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The View from Somewhere

Critical Frequency

27
Followers
122
Plays
The View from Somewhere

The View from Somewhere

Critical Frequency

27
Followers
122
Plays
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About Us

Trust in journalists is at an all-time low, but the work of journalism matters more than ever. And traditional “objectivity” may be hurting, rather than helping. All journalists have a view from somewhere, and ”objective” journalism often upholds status quo thinking and reinforces racism, sexism, and transphobia. Host Lewis Raven Wallace was fired from the public radio show Marketplace in 2017 for saying just that. In the years since, Lewis has dug into the history of “objectivity,” who it serves, and who it excludes. The View from Somewhere tells the stories of journalists who have resisted “objectivity” and stood up for justice, and envisions new approaches to truth and integrity in journalism.

Latest Episodes

The End of Extractive Journalism

EExtractive journalism—reporting on communities without input or accountability—is the model for a lot of journalism in the U.S., especially journalism about low-income people and communities of color. But lots of people are and have been actively resisting this model. We hear from Sarah Alvarez of Outlier Media in Detroit and Bettina Chang of City Bureau in Chicago about building journalism organizations based on power-sharing rather than extraction, how information can save lives in pandemic times, and how the COVID-19 crisis has changed their work.

39 minJUN 10
Comments
The End of Extractive Journalism

Wash Your Hands, Know Your History

EJournalist and professor Steven Thrasher draws out the connections between coverage of HIV/AIDS and coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. Thrasher joined us for Episode 8 about queer media history and AIDS. Also: How handwashing is a symbol for trust and the ability to be changed by new information.

27 minAPR 16
Comments
Wash Your Hands, Know Your History

Standing in the Rising Water

Host Lewis Raven Wallace talks about the need to seize a sense of possibility and imagination during the coronavirus pandemic, reads from The View from Somewhere book about reporting on the end of the world (standing in the rising water), and previews special programming coming soon.

14 minMAR 28
Comments
Standing in the Rising Water

The Colonization of Doubt: Right Wing Media, Fake News, and Bunk

EIs it racist? Are they lying? Some journalists are afraid to weigh in on facts even when they have good evidence. Why? Turns out there’s a whole history behind accusations of “liberal media bias” and the twisting of truth by Right Wing pundits. With expert commentary from historian Nicole Hemmer, journalism critic Jay Rosen, and poet and author Kevin Young, this episode explores the history of right wing media, “liberal media bias,” and how we can become truth swimmers, seeking multiple truths without giving up on truth altogether. It features the story of filmmaker Marlon Riggs and a brief dive into the origins of “Birtherism,” the conspiratorial accusation that President Barack Obama was born outside the United States. James Baldwin once wrote, “expose the question the answer hides.” He’s our guide for this episode.

37 minMAR 11
Comments
The Colonization of Doubt: Right Wing Media, Fake News, and Bunk

Public Media and the Limits of Diversity

EFormer public radio reporter Brenda Salinas and former public television producer Cecilia Garcia reflect on how far public media hasn’t come on “diversity” in the last forty years—and why. Also: how producers of color can protect their magic. Lewis and Ramona share their experiences in public media, and suggest a different framework for thinking about “diversity.” Salinas, an NPR Kroc Fellow and a producer at KUT Austin, describes how she was pushed out of public media by racism and sexism; Garcia, creator of the bilingual Latino newsmagazine Para mi Pueblo, sat on a task force in 1977 calling for the kind of diversity public media still struggles with.

37 minFEB 25
Comments
Public Media and the Limits of Diversity

Straight News? AIDS and Queer Media History

EQueer media has always been based in a personal experience, and being close to the story role served a particular purpose in a time of crisis. Sarah Schulman, Steven Thrasher, and John Scagliotti reflect on the history of queer media, from Scagliotti’s scrappy start in the 1970s, to Schulman’s groundbreaking reporting in the 1980s, to the work of the LGBTQ press to expose the truth about the AIDS crisis.

34 minJAN 30
Comments
Straight News? AIDS and Queer Media History

The Second Annual View from Somewhere Kick-a-thon, Featuring “Dreamgirl” Ramona Martinez on Piano

Producer Ramona Martinez takes over as host for a “live” pledge drive in support of The View from Somewhere’s Kickstarter campaign—we’re close to our goal! She plays piano and takes a call from her cat Cyclops, who’s somehow figured out how to use a phone. Plus: The Twin Peaks theme song, and real live shedding of tears. This episode was inspired by the “Dan Roddlestein’s Holiday Hoopla” episode from the Dreamboy podcast.

12 minJAN 24
Comments
The Second Annual View from Somewhere Kick-a-thon, Featuring “Dreamgirl” Ramona Martinez on Piano

Special Episode: Resisting “Fake News” By Exercising Truth Muscles

EWhile on tour this past fall, host Lewis Raven Wallace heard a lot of questions—about how to change people’s minds, how to challenge “fake news” and disinformation, and how to change journalism collectively. In response, he reads from the conclusion of The View from Somewhere book, “The End of Journalism,” and fills us in on the crowdfunding campaign that’s now underway!

13 minJAN 18
Comments
Special Episode: Resisting “Fake News” By Exercising Truth Muscles

The Life and Death of Ruben Salazar

EHe was one of the first Latinos to write for an anglo newspaper, covering the increasingly-active Chicano movement in Los Angeles. Professional distance from the story was important to him, but after cops killed him at a protest, he was transformed from an observer to a movement hero. Ramona Martinez shares a piece she produced for BackStory about this overlooked Latino legend.

16 minJAN 8
Comments
The Life and Death of Ruben Salazar

Truth and Vietnam

EThe heyday of “objective” journalism was short-lived—Civil Rights, the women’s movement, and the war in Vietnam all chipped away at it. Lewis Raven Wallace meets two rabble-rousing women reporters who engaged with Vietnam in very different ways, Laura Palmer and Kerry Gruson. Both walked away with the conclusion that serving the truth is full of gray areas.

34 min2019 DEC 17
Comments
Truth and Vietnam

Latest Episodes

The End of Extractive Journalism

EExtractive journalism—reporting on communities without input or accountability—is the model for a lot of journalism in the U.S., especially journalism about low-income people and communities of color. But lots of people are and have been actively resisting this model. We hear from Sarah Alvarez of Outlier Media in Detroit and Bettina Chang of City Bureau in Chicago about building journalism organizations based on power-sharing rather than extraction, how information can save lives in pandemic times, and how the COVID-19 crisis has changed their work.

39 minJUN 10
Comments
The End of Extractive Journalism

Wash Your Hands, Know Your History

EJournalist and professor Steven Thrasher draws out the connections between coverage of HIV/AIDS and coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. Thrasher joined us for Episode 8 about queer media history and AIDS. Also: How handwashing is a symbol for trust and the ability to be changed by new information.

27 minAPR 16
Comments
Wash Your Hands, Know Your History

Standing in the Rising Water

Host Lewis Raven Wallace talks about the need to seize a sense of possibility and imagination during the coronavirus pandemic, reads from The View from Somewhere book about reporting on the end of the world (standing in the rising water), and previews special programming coming soon.

14 minMAR 28
Comments
Standing in the Rising Water

The Colonization of Doubt: Right Wing Media, Fake News, and Bunk

EIs it racist? Are they lying? Some journalists are afraid to weigh in on facts even when they have good evidence. Why? Turns out there’s a whole history behind accusations of “liberal media bias” and the twisting of truth by Right Wing pundits. With expert commentary from historian Nicole Hemmer, journalism critic Jay Rosen, and poet and author Kevin Young, this episode explores the history of right wing media, “liberal media bias,” and how we can become truth swimmers, seeking multiple truths without giving up on truth altogether. It features the story of filmmaker Marlon Riggs and a brief dive into the origins of “Birtherism,” the conspiratorial accusation that President Barack Obama was born outside the United States. James Baldwin once wrote, “expose the question the answer hides.” He’s our guide for this episode.

37 minMAR 11
Comments
The Colonization of Doubt: Right Wing Media, Fake News, and Bunk

Public Media and the Limits of Diversity

EFormer public radio reporter Brenda Salinas and former public television producer Cecilia Garcia reflect on how far public media hasn’t come on “diversity” in the last forty years—and why. Also: how producers of color can protect their magic. Lewis and Ramona share their experiences in public media, and suggest a different framework for thinking about “diversity.” Salinas, an NPR Kroc Fellow and a producer at KUT Austin, describes how she was pushed out of public media by racism and sexism; Garcia, creator of the bilingual Latino newsmagazine Para mi Pueblo, sat on a task force in 1977 calling for the kind of diversity public media still struggles with.

37 minFEB 25
Comments
Public Media and the Limits of Diversity

Straight News? AIDS and Queer Media History

EQueer media has always been based in a personal experience, and being close to the story role served a particular purpose in a time of crisis. Sarah Schulman, Steven Thrasher, and John Scagliotti reflect on the history of queer media, from Scagliotti’s scrappy start in the 1970s, to Schulman’s groundbreaking reporting in the 1980s, to the work of the LGBTQ press to expose the truth about the AIDS crisis.

34 minJAN 30
Comments
Straight News? AIDS and Queer Media History

The Second Annual View from Somewhere Kick-a-thon, Featuring “Dreamgirl” Ramona Martinez on Piano

Producer Ramona Martinez takes over as host for a “live” pledge drive in support of The View from Somewhere’s Kickstarter campaign—we’re close to our goal! She plays piano and takes a call from her cat Cyclops, who’s somehow figured out how to use a phone. Plus: The Twin Peaks theme song, and real live shedding of tears. This episode was inspired by the “Dan Roddlestein’s Holiday Hoopla” episode from the Dreamboy podcast.

12 minJAN 24
Comments
The Second Annual View from Somewhere Kick-a-thon, Featuring “Dreamgirl” Ramona Martinez on Piano

Special Episode: Resisting “Fake News” By Exercising Truth Muscles

EWhile on tour this past fall, host Lewis Raven Wallace heard a lot of questions—about how to change people’s minds, how to challenge “fake news” and disinformation, and how to change journalism collectively. In response, he reads from the conclusion of The View from Somewhere book, “The End of Journalism,” and fills us in on the crowdfunding campaign that’s now underway!

13 minJAN 18
Comments
Special Episode: Resisting “Fake News” By Exercising Truth Muscles

The Life and Death of Ruben Salazar

EHe was one of the first Latinos to write for an anglo newspaper, covering the increasingly-active Chicano movement in Los Angeles. Professional distance from the story was important to him, but after cops killed him at a protest, he was transformed from an observer to a movement hero. Ramona Martinez shares a piece she produced for BackStory about this overlooked Latino legend.

16 minJAN 8
Comments
The Life and Death of Ruben Salazar

Truth and Vietnam

EThe heyday of “objective” journalism was short-lived—Civil Rights, the women’s movement, and the war in Vietnam all chipped away at it. Lewis Raven Wallace meets two rabble-rousing women reporters who engaged with Vietnam in very different ways, Laura Palmer and Kerry Gruson. Both walked away with the conclusion that serving the truth is full of gray areas.

34 min2019 DEC 17
Comments
Truth and Vietnam
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