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The Signal

ABC Radio

84
Followers
1.6K
Plays
The Signal

The Signal

ABC Radio

84
Followers
1.6K
Plays
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About Us

The Signal is the ABC's daily news podcast that helps cut through the noise to cover the biggest stories, explaining not only what is happening but why. It's an entertaining 15-minute show, perfect for the daily commute.

Latest Episodes

Why Hong Kongers take the risk

China's new National Security Law that Hong Kongers were dreading didn't keep them from protesting this week. Thousands turned out, and hundreds were arrested. The risks they're taking are greater than ever: not only is there an ongoing pandemic, but protesters face life in prison if they're arrested and convicted of any of a suite of new offences that were created on Tuesday. So why do they keep showing up, even when they feel no hope? Today on The Signal, we speak to three women from the pro-democracy movement, to try to understand what drives them to keep taking the risk. Featured: 'Jas', Hong Kong pro-democracy protester 'P', Hong Kong pro-democracy protester 'Hannah', Hong Kong pro-democracy protester

20 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Why Hong Kongers take the risk

Surviving a poor, dangerous, disorderly world

Australia is stocking up on weapons to protect itself against an increasingly "poor" and "disorderly" world. To that end, Scott Morrison wants to spend $270 billion on defence over the next decade. The shopping list includes long-range missiles, satellites and under-sea sensors, and the clear subtext is that we might need those things to protect ourselves from China. So how much danger are we actually in? And will the new defence budget keep us safe? Today on The Signal, we're glimpsing the Government's vision of the hostile new world that's likely to surround us in years to come, as well as its blueprint for a more aggressive Australia to meet it. Featured: Ashley Townshend, Director, Foreign Policy and Defence, US Studies Centre, University of Sydney

16 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Surviving a poor, dangerous, disorderly world

Victoria's backslide into lockdown

Millions of Victorians are adjusting to news of their second COVID-19 lockdown. Ten postcodes covering 35 suburbs will effectively wind back the clock by months in the fight against the virus, as the state struggles to contain a spike in cases. So how did Victoria find itself in this position? And are the new measures enough to get the situation back under control? Featured: Tony Blakely, Professorial Fellow in Epidemiology, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne

14 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Victoria's backslide into lockdown

How the West looks from China

Australia's relationship with China at the moment is toxic and dangerous, and Chinese state media isn't helping. Yesterday, under the headline "Australia wages espionage offensive against China", the Chinese Communist Party tabloid Global Times accused Australia of trying to bug the Chinese embassy in Canberra, citing one anonymous source. It also suggested that Australian spies had been caught "red-handed" with a compass, a USB drive, and a paper map of Shanghai, and said Australia had been planting fake stories about China in western media. It all seems pretty strange, and some of the basic details are wrong. So why do stories like this find a receptive audience within China? Today on The Signal, there's a version of 20th century history you've probably never heard, but that every Chinese citizen learns in school. It's feeding into pretty much every dispute China has with the West in 2020, whether it's to do with Hong Kong, espionage or COVID-19. So how do Australia and the West l...

17 MIN5 d ago
Comments
How the West looks from China

America's war on its health officials

America just had one of its worst ever weekends in the fight against COVID-19. In a terrible new milestone, the country is now recording more than 40,000 new cases each day, and states including Florida and Texas are reversing plans to reopen their economies. But as the virus spreads, health officials working to protect the community are being targeted. Some have been stalked, others abused or threatened with violence, and dozens have gone into hiding or quit their jobs altogether. Today on The Signal, we ask why so many Americans are taking their fury out on the medical professionals trying to help them. Featured: Dr Marcus Plescia, Chief Medical Officer, US Association of State and Territorial Health Officials

16 MIN6 d ago
Comments
America's war on its health officials

What COVID-19 is doing to Brazil

The poorest Brazilians are coming up with grassroots answers to COVID-19, even as the spread of the virus accelerates. There are thousands of news cases and hundreds of deaths on a daily basis in Brazil, and the crisis is not yet thought to be at its peak. At the same time, the Brazilian Government, led by the populist conservative firebrand President Jair Bolsonaro, is in crisis. So where does that leave Brazilians in the meantime, and will the nation emerge with its democracy intact?

16 MIN1 w ago
Comments
What COVID-19 is doing to Brazil

Australia's incredible shrinking media

It's a bleak time in the Australian media industry. On top of the looming loss of 250 staff at the ABC, already this year nearly 100 newspapers have gone out of print circulation, and the all important ad revenue is drying up for TV stations, commercial radio, and capital city newspapers too. So is it terminal? Today on The Signal we assess the long-term damage being done to Australian journalism, and ask how things became this bad, and whether there's anything that could turn it around. Featured: Jonathan Holmes, Former presenter, Media Watch, ABC TV

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Australia's incredible shrinking media

Is sexual harassment preventable?

Sexual harassment allegations against the former High Court Justice Dyson Heydon have revived the conversation about victimisation in the workplace. Dyson Heydon denies any wrongdoing. But the allegations aren't the first to be heard in Australia, and they won't be the last. So is there a way to prevent sexual harassment from happening, rather than just responding when it does? Featured: Dr Kcasey McLoughlin, Senior Lecturer, Newcastle Law School, University of Newcastle

14 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Is sexual harassment preventable?

Is it possible to ‘unrelax’?

Relaxing COVID-19 restrictions is the easy part, but reversing them might be harder. The daily number of new COVID-19 cases in Victoria has been climbing for a couple of weeks. It's not a second wave yet, but it could still turn into one. Today on The Signal, we ask what it'll take to stop that from happening. And now that Australians have begun to relax,is it possible to undo that? Featured: Tony Blakely, Professor of Epidemiology, University of Melbourne Alex Haslam, Professor of Psychology, University of Queensland

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Is it possible to ‘unrelax’?

Doing the maths on an arts degree

University could be about to get a lot more expensive, depending on what you want to study. From next year, under a government proposal, it would cost 113% more to go to uni for an Arts degree, and 28% more to study law or commerce, while the cost of studying agriculture, maths, nursing, teaching and languages would fall significantly. So what's the rationale behind the change? And if it goes through, will it change enrolment trends? Today on The Signal we ask why the Government has decided that certain subjects are more worthy of funding than others, and what it might mean for you. Featured: Conor Duffy, ABC Education and Parenting Reporter David Speers, Host, Insiders, ABC TV

15 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Doing the maths on an arts degree

Latest Episodes

Why Hong Kongers take the risk

China's new National Security Law that Hong Kongers were dreading didn't keep them from protesting this week. Thousands turned out, and hundreds were arrested. The risks they're taking are greater than ever: not only is there an ongoing pandemic, but protesters face life in prison if they're arrested and convicted of any of a suite of new offences that were created on Tuesday. So why do they keep showing up, even when they feel no hope? Today on The Signal, we speak to three women from the pro-democracy movement, to try to understand what drives them to keep taking the risk. Featured: 'Jas', Hong Kong pro-democracy protester 'P', Hong Kong pro-democracy protester 'Hannah', Hong Kong pro-democracy protester

20 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Why Hong Kongers take the risk

Surviving a poor, dangerous, disorderly world

Australia is stocking up on weapons to protect itself against an increasingly "poor" and "disorderly" world. To that end, Scott Morrison wants to spend $270 billion on defence over the next decade. The shopping list includes long-range missiles, satellites and under-sea sensors, and the clear subtext is that we might need those things to protect ourselves from China. So how much danger are we actually in? And will the new defence budget keep us safe? Today on The Signal, we're glimpsing the Government's vision of the hostile new world that's likely to surround us in years to come, as well as its blueprint for a more aggressive Australia to meet it. Featured: Ashley Townshend, Director, Foreign Policy and Defence, US Studies Centre, University of Sydney

16 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Surviving a poor, dangerous, disorderly world

Victoria's backslide into lockdown

Millions of Victorians are adjusting to news of their second COVID-19 lockdown. Ten postcodes covering 35 suburbs will effectively wind back the clock by months in the fight against the virus, as the state struggles to contain a spike in cases. So how did Victoria find itself in this position? And are the new measures enough to get the situation back under control? Featured: Tony Blakely, Professorial Fellow in Epidemiology, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne

14 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Victoria's backslide into lockdown

How the West looks from China

Australia's relationship with China at the moment is toxic and dangerous, and Chinese state media isn't helping. Yesterday, under the headline "Australia wages espionage offensive against China", the Chinese Communist Party tabloid Global Times accused Australia of trying to bug the Chinese embassy in Canberra, citing one anonymous source. It also suggested that Australian spies had been caught "red-handed" with a compass, a USB drive, and a paper map of Shanghai, and said Australia had been planting fake stories about China in western media. It all seems pretty strange, and some of the basic details are wrong. So why do stories like this find a receptive audience within China? Today on The Signal, there's a version of 20th century history you've probably never heard, but that every Chinese citizen learns in school. It's feeding into pretty much every dispute China has with the West in 2020, whether it's to do with Hong Kong, espionage or COVID-19. So how do Australia and the West l...

17 MIN5 d ago
Comments
How the West looks from China

America's war on its health officials

America just had one of its worst ever weekends in the fight against COVID-19. In a terrible new milestone, the country is now recording more than 40,000 new cases each day, and states including Florida and Texas are reversing plans to reopen their economies. But as the virus spreads, health officials working to protect the community are being targeted. Some have been stalked, others abused or threatened with violence, and dozens have gone into hiding or quit their jobs altogether. Today on The Signal, we ask why so many Americans are taking their fury out on the medical professionals trying to help them. Featured: Dr Marcus Plescia, Chief Medical Officer, US Association of State and Territorial Health Officials

16 MIN6 d ago
Comments
America's war on its health officials

What COVID-19 is doing to Brazil

The poorest Brazilians are coming up with grassroots answers to COVID-19, even as the spread of the virus accelerates. There are thousands of news cases and hundreds of deaths on a daily basis in Brazil, and the crisis is not yet thought to be at its peak. At the same time, the Brazilian Government, led by the populist conservative firebrand President Jair Bolsonaro, is in crisis. So where does that leave Brazilians in the meantime, and will the nation emerge with its democracy intact?

16 MIN1 w ago
Comments
What COVID-19 is doing to Brazil

Australia's incredible shrinking media

It's a bleak time in the Australian media industry. On top of the looming loss of 250 staff at the ABC, already this year nearly 100 newspapers have gone out of print circulation, and the all important ad revenue is drying up for TV stations, commercial radio, and capital city newspapers too. So is it terminal? Today on The Signal we assess the long-term damage being done to Australian journalism, and ask how things became this bad, and whether there's anything that could turn it around. Featured: Jonathan Holmes, Former presenter, Media Watch, ABC TV

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Australia's incredible shrinking media

Is sexual harassment preventable?

Sexual harassment allegations against the former High Court Justice Dyson Heydon have revived the conversation about victimisation in the workplace. Dyson Heydon denies any wrongdoing. But the allegations aren't the first to be heard in Australia, and they won't be the last. So is there a way to prevent sexual harassment from happening, rather than just responding when it does? Featured: Dr Kcasey McLoughlin, Senior Lecturer, Newcastle Law School, University of Newcastle

14 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Is sexual harassment preventable?

Is it possible to ‘unrelax’?

Relaxing COVID-19 restrictions is the easy part, but reversing them might be harder. The daily number of new COVID-19 cases in Victoria has been climbing for a couple of weeks. It's not a second wave yet, but it could still turn into one. Today on The Signal, we ask what it'll take to stop that from happening. And now that Australians have begun to relax,is it possible to undo that? Featured: Tony Blakely, Professor of Epidemiology, University of Melbourne Alex Haslam, Professor of Psychology, University of Queensland

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Is it possible to ‘unrelax’?

Doing the maths on an arts degree

University could be about to get a lot more expensive, depending on what you want to study. From next year, under a government proposal, it would cost 113% more to go to uni for an Arts degree, and 28% more to study law or commerce, while the cost of studying agriculture, maths, nursing, teaching and languages would fall significantly. So what's the rationale behind the change? And if it goes through, will it change enrolment trends? Today on The Signal we ask why the Government has decided that certain subjects are more worthy of funding than others, and what it might mean for you. Featured: Conor Duffy, ABC Education and Parenting Reporter David Speers, Host, Insiders, ABC TV

15 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Doing the maths on an arts degree

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