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The Next 100 Days Podcast

Kevin Appleby & Graham Arrowsmith

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The Next 100 Days Podcast

The Next 100 Days Podcast

Kevin Appleby & Graham Arrowsmith

1
Followers
2
Plays
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Transform Your Business in The Next 100 Days

Latest Episodes

#235 Joana Lopez – Divorce and Breakup Recovery

Divorce and Breakup Recovery with Joana Lopez On today's podcast, we have Joana Lopez talk to us about divorce and breakup recovery. She is a heartbreak coach from Toronto. Lovely to have her! Joana grew up in Mexico, but moved to Canada when she was very young. It's been home ever since. What does a divorce and breakup coach mean? Basically, Joana works with people through the emotional pain caused by separation. When people go through that separation, the emotional pain can be and is overwhelming and need help processing that. It can really block your mind from focussing on things and so Joana helps entrepreneurs know how to tackle these things to help their business. So, Joana's ideal client is entrepreneurs working through breakups. The moment people are able to get back on their feet, they are able to heal. When in the process of breakups and divorces do people come to you for help? There are 3 levels of the separation process/3 types of client Joana works with: * The client who is still in the relationship and unhappy, and doesn't know how to move forward. It's affecting their business. * It is not the process of separation that's bothering this client - they want the separation. Or, they are undergoing the process of separation because their partner has willed it. * This client has already been dealing with separation for a long period of time and it is affecting their mental health and other aspects of their lives. With all of that, divorce and breakup recovery can be so intense and long-lasting. Joana helps clients work through it in an efficient way so that they can move on. How do you advise that person? http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/How-do-you-advise-people.mp4 Joana helps clients by recognising psychological reactions in the individuals. She has a lot of material to help her clients, because every single client will be different.... But then again, will they have similar characteristics? Joana loves this question! Personally, she finds each story different in each tragedy. However, there are 3 main issues or core problems that Joana and her business solves. A lot of the breakup problems go beyond the break up. This is because we have unconscious patterns and blocks. Therefore, Joana has 3 stages in which she helps the client with heartbreak. * Assess the unconscious blocks and patterns - this is because the problem that clients come with is never theactual problem. * Remove those unconscious patterns and blocks. * Install new, healthy patterns that will help the client form new relationships, either with the person they are separating from, someone new or help them move on entirely. Through this process, Joana helps the client go from tragedy and triumph. Joana's story Joana has always been interested in relationship breakups and what happens in the brain during that event and process. Before that, she was a business and life coach, so personal development has always been her 'thing'. 5 years ago, Joana had a traumatic separation. Going through that pain, she was wondering why she couldn't get past the breakup because she had all the knowledge of personal and neurological development. Why couldn't she get over this person? So, she went through a search of what happens during separation (for a relationship or a marriage). It became a fascinating journey. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Breakups-and-the-brain.mp4

50 MIN1 w ago
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#235 Joana Lopez – Divorce and Breakup Recovery

#234 Reginald Larry-Cole – Compassionate Capitalism

Compassionate Capitalism with Reggie Larry-Cole Today, we have a man talking to us about capitalism. But not just any capitalism - compassionate capitalism. There's a real story behind the book. We hope Reginald's story will inspire you! What's your day job? http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Whats-your-day-job.mp4 What's genius is simple ideas. And it's hard to come up with a simple, effective idea. So well done Reggie, and also well done for the 9 year anniversary of the business! Reggie runs a peer to peer investor operation. Investor's effectively pay for cars for essential/key workers. The story behind this idea and getting funding is one of endurance, perseverance and disappointing starts. Reggie's story to compassionate capitalism Reggie has been working since he was 16 and bought his first home when he was 18. He comes from a wealthy family in terms of achievement. His foundation was strong. Moving to America, Reggie married his teenage lover. However, unfortunately it didn't work out, so he came back to the UK. And, he started to build a business based on fairness. April 15th 2008 came with a credit crunch though. He lost everything - his kids, his business, his home, his family. So, he ended up at a job where he worked for free. Worked for free! He knew the importance of his job when his co-director, Martin, said he didn't work for free. Despite this, Reggie worked diligently to deliver what his managers expected delivering.From there, he and Scott started building a business which is now delivering return. At its heart Buy2LetCarscomes out of a frustration at banks who made it hard for key workers to get a car. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Credit-crunches-covid-and-cars.mp4 How I turned 150 no's into one yes and built a multi-million empire... The end situation of this situation is that Reggie is sat in his office, calling Chris - the one yes! Reggie thanked him, talked to his wife, talked to the dog (naturally), etc. He has a strong relationship with this guy. In April 2008, the company Reggie called was a motor company, because he had the idea of buy-to-let. The manager said it wouldn't work, but he took the letter to his manager. Despite the turmoil of the market, Reggie got what he asked for, because his idea was brilliant. As a result that's how he got started. 150 no's Let's be honest, that's a lot of hearing no! These were all kinds of people saying no and charlatans trying to steal Reggie's idea too! http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lots-of-nos.mp4 If you want to start a restaurant, buy the food and sell the food is capitalism. Society has got to the stage where we say give the money and I won't do anything. That's abuse. We do a lot of things for nothing. Hopefully the turmoil we are experiencing now brings certain things to light and changes how capitalism is working. This business is a win-win business. Why? Well those leasing the cars love it because they don't break down - they're new! And for those investing, 4% is the lowest amount of dissatisfaction that inv...

59 MIN2 w ago
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#234 Reginald Larry-Cole – Compassionate Capitalism

#233 John Moran & Rob Comer – Alternative Investing

Alternative Investing with John Moran and Rob Comer We've never had 2 guests on the podcast at the same time! So it's a first today. We have Rob Comer and John Moran with us, talking about alternative investing. Alternative investing is a sector Rob and John have been in for some time. They help people find great ways to gain money in alternative ways and are going to help us understand them more. What are your backgrounds and how did you come into alternative investing? Alternative ways to generate income are on a lot of people's minds right now. When Rob started looking into it some years ago now, he went down the traditional route of building a portfolio in properties.Rob's background was property investing and he was trying to stop trading time for money. In contrast, John left full-time employment 5-6 years ago. He was introduced to an investor and the world of investments. Well, after that he took the plunge! http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/John-first-meets-Rob.mp4 Well, John's nickname is honest John! In fact, Graham remembers John's antics on Blind Date when he won! http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Blind-Date.mp4 Creating Protecting Wealth This is John and Rob's business, where you can get in touch with them if you're interested. John and Rob met on investment and clearly got on. So, the conversation carried beyond the formalities. One of the early conversations they had was on values, because values are so important in alternative investing. Honesty, transparency, being an investor as well as asking others to be investors, etc, etc. It was a great fit for Rob, because he was looking for more passive investments. Property isn't at all passive! And he'd left work for property but realised it sapped a lot of his time. What are clients looking for? What's intriguing is that Rob moved from a property portfolio into alternative investing. How many property investors are rethinking their investments, because they won't be having the same money from and coming into the property market at the moment. It boils down into additional income streams. Now more than ever income streams are being tested. Property is an asset class. But with the bond Rob and John are selling, they are finding their clients already have one or two additional income streams. That's exactly what they're looking for. People who are investing should already know what investing looks and feels like and the risks involved. Bonds There are two types of bond: * Corporate bonds; * And government bonds. Government bonds are sold by the government to raise capital, in a closed group of primary markets and dealers. Corporate bonds are a bit like a loan. You loan a company some money and they give a sort of IOU. In their information memorandum's (IM's), they explain all this by saying why they are raising capital. It's usually to do y x, y and z. Within this, there are two types' there's a fixed income bond (regular basis return) or, on the bond's maturity, you'll receive your investment plus X back. It's one or the other here. Rob and John's bond The minimum is about £100, 000. It's not a retail product of course. The bond is for high net worth or sophisticated investors. It has a fixed rate of return paid quarterly for two years. And, the interest rate is 1.5% a month.

51 MIN3 w ago
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#233 John Moran & Rob Comer – Alternative Investing

#232 Sharon Zehavi – Branding

Sex up your brand with Sharon Zehavi We're talking to Sharon today, all the way from Toronto, Canada, about branding. She's telling us how to sex up your brand! Sex up your brand What a memorable name! Well, you'd expect so from a marketing expert! Graham mentioned she's always wearing red and black and, Sharon says, this is because red and black are very powerful colours. They are associated with passion, fire and risk, boldness. It corresponds with her personality. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Sex-up-your-brand.mp4 The way you're attractive to your target market, of course, depends on who that market is. Everything must be catered to them. For example, Sharon needs to be bold and ballsy to make a statement to her clientele and attract those who, too, want to be ballsy with their marketing and branding. If you know your target market well, which you should, you should know how you need to present yourself to attract the people you want. You should know the sort of messages they will find attractive and intriguing, what questions you can solve for them, etc. For Kevin's brand and the accounting sector, you would look at competency and safety. Maybe organised and done-for-you. Because, the main thing people want from an accountant is their accounts to be taken off their hands and sorted for them. Branding - what they feel about you and what they know about you before they meet you. What helps brand? Sometimes it's not about colour. Sometimes, it's about positioning and credibility. You can sex up your brand by showing how you are different from other people. Sharon says this doesn't mean you have to be so aggressively different that you're unrecognisable from the industry. You just need one thing that makes people choose you over 'any' accountant (for example). Identity http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/What-is-a-brand.mp4 Branding isn't random. Brand is something you build to create an identity people will relate to. That's why Nike or Adidas can produce a t-shirt with just a logo, and it will snapped up by many people. This is because so many recognise and relate to the brand. However, even when you know your target market, you know the values, etc - mistakes will be made. This is the case for small and large companies both. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Do-brands-need-to-preach.mp4 How do you work out what your brand should be in the first place? When you work with a small business where you just have a product or service, the first step is about knowing who your target market is. And really knowing. Identify what their behaviours are like and what their set of values are. As a result, you can connect with them on a different level. Most of the times people decide not to work with you, it's not actually about the product or the service. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Knowing-who-your-client-is.mp4 It's like going on a date: if you know the priorities and the things that the person cares about, and you show them you care about them, then you have a better likelihood a long term relationship can start. Values When you know your values, that will drive every decision you make all the way to customer service, and the emails you send, etc.

58 MINJUL 17
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#232 Sharon Zehavi – Branding

#231 David B Horne – CFO Selling Businesses

CFO Selling Businesses with David B Horne Today we have David Horne with us, talking about selling businesses. He's from big London, but originally Canadian (though Graham though he was American - faux pas there!). But what's a Canadian doing in Ealing? He trained as a chartered accountant with PWC in Canada. Because he can speak fluent German, he wanted to work in a German-speaking office and so he went to Switzerland. From there, he got offered a job by his biggest clients and then transferred with them to London. And the rest his history, we guess. What are you up to today? Today (and for the last 10 years) David has been working exclusively with founders of business. Initially this was in a part-time CFO position. But since, he's done Key Person of Influence programme, by Daniel Priestly (whom Kevin has mentioned on the show). That changed everything. It caused David to change the way he approached who he was, what he did and how he utilised his skills. After that training he became more niche and works with businesses who are looking to scale up and acquire other businesses. He has developed F-A-C-E in order to help businesses scale and develop: * Fund * Acquire * Consolidate * Exit AND he's written a book about it! Though it took David 3 years to start writing the book from being on Priestly's programme, it was a game changer when it came out last year. In its first week, it went to number one in the corporate finance category. And this March, it won the best business self development category in business books. Amazing! Selling businesses and FACE In the noughties, David was CFO for two business and raised a whole lot of equity for those businesses. He's done a lot of work in raising money through both private and public channels. Fund - This is all about the process by which you raise money. How do you go about doing that? What do you have to prepare and what are the different types of investors (family and friends for early stage, angels, and then more institutional means like venture capital). http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Income-and-raising-for-business.mp4 Acquire - Acquire within David's framework is for more established businesses who want to scale up. The fastest way is through acquisition. David wrote many case studies for this in his book. The key point is that, if you've never done this before, don't try do it on your own. There are minefields out there. You need professional people who know what they're talking about there with you. Consolidate - Putting two businesses together. The key challenges are values and culture. The value destruction that comes after a small company and big company are acquired and merged is almost like night follows day for some. But, David does have some examples where it worked. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Business-acquisition-and-value-consolidation.mp4 Exit - Realising your dreams. Begin with the end in mind. A lot of entrepreneurs start off because they've never really though about their 'why' and the drive that pushes you in your endeavours. This FACE methodology is about getting step-by-step exponential growth in your business. It's about selling and buying businesses for growth and development. What else have you got planned to impact the world? Big question. David has focussed on his long term goals, which are Focus4Growth and another project where he contri...

51 MINJUL 10
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#231 David B Horne – CFO Selling Businesses

#230 Rebecca Bitton – Content and Branding

Content and Branding with Rebecca Bitton Today we've got a talented content writer on the show. Graham met Rebecca through the same marketing training and she's on this episode to talk content and branding. Having an expertise that you can teach can be anybody's secret source. A secret source is having something valuable to share so that people can apply it to their lives. You'll also help them reach their goals with your teaching. It's an amazing gift and privilege to do that. The results and progress in clients is something that really excites Rebecca to keep on working. Content and branding: target clients At this point, Rebecca's actually running two businesses. Her main job is teaching, especially with Covid shutting schools down as this means she can run a number of classes online. The next portion of her business is content strategy. Her audience is primarily entrepreneurs, consultants, advisers, etc. A lot of them are big problem-solvers. Rebecca's job is to strategise content that targets their ideal client base and connect with them with engaging content that is valuable and educational. What comes first when strategising content? The thing that should come first is what are their (the client's) biggest problems right now? What can you help them withright now? Really listening and seeking to help their biggest needs helps establish that trust so that, when issues come up in the long term, they look for your help. How do you get the material together (content) to approach those issues? What Rebecca likes to do is 'the fly on the wall' strategy, which is to go wherever the client hangs out. Don't beat them but join them - get into their circles, where do they put their guard down? You want to be putting yourself into the environments where people are open and vulnerable in a genuine way. And it's all about having those listening skills and thinking about what everyone is truly worrying about. As a result, you can respond to that. The content you should be generating is responsive to those issues and concerns. However, that's all dependant on the audience. You don't want to use the same strategy for each prospect since they're going to want different things - it will come across as disingenuous. Audience-centric content is key. That's how you build long-lasting relationships. Switch it up. Nobody wants a one-size-fits-all strategy. People want to feel unique. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Asking-for-marriage-on-the-first-date.mp4 English skills Rebecca has studied and practiced as a writer for many years. Her first career was for a journalist, so story-telling has always been big thing for her. As was language. The approach you take when writing content is so important. Think about how you talk to people in real life; you wouldn't go up to someone and give all your credentials would you? Because people are going to say "well, I don't know you so why would I care?" It's not a two-sided conversation.When writing content, it has to be two-sided; it has to be a conversation. Terminology is also important. If you're talking to financial advisers, for example, you're not going to talk to them about woo-woo subjects such as energy and vibration and calmness. It's not their language. We all have different discourse languages but we need to be tapping into the language your audience knows and is familiar with. Language is a community-thing. That's why Google is so keen on SEO key words. Because, if you speak in the language that people care about, they will a) pick up your content and b) trust your content.

53 MINJUL 3
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#230 Rebecca Bitton – Content and Branding

#229 Justin Leigh – people and growth

People and Growth with Justin Leigh Today we're talking about people and growth with Justin Leigh. He's had such a prestigious career. He worked for 3M for 18 years in various leadership roles. And, he retrained as an executive coach about 2 and a half years ago. Now, he has his own business for executive coaching, marketing leadership and business consultancy. It's called Focus4Growth. Where have you got to now? Justin had previously worked with a coach, as a leader in 3M and recognised the value of it. Some part of it is just having someone to talk to about the business and to get clear on the strategy and the key actions you know you need to take. Coaches help you get traction on the growth initiatives you need to have in a business. Justin liked this experience and decided he would retrain to start a new career path. He set up Focus4Growth with the tagline: "grow your people, grow your business." It's one of the things that he learnt early on. Moving from you generating and managing the growth to managing growth through a team is a delicate transition. Recognising that growing your people is how you grow your business is a really important distinction. People and growth are intrinsically linked. What are your tips for business owners? http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Justins-advice.mp4 * Get clear where the business is going. * Mission or purpose - why does your business even exist? Why is it important that the business thrives and succeeds? This question isn't just for those who own the business. It's important that teams connect with something bigger, because that's where motivation comes from. * Values - what are the principles, practices, standards, conducts that the business is run by and we expect workers to engage with and comply with? Once you've got those three things in place, you can be really clear. As a result, you help your team get them engaged and on board with clarity. So, how do you deliver the growth? It's really important to get the framework clear so that everyone knows what's happening. Businesses need clarity. But then, it's about understanding what your business targets are. What are the performance priorities? Generally speaking, targets are lagging metrics. Metrics come after the work has been done. But the leading metrics are the key activities, opportunities and tasks that need to be accomplished to deliver the numbers. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Clarity-is-everything.mp4 Do we spend time with our teams so that, when they are having conversations, they're asking the right questions? What are the common problems you deal with? It's so varied. However, Justin remembers a key business he still works with. Though it was stable, it was quite erratic. Over a period of 2 years, with Justin's help, they've been able to systemise and get everyone knowing where their place is in line with delivery to the client. They have managed relationship building so proactively that they have grown their business. The main thing Justin has found is that, without some intentional target, businesses drift. Without accountability, motivation is difficult to maintain on our own. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Culling-the-clients-who-dont-do-much-for-your-business.mp4 People and growth: new times offer new perspectives for those in the re...

53 MINJUN 26
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#229 Justin Leigh – people and growth

#228 Michael McDonnell – Confidence

Confidence with Michael McDonnell Today we're hearing from a young man who has overcome a great deal of adversity, to now be an expert in his field - confidence. It's a great story. Michael's journey to confidence For Michael, it started from 2 months old. Michael was born with Cystic Fibrosis, which meant his body overproduced (and overproduces) mucus. This causes complications for his lungs and digestive system (in the main). At the time, there wasn't a lot of information on Cystic Fibrosis. And yet, Michael's parents had to become experts in the field. This lead to their being controlling (although for the right reasons) in regard to where Michael could go, who he could see, etc. However, that obviously puts a lot of pressure on someone when you're restricted greatly. Especially with confidence. Throughout Michael's teenage years, he had cycles of feeling fine and so deciding he wouldn't take his medication (being rebellious if you will), and returning to medication when his condition was bad. The realisation he came to is this: it's not about the doing but the outcome if youstopped doing something. Also, understanding his condition for himself was a major player in gaining confidence with his condition and taking the medication. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Feeling-normal.mp4 Confidence issues Naturally, being 'the odd one out' at school has huge implications for your confidence and wellbeing. This was exactly the case for Michael. When we talk about overcoming our insecurities, there's talk about the stories we tell ourselves that aren't actually true. However, a lot of the stories were true for Michael. He couldn't do certain things because of the conditions and that was a tangible and dangerous reality for him; the conditions weren't necessarily going to get better. Therefore, Michael had to navigate a lot of these situations on his own, He had to figure out what conditions were okay, what weren't and how to overcome them in each scenario. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Lockdown-isolation-parallels.mp4 Funnily enough (and I can relate to this), Michael has realised through lockdown that he is not as introverted as he thought he was. Lockdown has had a huge personal benefit as it has allowed the time for self inspection and understanding. What do you do now? One of the things Michael spends the majority of the time dealing with is helping business owners. Especially if they're online business owners, they can often hide because they're not needed to be seen. They can take a handful of photos and that's it! However, what people can often do is stay in their own heads with thoughts of being invisible. There's so much demand online that there are so many competitors. But, what needs to be done is to put yourself out within your niche and to make yourself desirable. You can't be desirable if you're invisible. Michael's ability to be confident on camera and to be available and present online comes from his personal growth. At first, he was a robot on camera. He had scripts, he dresses up, his eyes would wander and his attention was all over the place. In essence, Michael wasn't any good at doing the things he can do brilliantly now - videos, podcasts, public speaking. What is it about confidence that most of us don't know? There's a bit of a misconception around it because most people who you think are confident are just being themselves. However, that's a half-solution because it implies that you can only be confident - or have the permission be - if you're made a certain way.

52 MINJUN 19
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#228 Michael McDonnell – Confidence

#227 Robert Wright – IPR for Private Label

IPR for Private Labels with Robert Wright Today we're going into the legal space, talking about intellectual property rights (IPR). Robert advises a particularly niche - copyrights and patents for private labels. He focusses on Private Label sellers, because they need to ensure their brands are working for them and they are copyright protected. Private label products China has a huge market for the production of private label products. However, there are other markets too, like India or the Philippines. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/A-sword-and-shield.mp4 Robert loves to work with businesses in the early days and to help them choose an easy and interesting brand name. His top tip is be proactive and use IPR as a shield. Have proper rights that are established. When another company infringes, take them down. You know, there's a reason intellectual property rights exist. You don't have to be a large company like Lego to take your rights seriously through legal action. To what extent is IPR law enforceable across the countries in this online market? The great thing about IPR is that most countries respect trademarks, patents and copyright. Consequently, there's a series of international treaties that can be leveraged to take your rights seriously. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/A-lot-of-work.mp4 There's nothing new under the sun. Whether it's a logo or a brand, there will be marks of similarity. But, that's where you go into the analysis ofhow similar they actually are; * looks * sound * categories of service * the products * the types of consumers. All these things must be considered. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Legal-action-against-you.mp4 In Suits, there's a great scene where one character asks an associate what you do when someone pulls a gun on you. The answer isn't give the money. It's get out a bigger gun - do the ten other options other than give the money. Robert has this attitude when it comes to cease and desist letters. It doesn't mean you give up. Maybe you negotiate a license agreement, or a product negotiation. There are other options other than to panic. Cross-country and IPR for private label If you're in the UK and receive a cease and desist letter from the US, which laws take precedence. Well, Robert whips the answer out pretty quickly. It's the country where you're selling. IPR are ultimately local. When you sell a product in the States, you open yourself up to US jurisdiction. You have to be mindful, therefore, of those trademarks. The best adviser will encourage you to move with purpose. Not to register all sorts of things for the sake of it. Timing is everything for intellectual property. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/UK-vs-US.mp4 Amazon businesses To participate in Amazon's programme, you have to have a registered trademark in the United States. Or, if you want a .co.uk registration, in the UK. It's really interesting to see how Amazon has invested in brand and trademarks. This is because they have become incredibly sophisticated. What's the top three things to know about brand registry development? * Better Listings * Video Ads * Access to a team to report people who are counterfeiting (brand enforcement)

55 MINJUN 12
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#227 Robert Wright – IPR for Private Label

#226 Philip Jepson – Selling your business

Selling your business with PhilJepson Today we have Phil Jepson with us, talking about selling your businesses. He has a business that sells other people's business when they get to the point where they cab't pass it on to someone else. He buys the businesses with a view to building a family of businesses - to advance, hold and then (later down the line) maybe sell. Buying and selling your business Phil ends up with a fairly diverse portfolio of businesses. There's different schools of thought as to whether this is a good or bad thing. Some believe this is good as, during economic decline for instance, it can shelter you from the storm a bit. Others think you should focus on one industry or area. Phil looks at businesses that are across a wide range of sectors but they will end up sitting in 2-3 areas or groups within his portfolio. The key thing about the way Phil approaches his process is this: The process of acquiring business (or even the process before the acquisition) is about getting to know the business owner. Having a rapport with the business owner is really important. Phil wants to know that they have a shared set of values with him, because he doesn't want any nasty shocks. Ultimately, the business will reflect the owner so, if you get to know the business owner, you inevitably get to know the business. The other thing is that actually doing a deal has lots of moving parts. There's a great opportunity for the deal to go off the rails and so knowing the business owner and having a relationship with them makes it more likely that the deal can survive the slings and arrows coming its way. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Win-win-win.mp4 How do you value a business before buying and selling? http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Man-United.mp4 In terms of valuing businesses, there are certain touch stones that you can use and, on top of that, there's a layer of art as supposed to science. This is because there isn't actually a single universally accepted process for valuing a training business. People do it in different ways. What type of businesses are you intent on buying? First criteria is size. Much like Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Phil looks for 'not too small and not too big'; generally, between £1 million and £10 million revenue. On the basis that a £5 million business is generating half a million pounds, it's sort of knocking on the door of Phil's criteria.Now Phil doesn't have a bank of mum and dad, so to speak. But, he does have a circle of trusted people who can invest and trust his judgement as to whether the purchase is good or not - a bank of friends we may say. Covid-19 crisis; isit likely that the valuations are way down as a result? Yes, to a certain extent. If it was a good business before lockdown started, then the likelihood is it will be a good business once it has ended and normality can slowly resume. When you're dealing with SMEs, it's a lot more personal. Whilst business values are on the floor, you can't (essentially) go round like a hoover like other wealthy business people are currently doing. Right now, when looking at buying a business, the first question to ask is viability - is this business going to survive? If you get through that, then normally you'll be looking at the accounts of a business from the last three years. Not just the past couple of months or up to sixth months. It's about forming a balanced view. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Manufacturing-and-recruit...

47 MINJUN 5
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#226 Philip Jepson – Selling your business

Latest Episodes

#235 Joana Lopez – Divorce and Breakup Recovery

Divorce and Breakup Recovery with Joana Lopez On today's podcast, we have Joana Lopez talk to us about divorce and breakup recovery. She is a heartbreak coach from Toronto. Lovely to have her! Joana grew up in Mexico, but moved to Canada when she was very young. It's been home ever since. What does a divorce and breakup coach mean? Basically, Joana works with people through the emotional pain caused by separation. When people go through that separation, the emotional pain can be and is overwhelming and need help processing that. It can really block your mind from focussing on things and so Joana helps entrepreneurs know how to tackle these things to help their business. So, Joana's ideal client is entrepreneurs working through breakups. The moment people are able to get back on their feet, they are able to heal. When in the process of breakups and divorces do people come to you for help? There are 3 levels of the separation process/3 types of client Joana works with: * The client who is still in the relationship and unhappy, and doesn't know how to move forward. It's affecting their business. * It is not the process of separation that's bothering this client - they want the separation. Or, they are undergoing the process of separation because their partner has willed it. * This client has already been dealing with separation for a long period of time and it is affecting their mental health and other aspects of their lives. With all of that, divorce and breakup recovery can be so intense and long-lasting. Joana helps clients work through it in an efficient way so that they can move on. How do you advise that person? http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/How-do-you-advise-people.mp4 Joana helps clients by recognising psychological reactions in the individuals. She has a lot of material to help her clients, because every single client will be different.... But then again, will they have similar characteristics? Joana loves this question! Personally, she finds each story different in each tragedy. However, there are 3 main issues or core problems that Joana and her business solves. A lot of the breakup problems go beyond the break up. This is because we have unconscious patterns and blocks. Therefore, Joana has 3 stages in which she helps the client with heartbreak. * Assess the unconscious blocks and patterns - this is because the problem that clients come with is never theactual problem. * Remove those unconscious patterns and blocks. * Install new, healthy patterns that will help the client form new relationships, either with the person they are separating from, someone new or help them move on entirely. Through this process, Joana helps the client go from tragedy and triumph. Joana's story Joana has always been interested in relationship breakups and what happens in the brain during that event and process. Before that, she was a business and life coach, so personal development has always been her 'thing'. 5 years ago, Joana had a traumatic separation. Going through that pain, she was wondering why she couldn't get past the breakup because she had all the knowledge of personal and neurological development. Why couldn't she get over this person? So, she went through a search of what happens during separation (for a relationship or a marriage). It became a fascinating journey. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Breakups-and-the-brain.mp4

50 MIN1 w ago
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#235 Joana Lopez – Divorce and Breakup Recovery

#234 Reginald Larry-Cole – Compassionate Capitalism

Compassionate Capitalism with Reggie Larry-Cole Today, we have a man talking to us about capitalism. But not just any capitalism - compassionate capitalism. There's a real story behind the book. We hope Reginald's story will inspire you! What's your day job? http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Whats-your-day-job.mp4 What's genius is simple ideas. And it's hard to come up with a simple, effective idea. So well done Reggie, and also well done for the 9 year anniversary of the business! Reggie runs a peer to peer investor operation. Investor's effectively pay for cars for essential/key workers. The story behind this idea and getting funding is one of endurance, perseverance and disappointing starts. Reggie's story to compassionate capitalism Reggie has been working since he was 16 and bought his first home when he was 18. He comes from a wealthy family in terms of achievement. His foundation was strong. Moving to America, Reggie married his teenage lover. However, unfortunately it didn't work out, so he came back to the UK. And, he started to build a business based on fairness. April 15th 2008 came with a credit crunch though. He lost everything - his kids, his business, his home, his family. So, he ended up at a job where he worked for free. Worked for free! He knew the importance of his job when his co-director, Martin, said he didn't work for free. Despite this, Reggie worked diligently to deliver what his managers expected delivering.From there, he and Scott started building a business which is now delivering return. At its heart Buy2LetCarscomes out of a frustration at banks who made it hard for key workers to get a car. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Credit-crunches-covid-and-cars.mp4 How I turned 150 no's into one yes and built a multi-million empire... The end situation of this situation is that Reggie is sat in his office, calling Chris - the one yes! Reggie thanked him, talked to his wife, talked to the dog (naturally), etc. He has a strong relationship with this guy. In April 2008, the company Reggie called was a motor company, because he had the idea of buy-to-let. The manager said it wouldn't work, but he took the letter to his manager. Despite the turmoil of the market, Reggie got what he asked for, because his idea was brilliant. As a result that's how he got started. 150 no's Let's be honest, that's a lot of hearing no! These were all kinds of people saying no and charlatans trying to steal Reggie's idea too! http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Lots-of-nos.mp4 If you want to start a restaurant, buy the food and sell the food is capitalism. Society has got to the stage where we say give the money and I won't do anything. That's abuse. We do a lot of things for nothing. Hopefully the turmoil we are experiencing now brings certain things to light and changes how capitalism is working. This business is a win-win business. Why? Well those leasing the cars love it because they don't break down - they're new! And for those investing, 4% is the lowest amount of dissatisfaction that inv...

59 MIN2 w ago
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#234 Reginald Larry-Cole – Compassionate Capitalism

#233 John Moran & Rob Comer – Alternative Investing

Alternative Investing with John Moran and Rob Comer We've never had 2 guests on the podcast at the same time! So it's a first today. We have Rob Comer and John Moran with us, talking about alternative investing. Alternative investing is a sector Rob and John have been in for some time. They help people find great ways to gain money in alternative ways and are going to help us understand them more. What are your backgrounds and how did you come into alternative investing? Alternative ways to generate income are on a lot of people's minds right now. When Rob started looking into it some years ago now, he went down the traditional route of building a portfolio in properties.Rob's background was property investing and he was trying to stop trading time for money. In contrast, John left full-time employment 5-6 years ago. He was introduced to an investor and the world of investments. Well, after that he took the plunge! http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/John-first-meets-Rob.mp4 Well, John's nickname is honest John! In fact, Graham remembers John's antics on Blind Date when he won! http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Blind-Date.mp4 Creating Protecting Wealth This is John and Rob's business, where you can get in touch with them if you're interested. John and Rob met on investment and clearly got on. So, the conversation carried beyond the formalities. One of the early conversations they had was on values, because values are so important in alternative investing. Honesty, transparency, being an investor as well as asking others to be investors, etc, etc. It was a great fit for Rob, because he was looking for more passive investments. Property isn't at all passive! And he'd left work for property but realised it sapped a lot of his time. What are clients looking for? What's intriguing is that Rob moved from a property portfolio into alternative investing. How many property investors are rethinking their investments, because they won't be having the same money from and coming into the property market at the moment. It boils down into additional income streams. Now more than ever income streams are being tested. Property is an asset class. But with the bond Rob and John are selling, they are finding their clients already have one or two additional income streams. That's exactly what they're looking for. People who are investing should already know what investing looks and feels like and the risks involved. Bonds There are two types of bond: * Corporate bonds; * And government bonds. Government bonds are sold by the government to raise capital, in a closed group of primary markets and dealers. Corporate bonds are a bit like a loan. You loan a company some money and they give a sort of IOU. In their information memorandum's (IM's), they explain all this by saying why they are raising capital. It's usually to do y x, y and z. Within this, there are two types' there's a fixed income bond (regular basis return) or, on the bond's maturity, you'll receive your investment plus X back. It's one or the other here. Rob and John's bond The minimum is about £100, 000. It's not a retail product of course. The bond is for high net worth or sophisticated investors. It has a fixed rate of return paid quarterly for two years. And, the interest rate is 1.5% a month.

51 MIN3 w ago
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#233 John Moran & Rob Comer – Alternative Investing

#232 Sharon Zehavi – Branding

Sex up your brand with Sharon Zehavi We're talking to Sharon today, all the way from Toronto, Canada, about branding. She's telling us how to sex up your brand! Sex up your brand What a memorable name! Well, you'd expect so from a marketing expert! Graham mentioned she's always wearing red and black and, Sharon says, this is because red and black are very powerful colours. They are associated with passion, fire and risk, boldness. It corresponds with her personality. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Sex-up-your-brand.mp4 The way you're attractive to your target market, of course, depends on who that market is. Everything must be catered to them. For example, Sharon needs to be bold and ballsy to make a statement to her clientele and attract those who, too, want to be ballsy with their marketing and branding. If you know your target market well, which you should, you should know how you need to present yourself to attract the people you want. You should know the sort of messages they will find attractive and intriguing, what questions you can solve for them, etc. For Kevin's brand and the accounting sector, you would look at competency and safety. Maybe organised and done-for-you. Because, the main thing people want from an accountant is their accounts to be taken off their hands and sorted for them. Branding - what they feel about you and what they know about you before they meet you. What helps brand? Sometimes it's not about colour. Sometimes, it's about positioning and credibility. You can sex up your brand by showing how you are different from other people. Sharon says this doesn't mean you have to be so aggressively different that you're unrecognisable from the industry. You just need one thing that makes people choose you over 'any' accountant (for example). Identity http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/What-is-a-brand.mp4 Branding isn't random. Brand is something you build to create an identity people will relate to. That's why Nike or Adidas can produce a t-shirt with just a logo, and it will snapped up by many people. This is because so many recognise and relate to the brand. However, even when you know your target market, you know the values, etc - mistakes will be made. This is the case for small and large companies both. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Do-brands-need-to-preach.mp4 How do you work out what your brand should be in the first place? When you work with a small business where you just have a product or service, the first step is about knowing who your target market is. And really knowing. Identify what their behaviours are like and what their set of values are. As a result, you can connect with them on a different level. Most of the times people decide not to work with you, it's not actually about the product or the service. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Knowing-who-your-client-is.mp4 It's like going on a date: if you know the priorities and the things that the person cares about, and you show them you care about them, then you have a better likelihood a long term relationship can start. Values When you know your values, that will drive every decision you make all the way to customer service, and the emails you send, etc.

58 MINJUL 17
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#232 Sharon Zehavi – Branding

#231 David B Horne – CFO Selling Businesses

CFO Selling Businesses with David B Horne Today we have David Horne with us, talking about selling businesses. He's from big London, but originally Canadian (though Graham though he was American - faux pas there!). But what's a Canadian doing in Ealing? He trained as a chartered accountant with PWC in Canada. Because he can speak fluent German, he wanted to work in a German-speaking office and so he went to Switzerland. From there, he got offered a job by his biggest clients and then transferred with them to London. And the rest his history, we guess. What are you up to today? Today (and for the last 10 years) David has been working exclusively with founders of business. Initially this was in a part-time CFO position. But since, he's done Key Person of Influence programme, by Daniel Priestly (whom Kevin has mentioned on the show). That changed everything. It caused David to change the way he approached who he was, what he did and how he utilised his skills. After that training he became more niche and works with businesses who are looking to scale up and acquire other businesses. He has developed F-A-C-E in order to help businesses scale and develop: * Fund * Acquire * Consolidate * Exit AND he's written a book about it! Though it took David 3 years to start writing the book from being on Priestly's programme, it was a game changer when it came out last year. In its first week, it went to number one in the corporate finance category. And this March, it won the best business self development category in business books. Amazing! Selling businesses and FACE In the noughties, David was CFO for two business and raised a whole lot of equity for those businesses. He's done a lot of work in raising money through both private and public channels. Fund - This is all about the process by which you raise money. How do you go about doing that? What do you have to prepare and what are the different types of investors (family and friends for early stage, angels, and then more institutional means like venture capital). http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Income-and-raising-for-business.mp4 Acquire - Acquire within David's framework is for more established businesses who want to scale up. The fastest way is through acquisition. David wrote many case studies for this in his book. The key point is that, if you've never done this before, don't try do it on your own. There are minefields out there. You need professional people who know what they're talking about there with you. Consolidate - Putting two businesses together. The key challenges are values and culture. The value destruction that comes after a small company and big company are acquired and merged is almost like night follows day for some. But, David does have some examples where it worked. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Business-acquisition-and-value-consolidation.mp4 Exit - Realising your dreams. Begin with the end in mind. A lot of entrepreneurs start off because they've never really though about their 'why' and the drive that pushes you in your endeavours. This FACE methodology is about getting step-by-step exponential growth in your business. It's about selling and buying businesses for growth and development. What else have you got planned to impact the world? Big question. David has focussed on his long term goals, which are Focus4Growth and another project where he contri...

51 MINJUL 10
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#231 David B Horne – CFO Selling Businesses

#230 Rebecca Bitton – Content and Branding

Content and Branding with Rebecca Bitton Today we've got a talented content writer on the show. Graham met Rebecca through the same marketing training and she's on this episode to talk content and branding. Having an expertise that you can teach can be anybody's secret source. A secret source is having something valuable to share so that people can apply it to their lives. You'll also help them reach their goals with your teaching. It's an amazing gift and privilege to do that. The results and progress in clients is something that really excites Rebecca to keep on working. Content and branding: target clients At this point, Rebecca's actually running two businesses. Her main job is teaching, especially with Covid shutting schools down as this means she can run a number of classes online. The next portion of her business is content strategy. Her audience is primarily entrepreneurs, consultants, advisers, etc. A lot of them are big problem-solvers. Rebecca's job is to strategise content that targets their ideal client base and connect with them with engaging content that is valuable and educational. What comes first when strategising content? The thing that should come first is what are their (the client's) biggest problems right now? What can you help them withright now? Really listening and seeking to help their biggest needs helps establish that trust so that, when issues come up in the long term, they look for your help. How do you get the material together (content) to approach those issues? What Rebecca likes to do is 'the fly on the wall' strategy, which is to go wherever the client hangs out. Don't beat them but join them - get into their circles, where do they put their guard down? You want to be putting yourself into the environments where people are open and vulnerable in a genuine way. And it's all about having those listening skills and thinking about what everyone is truly worrying about. As a result, you can respond to that. The content you should be generating is responsive to those issues and concerns. However, that's all dependant on the audience. You don't want to use the same strategy for each prospect since they're going to want different things - it will come across as disingenuous. Audience-centric content is key. That's how you build long-lasting relationships. Switch it up. Nobody wants a one-size-fits-all strategy. People want to feel unique. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Asking-for-marriage-on-the-first-date.mp4 English skills Rebecca has studied and practiced as a writer for many years. Her first career was for a journalist, so story-telling has always been big thing for her. As was language. The approach you take when writing content is so important. Think about how you talk to people in real life; you wouldn't go up to someone and give all your credentials would you? Because people are going to say "well, I don't know you so why would I care?" It's not a two-sided conversation.When writing content, it has to be two-sided; it has to be a conversation. Terminology is also important. If you're talking to financial advisers, for example, you're not going to talk to them about woo-woo subjects such as energy and vibration and calmness. It's not their language. We all have different discourse languages but we need to be tapping into the language your audience knows and is familiar with. Language is a community-thing. That's why Google is so keen on SEO key words. Because, if you speak in the language that people care about, they will a) pick up your content and b) trust your content.

53 MINJUL 3
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#230 Rebecca Bitton – Content and Branding

#229 Justin Leigh – people and growth

People and Growth with Justin Leigh Today we're talking about people and growth with Justin Leigh. He's had such a prestigious career. He worked for 3M for 18 years in various leadership roles. And, he retrained as an executive coach about 2 and a half years ago. Now, he has his own business for executive coaching, marketing leadership and business consultancy. It's called Focus4Growth. Where have you got to now? Justin had previously worked with a coach, as a leader in 3M and recognised the value of it. Some part of it is just having someone to talk to about the business and to get clear on the strategy and the key actions you know you need to take. Coaches help you get traction on the growth initiatives you need to have in a business. Justin liked this experience and decided he would retrain to start a new career path. He set up Focus4Growth with the tagline: "grow your people, grow your business." It's one of the things that he learnt early on. Moving from you generating and managing the growth to managing growth through a team is a delicate transition. Recognising that growing your people is how you grow your business is a really important distinction. People and growth are intrinsically linked. What are your tips for business owners? http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Justins-advice.mp4 * Get clear where the business is going. * Mission or purpose - why does your business even exist? Why is it important that the business thrives and succeeds? This question isn't just for those who own the business. It's important that teams connect with something bigger, because that's where motivation comes from. * Values - what are the principles, practices, standards, conducts that the business is run by and we expect workers to engage with and comply with? Once you've got those three things in place, you can be really clear. As a result, you help your team get them engaged and on board with clarity. So, how do you deliver the growth? It's really important to get the framework clear so that everyone knows what's happening. Businesses need clarity. But then, it's about understanding what your business targets are. What are the performance priorities? Generally speaking, targets are lagging metrics. Metrics come after the work has been done. But the leading metrics are the key activities, opportunities and tasks that need to be accomplished to deliver the numbers. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Clarity-is-everything.mp4 Do we spend time with our teams so that, when they are having conversations, they're asking the right questions? What are the common problems you deal with? It's so varied. However, Justin remembers a key business he still works with. Though it was stable, it was quite erratic. Over a period of 2 years, with Justin's help, they've been able to systemise and get everyone knowing where their place is in line with delivery to the client. They have managed relationship building so proactively that they have grown their business. The main thing Justin has found is that, without some intentional target, businesses drift. Without accountability, motivation is difficult to maintain on our own. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Culling-the-clients-who-dont-do-much-for-your-business.mp4 People and growth: new times offer new perspectives for those in the re...

53 MINJUN 26
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#229 Justin Leigh – people and growth

#228 Michael McDonnell – Confidence

Confidence with Michael McDonnell Today we're hearing from a young man who has overcome a great deal of adversity, to now be an expert in his field - confidence. It's a great story. Michael's journey to confidence For Michael, it started from 2 months old. Michael was born with Cystic Fibrosis, which meant his body overproduced (and overproduces) mucus. This causes complications for his lungs and digestive system (in the main). At the time, there wasn't a lot of information on Cystic Fibrosis. And yet, Michael's parents had to become experts in the field. This lead to their being controlling (although for the right reasons) in regard to where Michael could go, who he could see, etc. However, that obviously puts a lot of pressure on someone when you're restricted greatly. Especially with confidence. Throughout Michael's teenage years, he had cycles of feeling fine and so deciding he wouldn't take his medication (being rebellious if you will), and returning to medication when his condition was bad. The realisation he came to is this: it's not about the doing but the outcome if youstopped doing something. Also, understanding his condition for himself was a major player in gaining confidence with his condition and taking the medication. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Feeling-normal.mp4 Confidence issues Naturally, being 'the odd one out' at school has huge implications for your confidence and wellbeing. This was exactly the case for Michael. When we talk about overcoming our insecurities, there's talk about the stories we tell ourselves that aren't actually true. However, a lot of the stories were true for Michael. He couldn't do certain things because of the conditions and that was a tangible and dangerous reality for him; the conditions weren't necessarily going to get better. Therefore, Michael had to navigate a lot of these situations on his own, He had to figure out what conditions were okay, what weren't and how to overcome them in each scenario. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Lockdown-isolation-parallels.mp4 Funnily enough (and I can relate to this), Michael has realised through lockdown that he is not as introverted as he thought he was. Lockdown has had a huge personal benefit as it has allowed the time for self inspection and understanding. What do you do now? One of the things Michael spends the majority of the time dealing with is helping business owners. Especially if they're online business owners, they can often hide because they're not needed to be seen. They can take a handful of photos and that's it! However, what people can often do is stay in their own heads with thoughts of being invisible. There's so much demand online that there are so many competitors. But, what needs to be done is to put yourself out within your niche and to make yourself desirable. You can't be desirable if you're invisible. Michael's ability to be confident on camera and to be available and present online comes from his personal growth. At first, he was a robot on camera. He had scripts, he dresses up, his eyes would wander and his attention was all over the place. In essence, Michael wasn't any good at doing the things he can do brilliantly now - videos, podcasts, public speaking. What is it about confidence that most of us don't know? There's a bit of a misconception around it because most people who you think are confident are just being themselves. However, that's a half-solution because it implies that you can only be confident - or have the permission be - if you're made a certain way.

52 MINJUN 19
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#228 Michael McDonnell – Confidence

#227 Robert Wright – IPR for Private Label

IPR for Private Labels with Robert Wright Today we're going into the legal space, talking about intellectual property rights (IPR). Robert advises a particularly niche - copyrights and patents for private labels. He focusses on Private Label sellers, because they need to ensure their brands are working for them and they are copyright protected. Private label products China has a huge market for the production of private label products. However, there are other markets too, like India or the Philippines. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/A-sword-and-shield.mp4 Robert loves to work with businesses in the early days and to help them choose an easy and interesting brand name. His top tip is be proactive and use IPR as a shield. Have proper rights that are established. When another company infringes, take them down. You know, there's a reason intellectual property rights exist. You don't have to be a large company like Lego to take your rights seriously through legal action. To what extent is IPR law enforceable across the countries in this online market? The great thing about IPR is that most countries respect trademarks, patents and copyright. Consequently, there's a series of international treaties that can be leveraged to take your rights seriously. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/A-lot-of-work.mp4 There's nothing new under the sun. Whether it's a logo or a brand, there will be marks of similarity. But, that's where you go into the analysis ofhow similar they actually are; * looks * sound * categories of service * the products * the types of consumers. All these things must be considered. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Legal-action-against-you.mp4 In Suits, there's a great scene where one character asks an associate what you do when someone pulls a gun on you. The answer isn't give the money. It's get out a bigger gun - do the ten other options other than give the money. Robert has this attitude when it comes to cease and desist letters. It doesn't mean you give up. Maybe you negotiate a license agreement, or a product negotiation. There are other options other than to panic. Cross-country and IPR for private label If you're in the UK and receive a cease and desist letter from the US, which laws take precedence. Well, Robert whips the answer out pretty quickly. It's the country where you're selling. IPR are ultimately local. When you sell a product in the States, you open yourself up to US jurisdiction. You have to be mindful, therefore, of those trademarks. The best adviser will encourage you to move with purpose. Not to register all sorts of things for the sake of it. Timing is everything for intellectual property. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/UK-vs-US.mp4 Amazon businesses To participate in Amazon's programme, you have to have a registered trademark in the United States. Or, if you want a .co.uk registration, in the UK. It's really interesting to see how Amazon has invested in brand and trademarks. This is because they have become incredibly sophisticated. What's the top three things to know about brand registry development? * Better Listings * Video Ads * Access to a team to report people who are counterfeiting (brand enforcement)

55 MINJUN 12
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#227 Robert Wright – IPR for Private Label

#226 Philip Jepson – Selling your business

Selling your business with PhilJepson Today we have Phil Jepson with us, talking about selling your businesses. He has a business that sells other people's business when they get to the point where they cab't pass it on to someone else. He buys the businesses with a view to building a family of businesses - to advance, hold and then (later down the line) maybe sell. Buying and selling your business Phil ends up with a fairly diverse portfolio of businesses. There's different schools of thought as to whether this is a good or bad thing. Some believe this is good as, during economic decline for instance, it can shelter you from the storm a bit. Others think you should focus on one industry or area. Phil looks at businesses that are across a wide range of sectors but they will end up sitting in 2-3 areas or groups within his portfolio. The key thing about the way Phil approaches his process is this: The process of acquiring business (or even the process before the acquisition) is about getting to know the business owner. Having a rapport with the business owner is really important. Phil wants to know that they have a shared set of values with him, because he doesn't want any nasty shocks. Ultimately, the business will reflect the owner so, if you get to know the business owner, you inevitably get to know the business. The other thing is that actually doing a deal has lots of moving parts. There's a great opportunity for the deal to go off the rails and so knowing the business owner and having a relationship with them makes it more likely that the deal can survive the slings and arrows coming its way. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Win-win-win.mp4 How do you value a business before buying and selling? http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Man-United.mp4 In terms of valuing businesses, there are certain touch stones that you can use and, on top of that, there's a layer of art as supposed to science. This is because there isn't actually a single universally accepted process for valuing a training business. People do it in different ways. What type of businesses are you intent on buying? First criteria is size. Much like Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Phil looks for 'not too small and not too big'; generally, between £1 million and £10 million revenue. On the basis that a £5 million business is generating half a million pounds, it's sort of knocking on the door of Phil's criteria.Now Phil doesn't have a bank of mum and dad, so to speak. But, he does have a circle of trusted people who can invest and trust his judgement as to whether the purchase is good or not - a bank of friends we may say. Covid-19 crisis; isit likely that the valuations are way down as a result? Yes, to a certain extent. If it was a good business before lockdown started, then the likelihood is it will be a good business once it has ended and normality can slowly resume. When you're dealing with SMEs, it's a lot more personal. Whilst business values are on the floor, you can't (essentially) go round like a hoover like other wealthy business people are currently doing. Right now, when looking at buying a business, the first question to ask is viability - is this business going to survive? If you get through that, then normally you'll be looking at the accounts of a business from the last three years. Not just the past couple of months or up to sixth months. It's about forming a balanced view. http://thenext100days.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Manufacturing-and-recruit...

47 MINJUN 5
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#226 Philip Jepson – Selling your business
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