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The New Yorker: Politics and More

WNYC Studios and The New Yorker

595
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3.1K
Plays
The New Yorker: Politics and More

The New Yorker: Politics and More

WNYC Studios and The New Yorker

595
Followers
3.1K
Plays
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About Us

A weekly discussion about politics, hosted by The New Yorker's executive editor, Dorothy Wickenden.

Latest Episodes

A Good Week for the Climate Movement

This week, the Supreme Court rejected the Trump Administration’s request to expand construction on the Keystone XL oil pipeline, and the climate change task force formed by Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders urged politicians to "treat climate change like the emergency that it is." Bill McKibben, an activist in the environmental movement for three decades, joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss whether the United States has hit a turning point in the battle against global warming.

18 MIN1 d ago
Comments
A Good Week for the Climate Movement

Hasan Minhaj on Being His Ancestors’ Wildest Dreams

Hasan Minhaj, a comedian and political commentator, is the host of Nexflix’s “Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj.” His show—which has won both an Emmy and a Peabody—has frequently gone viral. Last year, Minhaj became a household name when he testified before Congress on the weight of student loan debt. He spoke withCarrie Battanat the 2019 New Yorker Festival about how he got invited to Washington, developing his specific brand of writing while working as a correspondent on “The Daily Show,” and how his family has helped to shape his voice as a comedian. “You don't know how long you have these shows for,” he tells Battan. “To me, if you do have that privilege, just be surgical in the way you use it.”

17 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Hasan Minhaj on Being His Ancestors’ Wildest Dreams

Keeping Released Prisoners Safe and Sane

Starting this spring, many states began releasing some inmates from prisons and jails to try to reduce the spread ofCOVID-19. But a huge number of incarcerated people are mentally ill or addicted to drugs, or sometimes both. When those people are released, they may lose their only consistent access to treatment. Marianne McCune, a reporter for WNYC, spent weeks following a psychiatrist and a social worker as they tried to locate and then help some recently released patients at a time of uncertainty and chaos. This is a collaboration between The New Yorker Radio Hour and WNYC’s “The United States of Anxiety.”

29 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Keeping Released Prisoners Safe and Sane

At the Supreme Court: A Big Day for DACA, and a Bad Day for Trump

This week, in a 5–4 decision,the Supreme Court ruled unlawfulthe Trump Administration’s decision to cancel theDACAprogram.DACAprotects from deportation some seven hundred thousand undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children. ThoughDACAand the “Dreamers” that it protects have widespread public support, the Trump Administration remains hostile to the program.Jonathan Blitzerjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discussDACA’sbig day in court, and the Trump Administration’s next moves on immigration policy.

22 MIN2 w ago
Comments
At the Supreme Court: A Big Day for DACA, and a Bad Day for Trump

Masha Gessen on Recognizing an Autocrat

In the past month, President Trump has cleared peaceful demonstrations with tear gas, told governors to “dominate” protesters, and threatened to invoke the Insurrection Act. The staff writer Masha Gessen argues that transgressions like these are signs that the President’s mind-set is fundamentally not democratic but autocratic. “Polarization and violence and high anxiety are all things that benefit an autocrat,” they warn David Remnick. Gessen’s new book, “Surviving Autocracy,” draws on their experience as a targeted journalist in Russia, and Gessen sees troubling similarities between Trump and Vladimir Putin.

15 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Masha Gessen on Recognizing an Autocrat

Arkansas Prisoners Organize Against Unchecked Racism and the Coronavirus

The Cummins Unit, a penitentiary in southeastern Arkansas, opened in 1902. Designed as a prison for black men, its rigid hierarchy and system of unpaid labor have been likened to slavery. The population at Cummins, still overwhelmingly black, has beendevastatedby thecoronavirus—the prison has the tenth-largest outbreak ofCOVID-19 in the country.Rachel Avivjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss what incarcerated men in Cummins told her about their study group, called the Think Tank; about black identity in America; how they have organized to demand adequate measures against the pandemic; and what they think about the protests following the killing ofGeorge Floyd.

19 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Arkansas Prisoners Organize Against Unchecked Racism and the Coronavirus

Running for Office During a Pandemic

The need for social distancing has upended most of the ways that candidates have traditionally put themselves before voters: gathering crowds, shaking hands, kissing babies.Eric Lachhas beenfollowingthe race in New York’s Seventeenth Congressional District to learn how Facebook Live, e-mail newsletters, and Zoombombs are shaping the race. “There’s no question that people are in pain, and they’re worried and they’re distracted,” Allison Fine, a candidate with a background in digital organizing, said. “So we’re not going to be able to break through all that noise . . . . But all the metrics of engagement are going up.”

14 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Running for Office During a Pandemic

Protests Against Police Brutality and Systemic Racism Push Trump and the G.O.P. to a Breaking Point

During Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign,mainstream Republicans expressed disgust with his divisive rhetoric, but once he became President, they fell in line behind him. The protests in the wake of the murder of George Floyd have created a moment of reckoning for the Republican Party. In recent weeks, several senators and former members of the Trump Administration have spoken out against the President, including his onetime Defense Secretary, James Mattis, who accused him of making “a mockery of our Constitution.”Susan B. Glasser, aNew Yorkerstaff writer, joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss how Trump’s response to the demonstrations is changing the dynamics of the 2020 campaign.

18 MINJUN 12
Comments
Protests Against Police Brutality and Systemic Racism Push Trump and the G.O.P. to a Breaking Point

A Former D.O.J. Official on How to Fix Policing

Ron Davis was a cop for almost thirty years, first as an officer with the Oakland P.D., then as the chief of police of East Palo Alto, California. In 2013, he joinedPresident Barack Obama's Department of Justice to direct initiatives on policing reform. He investigated the police response to the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, after the killing of Michael Brown. Davis tellsJelani Cobbthat police violence in black communities is built into the structure of policing. “I think the system is working perfectly. It is working as it was intended to work,” Davis says. “We’re still using the same systems that were designed on purpose to oppress communities of color.”

11 MINJUN 9
Comments
A Former D.O.J. Official on How to Fix Policing

The Killing of George Floyd and the Origins of American Racism

The killing of George Floydhas inspired a renewed public reckoning withAmerica’s legacy of racism. Racial prejudice is so ingrained in the origins of the country, and so pervasive in all of our institutions, that its insidious effects on all of us can be hard to grasp. The anti-racism trainer Suzanne Plihcik joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss how the concept of white racial superiority was constructed in America, and what people can do to oppose structural racism.

23 MINJUN 5
Comments
The Killing of George Floyd and the Origins of American Racism

Latest Episodes

A Good Week for the Climate Movement

This week, the Supreme Court rejected the Trump Administration’s request to expand construction on the Keystone XL oil pipeline, and the climate change task force formed by Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders urged politicians to "treat climate change like the emergency that it is." Bill McKibben, an activist in the environmental movement for three decades, joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss whether the United States has hit a turning point in the battle against global warming.

18 MIN1 d ago
Comments
A Good Week for the Climate Movement

Hasan Minhaj on Being His Ancestors’ Wildest Dreams

Hasan Minhaj, a comedian and political commentator, is the host of Nexflix’s “Patriot Act with Hasan Minhaj.” His show—which has won both an Emmy and a Peabody—has frequently gone viral. Last year, Minhaj became a household name when he testified before Congress on the weight of student loan debt. He spoke withCarrie Battanat the 2019 New Yorker Festival about how he got invited to Washington, developing his specific brand of writing while working as a correspondent on “The Daily Show,” and how his family has helped to shape his voice as a comedian. “You don't know how long you have these shows for,” he tells Battan. “To me, if you do have that privilege, just be surgical in the way you use it.”

17 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Hasan Minhaj on Being His Ancestors’ Wildest Dreams

Keeping Released Prisoners Safe and Sane

Starting this spring, many states began releasing some inmates from prisons and jails to try to reduce the spread ofCOVID-19. But a huge number of incarcerated people are mentally ill or addicted to drugs, or sometimes both. When those people are released, they may lose their only consistent access to treatment. Marianne McCune, a reporter for WNYC, spent weeks following a psychiatrist and a social worker as they tried to locate and then help some recently released patients at a time of uncertainty and chaos. This is a collaboration between The New Yorker Radio Hour and WNYC’s “The United States of Anxiety.”

29 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Keeping Released Prisoners Safe and Sane

At the Supreme Court: A Big Day for DACA, and a Bad Day for Trump

This week, in a 5–4 decision,the Supreme Court ruled unlawfulthe Trump Administration’s decision to cancel theDACAprogram.DACAprotects from deportation some seven hundred thousand undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children. ThoughDACAand the “Dreamers” that it protects have widespread public support, the Trump Administration remains hostile to the program.Jonathan Blitzerjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discussDACA’sbig day in court, and the Trump Administration’s next moves on immigration policy.

22 MIN2 w ago
Comments
At the Supreme Court: A Big Day for DACA, and a Bad Day for Trump

Masha Gessen on Recognizing an Autocrat

In the past month, President Trump has cleared peaceful demonstrations with tear gas, told governors to “dominate” protesters, and threatened to invoke the Insurrection Act. The staff writer Masha Gessen argues that transgressions like these are signs that the President’s mind-set is fundamentally not democratic but autocratic. “Polarization and violence and high anxiety are all things that benefit an autocrat,” they warn David Remnick. Gessen’s new book, “Surviving Autocracy,” draws on their experience as a targeted journalist in Russia, and Gessen sees troubling similarities between Trump and Vladimir Putin.

15 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Masha Gessen on Recognizing an Autocrat

Arkansas Prisoners Organize Against Unchecked Racism and the Coronavirus

The Cummins Unit, a penitentiary in southeastern Arkansas, opened in 1902. Designed as a prison for black men, its rigid hierarchy and system of unpaid labor have been likened to slavery. The population at Cummins, still overwhelmingly black, has beendevastatedby thecoronavirus—the prison has the tenth-largest outbreak ofCOVID-19 in the country.Rachel Avivjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss what incarcerated men in Cummins told her about their study group, called the Think Tank; about black identity in America; how they have organized to demand adequate measures against the pandemic; and what they think about the protests following the killing ofGeorge Floyd.

19 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Arkansas Prisoners Organize Against Unchecked Racism and the Coronavirus

Running for Office During a Pandemic

The need for social distancing has upended most of the ways that candidates have traditionally put themselves before voters: gathering crowds, shaking hands, kissing babies.Eric Lachhas beenfollowingthe race in New York’s Seventeenth Congressional District to learn how Facebook Live, e-mail newsletters, and Zoombombs are shaping the race. “There’s no question that people are in pain, and they’re worried and they’re distracted,” Allison Fine, a candidate with a background in digital organizing, said. “So we’re not going to be able to break through all that noise . . . . But all the metrics of engagement are going up.”

14 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Running for Office During a Pandemic

Protests Against Police Brutality and Systemic Racism Push Trump and the G.O.P. to a Breaking Point

During Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign,mainstream Republicans expressed disgust with his divisive rhetoric, but once he became President, they fell in line behind him. The protests in the wake of the murder of George Floyd have created a moment of reckoning for the Republican Party. In recent weeks, several senators and former members of the Trump Administration have spoken out against the President, including his onetime Defense Secretary, James Mattis, who accused him of making “a mockery of our Constitution.”Susan B. Glasser, aNew Yorkerstaff writer, joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss how Trump’s response to the demonstrations is changing the dynamics of the 2020 campaign.

18 MINJUN 12
Comments
Protests Against Police Brutality and Systemic Racism Push Trump and the G.O.P. to a Breaking Point

A Former D.O.J. Official on How to Fix Policing

Ron Davis was a cop for almost thirty years, first as an officer with the Oakland P.D., then as the chief of police of East Palo Alto, California. In 2013, he joinedPresident Barack Obama's Department of Justice to direct initiatives on policing reform. He investigated the police response to the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, after the killing of Michael Brown. Davis tellsJelani Cobbthat police violence in black communities is built into the structure of policing. “I think the system is working perfectly. It is working as it was intended to work,” Davis says. “We’re still using the same systems that were designed on purpose to oppress communities of color.”

11 MINJUN 9
Comments
A Former D.O.J. Official on How to Fix Policing

The Killing of George Floyd and the Origins of American Racism

The killing of George Floydhas inspired a renewed public reckoning withAmerica’s legacy of racism. Racial prejudice is so ingrained in the origins of the country, and so pervasive in all of our institutions, that its insidious effects on all of us can be hard to grasp. The anti-racism trainer Suzanne Plihcik joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss how the concept of white racial superiority was constructed in America, and what people can do to oppose structural racism.

23 MINJUN 5
Comments
The Killing of George Floyd and the Origins of American Racism
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