palm Sunday is a unique holy day in that it falls within the Lenten Season but being that it is on a Sunday, any fasting would be abstained from since the Lord’s Day is meant to be celebrated with feasting and rest. Palm Sunday kicks off Holy Week which is the big finale of the Lenten season and concludes on Easter morning.Since part of the Anno Domini podcast centers around how we are to practically celebrate these holy days, I ought to give an account of the current events surrounding Palm Sunday 2020. As of the recording of this episode we are watching a local, national, and global historical event unfold. I’m of course speaking of the Chinese Virus that began in Wuhan China in December of 2019 and has spread around the globe. This virus is causing governments, gripped by fear, to self immolate entire economies, isolate people to their homes and hospital beds, and most egregious of all, forbid the gathering of people anywhere and everywhere for any reason at all. This means that for the last several weeks, showing up for the Lord’s Day service has been impossible for nearly everyone. Because technology often is a blessing when used rightly, many churches, ours included, have offered a live-stream of a Sunday morning sermon. This is nice and helps stave off feelings of isolation but a sermon is certainly not church. The gathering of a family to hear a sermon falls far short of our needed weekly gatherings. On Ash Wednesday, nearly a month before the madness began, I share

36 MIN1 d ago
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Palm Sunday

Ash Wednesday and Lent

Ash Wednesday and LentSong: O God of Earth and Altar (Prayer for the Nation)Passage: Joel2:12-19A Simple Church Year Catechism - Lent & EasterHello everyone and Welcome to episode #8 of the Anno Domini Podcast. A podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.Join me as we explore how Christ is revealed through the cyclical life of the church calendar year. We’ll discover how this calendar once structured culture and how it can again. We’ll also discuss practical ways to observe and celebrate these holy days in our quest to glorify God and live the good life in the midst of all good He has given us.Welcome back! My name for those just joining us is Joe Stout and the last few weeks have been extremely eventful in the Stout household. We welcomed with joy the birth of our 5th daughter, Ruthie Jane. Both Elizabeth and baby Ruthie are doing wonderfully well, God be praised. It’s been a little over 7 weeks since our last podcast. So In that episode I introduced the season of Epiphany in which we celebrate the manifestation or revealing of Christ to the world. He is revealed on Epiphany to the Magi, revealed to the world through His public baptism, revealed at the temple to Simeon, revealed to His inner circle on the mountain through His transfiguration and finally, His manifestation culminates as Christ goes into the desert and reveals Himself to Satan where he does battle for 40 days. With Christ entering the desert for 40 days of temptation we will transition from our celebration of His epiphany into the celebration of Lent. As the days lengthen and spring approaches we will daily be reminded that Easter is on the move and the days of the power of sin over God’s people has ended.----more----As a quick reminder we will look at for different segments, we generally start with the practical ways of celebrating a holiday or season of time, we then examine the biblical rationale for the holiday, then we look at how the holiday has been celebrated in history and finish with a hymn or psalm of music that we examine and listen to together. So let’s get startedPracticalStarting with the practical side, In the Stout house, we have never observed Lent or Ash Wednesday for that matter. This is due really to a combination of reasons the biggest one being that observing this time wasn’t a part of our families upbringing. We tend to emulate the way we were raised and that is a design feature not a bug. Kids turning out like their parents is how God made the world. It shouldn’t surprise us. Personally, this is an area of huge blessing for both Elizabeth and I as we had and still have righteous parents who raised us in the fear and admonition of the Lord. In fact in many cases we also had righteous grandparents going back several generations. We ought to go in the ways of our Father when our father’s go in the ways of the Lord. As GK Chesterton once observed, “these are the days when the Christian is expected to praise every creed except his own.” Christians shouldn’t fall into that temptation. We ought to feel a deep comfort in following the paths our father’s have laid for us provided those paths were honoring to God law. I say this because I have no paths to follow on this one; no prior experience to hearken back to. On the plus side, Ash Wednesday and the season of Lent have no sentimental or nostalgic value for me or my wife that could cloud God’s voice. On the negative side, it has none of the familiarities that for many Christians they have come to expect and naturally are held accountable too.With that in mind what should Christians do during Ash Wednesday and the season of Lent? Let’s take a look at the historical practice of the church and then answer that question.HistoricalAsh Wednesday and the season of Lent precedes Easter by 40 days. As we stated earlier, In the gospel, Jesus fasts and does battle with Satan for 40 days in the desert. 40 days is a common number in Scriptu

44 MINFEB 26
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Ash Wednesday and Lent

Twelfth Night & Epiphany

Song: Setting of Psalm 67Passage: Isaiah 60:1-9Dutch Children Act out the EpiphanyCopy and past this link:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=If622_Fd4JcHello everyone and Welcome to episode #7 of the Anno Domini Podcast. A podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.Join me as we explore how Christ is revealed through the cyclical life of the church calendar year. We’ll discover how this calendar once structured culture and how it can again. We’ll also discuss practical ways to observe and celebrate these holy days in our quest to glorify God and live the good life in the midst of all good He has given us.We have made it through the season of Advent and now we approach our next holiday on the Church calendar; Epiphany. Epiphany is the culmination of the Christmas season and comes after the 12 days of Christmas is over. It is a time when we celebrate the coming of the Messiah unto the Gentiles and up until the 19th century, it was on par with Christmas Day itself earning itself the title of “little Christmas.” As I’ve said before, Epiphany, like any of the feast and festivals found on the Church Calendar are not a requirement for Christians to observe but a blessings for those who enjoy the liberty found in the gospel. Christ came that we might have life and have it abundantly. If celebrating a holiday that is found only in tradition and not in the revealed Word of God bothers your conscience, then by all means sit this celebration out. Just remember this: Remember the Sabbath day and keep it holy. The Lord’s day is not a day that we have the option to take or leave. It is the day God has set aside for us to rest and worship Him. To celebrate the victory of the Christ over Sin, Satan, and Death itself.----more----Practical and HistoricalHave you ever heard of the 12 days of Christmas? You’ve know the song but contrary to popular belief now, the first day of Christmas is actually Christmas Day or December 25th and each following day until the evening of the January 5th or 12th day which is also called Twelfth Night those are the 12 days of Christmas. Westerners now generally start our Christmas preparations unfortunately on Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, and work at a frenzied pace to get everything ready for 1 day only. We then give all or most of our gifts on December 25th and many even have the tree and decoration taken down by the next day. It hasn’t always been like this though. Before the 19th century, when the industrial revolution put an end to extended celebrations, Epiphany was more important than Christmas Day itself. We would spread our gift giving and merry making out over 12 days, each day celebrating a different aspect of Christianity and our history. One day we would celebrate the first martyr of the Church, Stephan, another day we mark and mourn the slaughter of the innocents by the hand of the Romans and Herod in Bethlehem. This would all be building up to the very biggest part of the celebration which happens on the evening of January 5th or Twelfth night which was the eve of the Feast of the Epiphany. These were times meant for singing and caroling from door to door. A time of feasting and eating lots of great food with friends and family. It was also a time for making and eating something called Kings Cake which has many many variations with the version I’m most familiar with being called Panettone. Usually a dried bean would be placed on one side of the cake and a dried pea placed somewhere on the other side. The men and boys eat the side containing the bean and the women and girls eat the side containing the dried pea. Whoever finds the bean is King for that day and whoever finds the dried pea is Queen for the day. Historically, kids dress up on Epiphany as the three wise men and do nativity skits, sing songs, and go door to door caroling and receiving candy, coins, and many many smiles. I have a video I will link to in the show notes

25 MINJAN 5
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Twelfth Night & Epiphany

Christmas Day

ChristmasSong: The First NoelPassage: Isaiah 9:2-7For Unto Us a Child is Born: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_f7jhk-IjDoDownload the Album Advent:https://joestout.bandcamp.com/album/adventHello everyone and Merry Christmas! Welcome to episode #6 of the Anno Domini Podcast. This is a podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.Join me as we explore how Christ is revealed through the cyclical life of the church calendar year. We’ll discover how this calendar once structured culture and how it can again. We’ll also discuss practical ways to observe and celebrate these holy days in our quest to glorify God and live the good life in the midst of all good He has given us.Welcome back again friends. I hope you have all had a restful day full of feasting, family, and fantastic merry making. I began the show by wishing everyone a very merry Christmas. Those are words that have been fought over for several years now. It can be considered a political statement in the clown world we now live in merely to wish someone a Merry Christmas. But I believe that as our Lord told us, the sons of the world are more shrewd than those of us in the light. They understand the meaning of Christmas better than we do at times and when they come to this understanding they mutter along with Gollum “we hates it”. Christmas stands for the total invasion of the world of sin and darkness by the king of glory. This means that idols will fall, strongholds will be torn down, and the powers of this age will carry their power no longer. When we wish someone a Merry Christmas we are not just wishing them happiness. In our vernacular Merry means happy or cheerful and so it should however a man I admire greatly by the name of George Grant shared with me something quite insightful regarding that word Merry. Quote from him…”The word “merry” is from an old Anglo-Saxon word which literally means "valiant," “illustrious,” “great,” or “gallant.” Thus, to be merry is not merely to be mirthful, but to be mighty. In Shakespeare, we read of fiercely courageous soldiers who are called “merry men.” Strong winds are “merry gales.” Fine days are marked by “merry weather.” So, when we say "Merry Christmas," we are really exhorting one another to take heart and to stand fast!And so dear listener we note that to say Merry Christmas is nothing short than to wish the hearer to be consumed by the love of Christ and that all his or her idols, strongholds, and towers of trust will be torn down by the invasion of God into the world. The incarnation of God into flesh.Christmas is now here. Advent is over and Christmastime has begun. Today is the first day of Christmas, there are twelve and at the end of these twelve days Christ will be revealed to the world through Epiphany at least as the church calendar reckons it. Just as a reminder to my listeners that there are no holy days that Christians are bound to… save the weekly Lord’s Day itself. All of this is extra goodies on top of the weekly rest Christ has given us. These days of feasting, celebration, and reflection are here to strengthen our walk with God not bind up burdens upon our backs. As we explore the practical, biblical, historical and musical, remember that God created a world fill with good things because he is the best kind of extravagant. He could have given us a world in which everything was efficient, practical, and economical. A world with bland porridge three meals a day and room temperature weather. Instead we live in a world filled with beef brisket, oratorios by Handel, freshly cut fir, hurricanes and tornadoes and yes even Christmas lights. Celebrate with me over the coming days the extravagant goodness of God.PracticalNo transcript available.Biblical and HistoricalToday we are going to combine the Biblical with the Historic. The reason for this is that Christmas Eve and Christmas Day all fall under 1 heading, that of The Nativity of Our Lord. During thi

28 MIN2019 DEC 26
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Christmas Day

Christmas Eve - Midnight

Amid the Silence Christmas Carol:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDcHZ9i8KSkMerry Christmas Everyone!

14 MIN2019 DEC 25
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Christmas Eve - Midnight

Fourth Sunday of Advent

Song: From East to WestText: Isaiah 7: 10-17Liturgical Calendar DownloadHello everyone and welcome to episode #4 of the Anno Domini Podcast. A podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.Join me as we explore how Christ is revealed through the cyclical life of the church calendar year. We’ll discover how this calendar once structured culture and how it can again. We’ll also discuss practical ways to observe and celebrate these holy days in our quest to glorify God and live the good life in the midst of all good He has given us.We have now reached the beginning of the fourth week of the new church year. Last week was Gaudete Sunday or the Sunday of Rejoicing. This Lord’s Day is the 4th and final Sunday of Advent this year and by this time on Wednesday morning we will have completed the time of Advent and we will begin the joyful 12 days of Christmas also known as Christmastime or Christmastide. If this is your first time with us, my name is Joe Stout and I my wife and I and our 7 (soon to be 8) children decided to spend a year following the liturgical calendar. The following podcasts are produced in real time as a way of documenting the experiences discovered as a result of our attempt to structure our lives as so many of our Christian brothers and sisters have done in the past and are doing today. Our hope is that we will find that the liturgical calendar can give a framework for what we emphasize and when we emphasize it. We are in the season of Advent which is a time of longing and of joy. A time when we sing and pray and hope with all the saints, Maranatha or Come Lord Jesus. Our minds are bent in this way knowing He has already come and that He will one day come again. Like many of the promises of Scripture, Advent reminds us that God’s kingdom on earth has come in an “already but not yet” kind of way. Advent keeps us longing whether in joy, in pain, or in the groaning that all of creation experiences for the coming and fulfillment of the kingdom of God. The revealing of the sons and daughters of the King and the redemption of the body. This unraveling of the curse began when the Christ child, as the hymn tells us, the world’s redeemer, first revealed his sacred face. I think I will continue, at least for now, the structuring of this podcast into 4 parts, practical, biblical, historical, and musical. It interests me and so far I haven’t run out of things to say about each. My wife might think I won’t ever run out of things to say…about anything and she might be right. The point is, I care deeply about practical Christianity. I don’t want it just in my head as intellectual knowledge. I also don’t want it just in my heart as emotional feelings. I want to be able to live in a way that displays obedience, love, and devotion to the Savior who put on the frailty of human flesh so that I could one day put on the glory of the resurrected body. Examining devotion and obedience to Christ in the real world, a fancy word called orthopraxy, is so critical for Christians to embrace since our culture has long since forsaken anything resembling Christian conduct. This is why I start with the practical and follow it up with the biblical. Here is what we’ve done and this is why it matters. Then we move to the historical as a way of saying, we are not alone in this, others have followed these old paths too. Our feet may be new but the paths are not. We then end with an ancient or not so ancient hymn as a way of tying together and reinforcing in a worshipful manner the practical, biblical, and historic connections we have made.So let’s get started.PracticalI spoke briefly last week on the paradox surrounding rest. We often have to work very hard to prepare to rest the way God commanded. Rest is not the same as relaxation and should be seen as a spiritual act of service, obedience, and done in joy. With that in mind I found it interesting that my wife and I found ourselves talkin

31 MIN2019 DEC 22
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Fourth Sunday of Advent

Third Sunday of Advent - Gaudete

Song: Lift Up Your HeadsText: Isaiah 35Click HERE to listen to and download the new album "Advent"Hello and welcome to episode #3 of the Anno Domini Podcast. A podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.Join me as we explore how Christ is revealed through the cyclical life of the church calendar year. We’ll discover how this calendar once structured culture and how it can again. We’ll also discuss practical ways to observe and celebrate these holy days in our quest to glorify God and live the good life in the midst of all good He has given us.Welcome back to week 3 of our year-long journey of following the liturgical church calendar. My name is Joe Stout and I will be your host today. My wife and I and our 7 children decided to spend a year following the liturgical calendar. Since the church new year started on Dec. 1st 2019 with the First Sunday of Advent we are now at the Third Sunday of Advent which is sometime called GOW Day Tay Sunday which I will explain my understanding of later. This day should be marked with Joy and Rejoicing. We have much to rejoice over because the King of Kings is drawing near, the Savior of the World is here. So take joy dear Christians, Christ has overcome the darkness. Just a quick housekeeping note that Christians are called to keep one holy day only and that is the weekly Lord’s day. These days, weeks, and seasons of celebration are merely intended as a way of worshipping God with our entire being and provide communal focus to our lives as one body in Christ. We worship together, rejoice together, weep together…the Church calendar provides an opportunity for this and nothing more. This is the new covenant and if celebrating Christmas or Easter or Lent afflicts your conscience then by all means abstain. We all get to spend eternity together celebrating whichever way you choose.This podcast is divided into four parts. We start with practical ways to celebrate the holiday. We then move on to a biblical portion connected to the celebrated day chosen from the Lectionary, (see podcast #2 if you would like more information on the Lectionary). Our third section looks into historic ways in which the Church and our forefather’s have followed the calendar and the tools, traditions, and insight that has sprung from that. We finish the podcast with an in depth look at an ancient hymn that can be tied to the holiday.Let’s get started.PracticalOn the practical side of Advent celebrations I’ve got to say that celebrating holidays is a ton of work. When we look at the plethora of ways the Jews angered Yahweh in the old testament we often see a refusal to celebrate his commanded feast days at the forefront. In other words, God told His people to rest or party or somehow tried to bless them by giving them good works to do, they complained, corrupted the work, or simply ignored the feast day all together. While I certainly don’t want to condone their sin, I can also understand why not resting or celebrating is tempting. There is usually a lot of preparation that goes into the feast or celebration. This can make it hard to want to obey because what we think of as a blessing is usually self centered. We want peace and quiet, we want to veg out, we want to do our own thing and not be hindered by intentionally resting. We can sometimes conflate resting and relaxing. While they seem similar they can reveal themselves to be very different in their acts. Relaxing is like taking a long shower or sitting in a hot tub. It requires nothing from you and only offers benefits. Resting on the other hand usually requires discipline. The Jews understood this as they set aside the Friday before Saturday as the Day of Preparation. They were preparing for rest that paradoxically required work to achieve. This is not unlike our own journey of faith. We are accepted by God through the blood of Christ and we respond to this acceptance with faith. This faith results in go

32 MIN2019 DEC 15
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Third Sunday of Advent - Gaudete

Second Sunday of Advent

Second Sunday of AdventSong: Of the Father’s Love BegottenText: Isaiah 11: 1-10Lectionary Download.Hello and welcome to episode #2 of the Anno Domini Podcast. A podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.Join me as we explore how Christ is revealed through the cyclical life of the church calendar year. We’ll discover how this calendar once structured culture and how it can again. We’ll also discuss practical ways to observe and celebrate these holy days in our quest to glorify God and live the good life in the midst of all good He has given us.Welcome back to week 2 of our year-long journey of following the church calendar. My name is Joe Stout and I will be your host. I live in the Pacific Northwest with my lovely wife Elizabeth and our 7 soon to be 8 children. The second Sunday of Advent is here and with it there is continued eager anticipation at the coming of the Lord. This past week has been a joy for my family as we have taken each day to mark out in both small and large ways, the season of Advent. Advent is the beginning of the Church Calendar year and after Advent will come Christmastime and then Epiphany. I’d like to mention that I understand some Christians are uncomfortable with the idea of feasts days, fast days, festal and ferial days and the like. Paul certainly does not bind us to any of the days celebrated as a part of the church calendar. In fact it’s very important to note that ALL of these church calendar feasts that we discuss on the show are totally optional. We are living in the new covenant now and the only feast day that is required of us is the weekly Lord’s day Sabbath. This weekly period of celebration, feasting, and rest is the only true calendar we need and the only one we are bound by God to keep. But don’t worry, our God is so kind He blesses us with a festival every week. Truly His yoke is easy and His burden is light.PracticalThe podcast is divided into 4 sections. Practical, Biblical, Historical, and Musical. I’m thinking I’ll start with the practical because it will give a good opportunity at the beginning of the show to give a report on how things went since the last celebratory day. I’ll try and talk about the practical things my wife and children and I did to mark the season. So how did last week go? It was awesome. I love Advent because it gives Elizabeth and I the freedom to make everything a celebration. Generally we try and give actual presents on each Sunday of Advent. These are usually not huge gifts and this last week was no exception. Our kids have been totally into drinking tea. Even the 3 year old wants to have tea. He doesn’t want to actually drink the tea be he does NOT want to be left out. So this past week Elizabeth went to the goodwill and found 6 Christmas themed coffee mugs. She then filled them with bags of tea and instant coffee, the coffee was for oldest son Charles who prefers coffee to tea. We then wrapped the goody filled mugs up and gave them to the kids during our Advent liturgy that way they could actually have tea while we celebrated.During the week we focus the kids attention on experiences together as times of celebrations. On monday there was a free orchestra concert that my mother-in-law took the kids too. Advent celebration. On Tuesday we went out and had pizza with everyone. Advent celebration. On Wednesday, our dear friends from Spokane sent us some incredible radio dramas so we passed them onto our children during the day. Advent Celebration. Just today, Elizabeth came home from a doctors appt. and brought each of the kids a 33¢ ruler from the dollar store. This doesn’t have to be complicated. Managing expectation in your kids is and teaching them to be excited and thankful for a 33¢ ruler is one of the keys to a happy home.BiblicalLet’s move from the practical application of celebrating Advent into the biblical passage. This weeks biblical text as it relates to the Second Sunday of Advent

36 MIN2019 DEC 6
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Second Sunday of Advent

First Sunday of Advent

First Sunday of Advent- Song: Savior of the Nations Come- Text: Isaiah 2: 1-5- Download the Advent & Christmas DevotionalHello and welcome to the first episode of the Anno Domini Podcast. A podcast dedicated to the supremacy of Christ over all things including our days, weeks, and months.In this podcast we explore together how Christ can be revealed to us through the cyclical life of the church calendar year. How this calendar once structured culture and how it can again. We’ll also explore practical ways to observe and celebrate these holy days in our quest to glorify God and live the good life in all He has given us.Now since this is episode one I’d like to lay some ground work for what to expect. I’d like to explore over the next year how God fearing, Christ following, Spirit filled, Christians can benefit from following the Church Calendar year. Personally, I come from a protestant, reformed, evangelical background and have very little experience with the Church Calendar outside of Christmas and Easter. This is a journey on which I embark with little more than a passion to learn and report back what I’ve found.Now for a quick disclaimer that will likely be standard to every episode. The only “holy day” or holiday that I believe Christians are held to keeping is the weekly sabbath. No, I’m not referring to the old testament jewish sabbath but the new covenant Sunday sabbath, the day of the Lord, or Lord’s day. From the creation of the world, we’ve been resting once per week. It’s the fourth commandment and the only holiday or day set apart that I believe Christians are covenantally required to keep and what a blessing this Sabbath is to us. All the other days we will examine and celebrate are simply experiential ways of worshiping God with our whole being. We close our eyes, bow our heads, and kneel to pray not because there is a bible verse requiring us to do so but because we worship with our heart, soul, body, and mind. Following the liturgical calendar is a similar experience. While not commanded, it can be simply another way we can submit to the glory and the supremacy of Christ in all things by celebration. And as Christians living in the year of our Lord 2019, we have every reason to celebrate.With the disclaimer out of the way let’s get started.We will generally follow four segments per show. The first will be an introduction to the holiday with some biblical references in support of the celebratory focus. Secondly, we will look at the historic ways this holiday has been celebrated and how it shaped culture. Thirdly we will examine a few practical suggestions for how you and your family might celebrate the day. The last segment will likely be the longest as we will be examining an ancient or not so ancient hymn that is based on or connected to the theme of the holiday.I’ll try and get these episodes out two or three days in advance of the holiday so that you can have time to prepare for the day if you want to.Let’s get started.This week’s episode is all about Advent. On December 1st, Anno Domini 2019 the Church militant will celebrate the 1st Sunday of Advent.A couple of definitions to help. Anno Domini is the latin phrase for “in the year of our Lord.” We often simply use the abbreviation AD. This is the year 2019 AD. The entire calendar system of the world is based off the resurrection of Christ. This is one of the many ways in which Christ is saving the whole world and bringing all nations and principalities under his rule.The church militant according to Noah Webster is “the christian church on earth, which is supposed to be engaged in a constant warfare against its enemies; thus distinguished from the church triumphant, or in heaven.” Therefore the church militant refers to any and all trinitarian followers of God who trust the Father, obey the Son, and are filled with the Holy Spirit.Advent is the four sabbaths leading up to Christmas and marks the beginning of the Christian new year. We might be tem

24 MIN2019 NOV 30
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First Sunday of Advent
the END
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