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BBC Earth Podcast

BBC Earth

589
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1.8K
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BBC Earth Podcast

BBC Earth Podcast

BBC Earth

589
Followers
1.8K
Plays
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About Us

Intimate stories and surprising truths about nature, science and the human experience in a podcast the size of the planet.

Each week the BBC Earth podcast brings you a collection of immersive stories about our world and the astonishing creatures, landscapes and elements in it. Close your eyes and open your ears as you travel from the impenetrable forests of Uganda to research bases in the Antarctic; the edges of the Thar Desert to the Shores of Lake Tahoe. You’ll get up close and personal with jewelled beetles in the Namib Desert and soar with eagles in Rajasthan as you experience tales of human emotion, of encounters with animals, of the strangest corners of the Earth and breath-taking marvels. All carefully gathered together and delivered into your ear by the good people at BBC Earth.

From the deepest caves in the world to the very edge of space the BBC Earth podcast transports you on an awe-inspiring journey in sound.

Latest Episodes

My best friend was an octopus

We've reached the end of Series 3! It's been a series of new discoveries, awe-inspiring moments, tear-jerkers and revelations. In the final episode of the series, we are telling stories about the senses. We begin by meeting Sy Montgomery, who built a bond with an eight limbed friend through touch. Octopi have the unique ability to taste what they are touching using the suction cups on their tentacles; some are more sensitive than others and it became clear to Sy that a friendship had been born. Hear from legendary composer, Hans Zimmer, as he describes the process of composing for natural history documentaries - such as Seven Worlds, One Planet - and how these thought provoking series differs from his work on iconic, blockbuster movie soundtracks. In this episode we also tell the story of Bernie Krause who is a "soundscape ecologist", responsible for tracking and recording the sounds of our planet which are rapidly vanishing. Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Eart...

30 MIN2019 DEC 19
Comments
My best friend was an octopus

This river is legally a “person”

In this episode of the BBC Earth Podcast, we’re getting glimpses into brave new worlds, advancing into unfamiliar territories and breaking new ground. We’re pushing at the frontiers between us and the natural world. In New Zealand there is a river so integral to the history of the Maori people, it has just been granted "personhood". It has been a fight fought for 140 years but finally, this giver of life and symbol of rich history has the same legal rights as the human beings that love it so much. This week we reveal stories of discovery from tiny tales of moss to the unexplored and vast ocean floor. We listen to James, a rhino keeper who talks about the plight of a species which is "functionally extinct": the Northern White Rhino. There are only two left in the world but conservation scientists have hope; using Southern White Rhinos as surrogates, the scientists are taking on a pioneering mission to bring the species to term. Make sure you're subscribed so you never miss an episo...

2 s2019 DEC 12
Comments
This river is legally a “person”

Frozen squirrels and the human brain

For the seventh episode of the BBC Earth Podcast, we’re bringing your stories about adaptation. Did you know, during its 8 month hibernation, theArctic ground squirrelcan survive with a core temperature of 3 degrees below freezing? Scientists have been studying this astounding little rodent’s long, cold sleep to understand whetheritshibernation can help revolutioniseunderstanding of our own brains.We also meet the‘Lightning Bug Lady’Lynn Faustwhohas studied fireflies her entire life and tells us about the beautiful display these creatures put on,when trying to attract a mate. We speak to a man who describes nature’s resurgence following the catastrophic nuclear disaster in Chernobyl and get to grips with somesurprising silver linings to a humancatastrophe. Make sure you're subscribed so you never miss an episode and let us know what you thought of this week's episode on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bbcearth/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bbcearth/ Twi...

29 MIN2019 DEC 5
Comments
Frozen squirrels and the human brain

The singing sand dunes of the Sahara

Welcome to another episode of the BBC Earth Podcast; the podcast that delves deep into nature’s great mysteries and surfaces the unknown. This week we’re telling stories of the unexpected, stories which seem too astounding to be true. Journey with us to the Sahara where the sand is known to sing; deep, bassy sounds that reverberate as the millions upon millions of grains fall down the dunes. From the unknown cause of these sounds to the unknown status of a species, let us take you back to the 1930s, when the Tasmanian Tiger was confirmed “extinct”. Unlike the tiger you have pictured in your imagination, this one was more dog-like, with stripes across its back and a tail not dissimilar to that of a kangaroo. There have supposedly been 8 sightings of this creature in the last 3 years, suggesting science should not give up on it just yet… Should these stories leave you perplexed, just wait until you hear from Doug Larson who was the first to discover an ancient forest, undisturbed...

28 MIN2019 NOV 28
Comments
The singing sand dunes of the Sahara

The music that makes camels cry

This week we are telling stories from the wilderness. Stories of scale, vast expanses, extreme conditions, little known corners of the planet and the sparsest environments. We begin in Alaska, with the tale of an unbreakable bond between a dogsled racer and her pack, who travel huge distances across rugged terrain. Diving deep to the ocean floor, we join Deep Sea Biologist, Diva Amon, to discover new species and understand the threats that lie beneath. Meet the camera operators who filmed flightless birds that resemble dinosaurs for Seven Worlds, One Planet and hear the magical music that helps camels through birth and makes them shed a tear or two. Make sure you're subscribed so you never miss an episode and let us know what you thought of this week's episode on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bbcearth/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bbcearth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/bbcearth See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

30 MIN2019 NOV 21
Comments
The music that makes camels cry

This corridor of trees unites 20 countries

This week on the BBC Earth Podcast, we are sharing stories of unity. Hear the story behind the international mission of 20 African countries to hold back the desert and plant trees to reclaim the once lush oasis of oasis and greenery. We also discover the unique relationship between a toad and tarantula who choose to be roommates as well as a migration miracle: a three-thousand mile oceanic journey across the Sargasso Sea is made by a transparent animal half the width of a pencil. Make sure you're subscribed so you never miss an episode and let us know what you thought of this week's episode on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bbcearth/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bbcearth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/bbcearth See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

28 MIN2019 NOV 14
Comments
This corridor of trees unites 20 countries

The rhino that flew 10,000 miles

This week we're travelling to a place that is different for all of us, but one we all hold close to our hearts: Home. Listen to the heart-warming story of a keeper in Ohio who built an unbreakable bond with a baby Sumatran rhino named Harapan. Sumatran Rhinos are facing extinction and Harapan was the last remaining in the Western Hemisphere, kept in captivity at Cincinnati Zoo. To give the species the best chance of survival in the wild, Harapan was to fly across the world and return to the home of his ancestors – Sumatra, Indonesia. We also visit the man who keeps a flock of homing pigeons in his back garden in London and two young women who tracked down the symbol of their heritage – the American Bison of Banff National Park. Make sure you're subscribed so you never miss an episode and let us know what you thought of this week's episode on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bbcearth/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bbcearth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/bbcear...

28 MIN2019 NOV 7
Comments
The rhino that flew 10,000 miles

Hitching a lift to the bottom of the world

Welcome to the third series of the BBC Earth Podcast. This time, we’re taking you behind the scenes and sharing untold stories from our latest landmark series, Seven Worlds One Planet, from the perspective of camera crew, producers, researchers and scientists alike. Alongside these stories, you’ll hear tales from people all over the planet, exploring the huge array of environments on our planet, from the beauty of vast sand dunes to the eerie deep sea floor; unveiling the harsh reality of disappearing species and miraculous rediscoveries of animals thought to be nearing extinction. In this first episode we hear about the dramatic journey the crew of Seven Worlds One Planet took to reach Antarctica, from Executive Producer Jonny Keeling. They travelled through hell and (very) high waters to film leopard seals hunting penguins for five weeks and it was no mean feat. If you've ever wondered who is responsible for naming newly discovered species - look no further; Quentin Wheeler lets...

29 MIN2019 OCT 31
Comments
Hitching a lift to the bottom of the world

Series 3 - Trailer

The BBC Earth Podcast is back from Thursday 31st October. This series, we're taking you behind the scenes and sharing untold stories from our latest television series, Seven Worlds One Planet. Alongside these stories, you'll hear tales from all over the planet, from vast sand dunes, to the eerie deep sea floor. It's time to close your eyes, open your ears and subscribe so you never miss an episode. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1 MIN2019 OCT 18
Comments
Series 3 - Trailer

Looking Up

Welcome to the final episode of the BBC Earth Podcast, Series 2. This series we've told stories about the amazing animals that live among us, and discovered the amazing technology that helps us get close to them; we've looked down on the wonder of our planet from above, and met the people who are working hard to take better care of it. For our final journey, we're looking beyond Earth, out through our thinning atmosphere to the stars and the depths of space. Make sure you're subscribed so you don't miss us, when we return for Series 3, and let us know what you think on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bbcearth/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bbcearth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/bbcearth See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

27 MIN2019 MAY 9
Comments
Looking Up

Latest Episodes

My best friend was an octopus

We've reached the end of Series 3! It's been a series of new discoveries, awe-inspiring moments, tear-jerkers and revelations. In the final episode of the series, we are telling stories about the senses. We begin by meeting Sy Montgomery, who built a bond with an eight limbed friend through touch. Octopi have the unique ability to taste what they are touching using the suction cups on their tentacles; some are more sensitive than others and it became clear to Sy that a friendship had been born. Hear from legendary composer, Hans Zimmer, as he describes the process of composing for natural history documentaries - such as Seven Worlds, One Planet - and how these thought provoking series differs from his work on iconic, blockbuster movie soundtracks. In this episode we also tell the story of Bernie Krause who is a "soundscape ecologist", responsible for tracking and recording the sounds of our planet which are rapidly vanishing. Thank you for listening to another series of the BBC Eart...

30 MIN2019 DEC 19
Comments
My best friend was an octopus

This river is legally a “person”

In this episode of the BBC Earth Podcast, we’re getting glimpses into brave new worlds, advancing into unfamiliar territories and breaking new ground. We’re pushing at the frontiers between us and the natural world. In New Zealand there is a river so integral to the history of the Maori people, it has just been granted "personhood". It has been a fight fought for 140 years but finally, this giver of life and symbol of rich history has the same legal rights as the human beings that love it so much. This week we reveal stories of discovery from tiny tales of moss to the unexplored and vast ocean floor. We listen to James, a rhino keeper who talks about the plight of a species which is "functionally extinct": the Northern White Rhino. There are only two left in the world but conservation scientists have hope; using Southern White Rhinos as surrogates, the scientists are taking on a pioneering mission to bring the species to term. Make sure you're subscribed so you never miss an episo...

2 s2019 DEC 12
Comments
This river is legally a “person”

Frozen squirrels and the human brain

For the seventh episode of the BBC Earth Podcast, we’re bringing your stories about adaptation. Did you know, during its 8 month hibernation, theArctic ground squirrelcan survive with a core temperature of 3 degrees below freezing? Scientists have been studying this astounding little rodent’s long, cold sleep to understand whetheritshibernation can help revolutioniseunderstanding of our own brains.We also meet the‘Lightning Bug Lady’Lynn Faustwhohas studied fireflies her entire life and tells us about the beautiful display these creatures put on,when trying to attract a mate. We speak to a man who describes nature’s resurgence following the catastrophic nuclear disaster in Chernobyl and get to grips with somesurprising silver linings to a humancatastrophe. Make sure you're subscribed so you never miss an episode and let us know what you thought of this week's episode on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bbcearth/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bbcearth/ Twi...

29 MIN2019 DEC 5
Comments
Frozen squirrels and the human brain

The singing sand dunes of the Sahara

Welcome to another episode of the BBC Earth Podcast; the podcast that delves deep into nature’s great mysteries and surfaces the unknown. This week we’re telling stories of the unexpected, stories which seem too astounding to be true. Journey with us to the Sahara where the sand is known to sing; deep, bassy sounds that reverberate as the millions upon millions of grains fall down the dunes. From the unknown cause of these sounds to the unknown status of a species, let us take you back to the 1930s, when the Tasmanian Tiger was confirmed “extinct”. Unlike the tiger you have pictured in your imagination, this one was more dog-like, with stripes across its back and a tail not dissimilar to that of a kangaroo. There have supposedly been 8 sightings of this creature in the last 3 years, suggesting science should not give up on it just yet… Should these stories leave you perplexed, just wait until you hear from Doug Larson who was the first to discover an ancient forest, undisturbed...

28 MIN2019 NOV 28
Comments
The singing sand dunes of the Sahara

The music that makes camels cry

This week we are telling stories from the wilderness. Stories of scale, vast expanses, extreme conditions, little known corners of the planet and the sparsest environments. We begin in Alaska, with the tale of an unbreakable bond between a dogsled racer and her pack, who travel huge distances across rugged terrain. Diving deep to the ocean floor, we join Deep Sea Biologist, Diva Amon, to discover new species and understand the threats that lie beneath. Meet the camera operators who filmed flightless birds that resemble dinosaurs for Seven Worlds, One Planet and hear the magical music that helps camels through birth and makes them shed a tear or two. Make sure you're subscribed so you never miss an episode and let us know what you thought of this week's episode on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bbcearth/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bbcearth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/bbcearth See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

30 MIN2019 NOV 21
Comments
The music that makes camels cry

This corridor of trees unites 20 countries

This week on the BBC Earth Podcast, we are sharing stories of unity. Hear the story behind the international mission of 20 African countries to hold back the desert and plant trees to reclaim the once lush oasis of oasis and greenery. We also discover the unique relationship between a toad and tarantula who choose to be roommates as well as a migration miracle: a three-thousand mile oceanic journey across the Sargasso Sea is made by a transparent animal half the width of a pencil. Make sure you're subscribed so you never miss an episode and let us know what you thought of this week's episode on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bbcearth/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bbcearth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/bbcearth See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

28 MIN2019 NOV 14
Comments
This corridor of trees unites 20 countries

The rhino that flew 10,000 miles

This week we're travelling to a place that is different for all of us, but one we all hold close to our hearts: Home. Listen to the heart-warming story of a keeper in Ohio who built an unbreakable bond with a baby Sumatran rhino named Harapan. Sumatran Rhinos are facing extinction and Harapan was the last remaining in the Western Hemisphere, kept in captivity at Cincinnati Zoo. To give the species the best chance of survival in the wild, Harapan was to fly across the world and return to the home of his ancestors – Sumatra, Indonesia. We also visit the man who keeps a flock of homing pigeons in his back garden in London and two young women who tracked down the symbol of their heritage – the American Bison of Banff National Park. Make sure you're subscribed so you never miss an episode and let us know what you thought of this week's episode on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bbcearth/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bbcearth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/bbcear...

28 MIN2019 NOV 7
Comments
The rhino that flew 10,000 miles

Hitching a lift to the bottom of the world

Welcome to the third series of the BBC Earth Podcast. This time, we’re taking you behind the scenes and sharing untold stories from our latest landmark series, Seven Worlds One Planet, from the perspective of camera crew, producers, researchers and scientists alike. Alongside these stories, you’ll hear tales from people all over the planet, exploring the huge array of environments on our planet, from the beauty of vast sand dunes to the eerie deep sea floor; unveiling the harsh reality of disappearing species and miraculous rediscoveries of animals thought to be nearing extinction. In this first episode we hear about the dramatic journey the crew of Seven Worlds One Planet took to reach Antarctica, from Executive Producer Jonny Keeling. They travelled through hell and (very) high waters to film leopard seals hunting penguins for five weeks and it was no mean feat. If you've ever wondered who is responsible for naming newly discovered species - look no further; Quentin Wheeler lets...

29 MIN2019 OCT 31
Comments
Hitching a lift to the bottom of the world

Series 3 - Trailer

The BBC Earth Podcast is back from Thursday 31st October. This series, we're taking you behind the scenes and sharing untold stories from our latest television series, Seven Worlds One Planet. Alongside these stories, you'll hear tales from all over the planet, from vast sand dunes, to the eerie deep sea floor. It's time to close your eyes, open your ears and subscribe so you never miss an episode. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

1 MIN2019 OCT 18
Comments
Series 3 - Trailer

Looking Up

Welcome to the final episode of the BBC Earth Podcast, Series 2. This series we've told stories about the amazing animals that live among us, and discovered the amazing technology that helps us get close to them; we've looked down on the wonder of our planet from above, and met the people who are working hard to take better care of it. For our final journey, we're looking beyond Earth, out through our thinning atmosphere to the stars and the depths of space. Make sure you're subscribed so you don't miss us, when we return for Series 3, and let us know what you think on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bbcearth/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bbcearth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/bbcearth See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

27 MIN2019 MAY 9
Comments
Looking Up
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