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The New Yorker: Politics and More

WNYC Studios and The New Yorker

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The New Yorker: Politics and More

The New Yorker: Politics and More

WNYC Studios and The New Yorker

497
Followers
2.0K
Plays
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About Us

A weekly discussion about politics, hosted by The New Yorker's executive editor, Dorothy Wickenden.

Latest Episodes

A Teen-age Trump Tries to Win His High School’s Election

Every year, Townsend Harris High School, in Queens, New York, holds a schoolwide election simulation. Students are assigned roles and begin campaigning in September. Every candidate has a staff, raises money, and makes ads for the school’s radio and television network. This fall, the school simulated the Democratic and Republican primaries.Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Joe Biden got into a rap battle. The American Family Association joined the fray and released a rap of its own. The New Yorker’sJoshua Rothmanfirst observed the simulation during the primaries of the 2016 Presidential election. At the time, he saw thatTrump’s political arrival was greeted with distaste at a school where many students come from immigrant families. “There was some stuff Donald Trump was saying that, if you heard from any other candidate, it would frankly be disgusting,” Justin, who played Pete Buttigieg this cycle, said. ButTogay, who was assigned the role of Trump—he’s a Democrat in real life—was determined to make the President more appealing to his classmates. “In preparation, I watched AlecBaldwin for a couple weeks,” he tells Rothman. For Togay and the Townsend Harris student body, Donald Trump’s unprecedented Presidency is normal. “We’ve seen what’s actually going on in Washington, because it’s been like a reality show to us,” Justin said. “This isn’t really surprising. This isn’t new.”

17 MIN13 h ago
Comments
A Teen-age Trump Tries to Win His High School’s Election

After Two Primary Contests, What’s Ahead for the Democratic Race?

On Tuesday, voters in New Hampshire cast their ballots in the Democratic Presidential primary. Followingthe debaclesurrounding the Iowa caucuses, many Democrats hoped that the results from New Hampshire wouldbring clarity tothe race.Bernie Sanderswon, arguably making him the front-runner. But close behind him was Pete Buttigieg, who also narrowly won the Iowa caucuses, andAmy Klobuchar, whose third-place finish gave her campaign renewed energy.Benjamin Wallace-WellsjoinsEric Lachto discuss the New Hampshire primaries and how a clear picture of the future of the Democratic contest remains elusive.

19 MIN4 d ago
Comments
After Two Primary Contests, What’s Ahead for the Democratic Race?

The Black Vote in 2020

The last time a Democrat won the White House, he had enormous support from black voters; lower support from black voters was one of many reasons Hillary Clinton lost in 2016. Marcus Ferrell, a political organizer from Atlanta, tells Radio Hour about the importance of turning out “unlikely voters” in order to win an election, which, for him, means black men.Jelani Cobb, aNew Yorkerstaff writer and historian, points out that the four Democratic front-runners, all of whom are white, may struggle to get the turnout they need. Cobb tells David Remnick that Joe Biden’s strong lead may begin to fall after his weak showing among largely white voters in Iowa; Pete Buttigieg has very low support among South Carolina voters, and even faces opposition from black constituents in his home town, South Bend. But Bernie Sanders, Cobb says, seems to have made inroads with at least younger black voters since 2016.

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
The Black Vote in 2020

Disasters at America’s Polling Places

On Monday, at the Iowa caucuses, a new smartphone app was used to report the results from each precinct.The appproved faulty, leading to a catastrophic failure to collect and report vote totals. In theory, advances in voting technology make voting easier and more accessible. In practice, they have introduced new vulnerabilities that can be exploited to suppress or undermine the will of the voters.Sue Halpernjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss the recent history of voter suppression and malfunctions at polling places and whether the 2020 election can be saved.

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Disasters at America’s Polling Places

Jill Lepore on Democracy in Peril, Then and Now

In the nineteen-thirties, authoritarian regimes were on the rise around the world—as they are again today—and democratic governments that came into existence after the First World War were toppling. “American democracy, too, staggered,” Jill LeporewroteinThe New Yorker, “weakened by corruption, monopoly, apathy, inequality, political violence, hucksterism, racial injustice, unemployment, even starvation.” Lepore talks with David Remnick about how Americans rallied to save democracy, and how we might apply those lessons in a new era with similar problems.

16 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Jill Lepore on Democracy in Peril, Then and Now

The Trump-Netanyahu “Deal of the Century”

On Tuesday,PresidentDonald Trumpannounced his Administration’sMiddle East peace plan. The unveiling occurred in the midst ofthe Senate impeachment trialof Trump, for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, and on the day that the Israeli Prime Minister, BenjaminNetanyahu, was indicted on charges of bribery, fraud, and breach of trust, in three cases. While nominally presenting a two-state solution, the plan heavily favors Israeli interests.Robin Wrightjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss the Trump Administration’splan in the Middle East and the dangers that Trump and Netanyahu pose to the future of democracy in their countries.

13 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The Trump-Netanyahu “Deal of the Century”

What Would a World Without Prisons Be Like?

Mass incarceration is now widely regarded as a prejudiced and deeply harmful set of policies. Bipartisan support exists for some degree of criminal-justice reform, and, in some circles, the idea of prison abolition is also gaining traction. Kai Wright, the host of the WNYC podcast “The United States of Anxiety,” spoke about the movement with Paul Butler, a law professor and former federal prosecutor who saw firsthand the damage that prosecution causes; and sujatha baliga, a MacArthur Foundation fellowwho leads the Restorative Justice Project at the nonprofit Impact Justice and a survivor of sexual violence.“Prison abolition doesn’t mean that everybody who’s locked up gets to come home tomorrow,” Butler explains.Instead, activists envision a gradual process of “decarceration,” and the creation of alternative forms of justice and harm reduction.“Abolition, to my mind, isn’t just about ending the prisons,” baliga adds. “It’s about ending binary processes which pit us as ‘...

21 MIN3 w ago
Comments
What Would a World Without Prisons Be Like?

Adam Schiff, Hakeem Jeffries, and the Framers Weigh In on Impeachment

Last week, the Senate opened theimpeachment trialofDonald Trump. With Republicansstanding immovablyby the President, the trial is expected to result in Trump’s acquittal. The Framers of the Constitution issued dire warnings about the spectre of “factionalism” and how it could endanger American democracy.Jelani Cobbjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss the origins of partisanship in American politics and how it’s playing out in arguments about whether the President should be removed from office.

20 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Adam Schiff, Hakeem Jeffries, and the Framers Weigh In on Impeachment

Ten Years After “The New Jim Crow”

The United States has the largest prison population in the world. But, until the publication of Michelle Alexander’s book “The New Jim Crow,” in 2010, most people didn’t use the term mass incarceration, or consider the practice a social-justice issue. Alexander argued that the increasing imprisonment of black and brown men—through rising arrest rates and longer sentences—was not merely a response to crime but a system of racial control. “The drug war was in part a politically motivated strategy, a backlash to the civil-rights movement, but it was also a reflection of conscious and unconscious biases fuelled by media portrayals of drug users,” Alexander tellsDavid Remnick. “Those racial stereotypes were resonant of the same stereotypes of slaves and folks during the Jim Crow era.”

13 MINJAN 21
Comments
Ten Years After “The New Jim Crow”

As the Impeachment Trial Begins, the Democratic Candidates Struggle to Forcefully Take on President Trump

This week, Democratic Presidential candidates met for theirfinal debatebefore the Iowa caucuses, a few weeks after Trump ordered the targeted killing of the Iranian military commanderQassam Suleimani. They talked about how America’s role in the world is threatened by the President’s erratic—and, in the case of Ukraine, likely criminal—approach to foreign policy. But many voters remain skeptical that Trump can be beaten.Susan B. Glasserjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss the radical uncertainties of the 2020 race.

20 MINJAN 17
Comments
As the Impeachment Trial Begins, the Democratic Candidates Struggle to Forcefully Take on President Trump

Latest Episodes

A Teen-age Trump Tries to Win His High School’s Election

Every year, Townsend Harris High School, in Queens, New York, holds a schoolwide election simulation. Students are assigned roles and begin campaigning in September. Every candidate has a staff, raises money, and makes ads for the school’s radio and television network. This fall, the school simulated the Democratic and Republican primaries.Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Joe Biden got into a rap battle. The American Family Association joined the fray and released a rap of its own. The New Yorker’sJoshua Rothmanfirst observed the simulation during the primaries of the 2016 Presidential election. At the time, he saw thatTrump’s political arrival was greeted with distaste at a school where many students come from immigrant families. “There was some stuff Donald Trump was saying that, if you heard from any other candidate, it would frankly be disgusting,” Justin, who played Pete Buttigieg this cycle, said. ButTogay, who was assigned the role of Trump—he’s a Democrat in real life—was determined to make the President more appealing to his classmates. “In preparation, I watched AlecBaldwin for a couple weeks,” he tells Rothman. For Togay and the Townsend Harris student body, Donald Trump’s unprecedented Presidency is normal. “We’ve seen what’s actually going on in Washington, because it’s been like a reality show to us,” Justin said. “This isn’t really surprising. This isn’t new.”

17 MIN13 h ago
Comments
A Teen-age Trump Tries to Win His High School’s Election

After Two Primary Contests, What’s Ahead for the Democratic Race?

On Tuesday, voters in New Hampshire cast their ballots in the Democratic Presidential primary. Followingthe debaclesurrounding the Iowa caucuses, many Democrats hoped that the results from New Hampshire wouldbring clarity tothe race.Bernie Sanderswon, arguably making him the front-runner. But close behind him was Pete Buttigieg, who also narrowly won the Iowa caucuses, andAmy Klobuchar, whose third-place finish gave her campaign renewed energy.Benjamin Wallace-WellsjoinsEric Lachto discuss the New Hampshire primaries and how a clear picture of the future of the Democratic contest remains elusive.

19 MIN4 d ago
Comments
After Two Primary Contests, What’s Ahead for the Democratic Race?

The Black Vote in 2020

The last time a Democrat won the White House, he had enormous support from black voters; lower support from black voters was one of many reasons Hillary Clinton lost in 2016. Marcus Ferrell, a political organizer from Atlanta, tells Radio Hour about the importance of turning out “unlikely voters” in order to win an election, which, for him, means black men.Jelani Cobb, aNew Yorkerstaff writer and historian, points out that the four Democratic front-runners, all of whom are white, may struggle to get the turnout they need. Cobb tells David Remnick that Joe Biden’s strong lead may begin to fall after his weak showing among largely white voters in Iowa; Pete Buttigieg has very low support among South Carolina voters, and even faces opposition from black constituents in his home town, South Bend. But Bernie Sanders, Cobb says, seems to have made inroads with at least younger black voters since 2016.

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
The Black Vote in 2020

Disasters at America’s Polling Places

On Monday, at the Iowa caucuses, a new smartphone app was used to report the results from each precinct.The appproved faulty, leading to a catastrophic failure to collect and report vote totals. In theory, advances in voting technology make voting easier and more accessible. In practice, they have introduced new vulnerabilities that can be exploited to suppress or undermine the will of the voters.Sue Halpernjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss the recent history of voter suppression and malfunctions at polling places and whether the 2020 election can be saved.

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Disasters at America’s Polling Places

Jill Lepore on Democracy in Peril, Then and Now

In the nineteen-thirties, authoritarian regimes were on the rise around the world—as they are again today—and democratic governments that came into existence after the First World War were toppling. “American democracy, too, staggered,” Jill LeporewroteinThe New Yorker, “weakened by corruption, monopoly, apathy, inequality, political violence, hucksterism, racial injustice, unemployment, even starvation.” Lepore talks with David Remnick about how Americans rallied to save democracy, and how we might apply those lessons in a new era with similar problems.

16 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Jill Lepore on Democracy in Peril, Then and Now

The Trump-Netanyahu “Deal of the Century”

On Tuesday,PresidentDonald Trumpannounced his Administration’sMiddle East peace plan. The unveiling occurred in the midst ofthe Senate impeachment trialof Trump, for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, and on the day that the Israeli Prime Minister, BenjaminNetanyahu, was indicted on charges of bribery, fraud, and breach of trust, in three cases. While nominally presenting a two-state solution, the plan heavily favors Israeli interests.Robin Wrightjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss the Trump Administration’splan in the Middle East and the dangers that Trump and Netanyahu pose to the future of democracy in their countries.

13 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The Trump-Netanyahu “Deal of the Century”

What Would a World Without Prisons Be Like?

Mass incarceration is now widely regarded as a prejudiced and deeply harmful set of policies. Bipartisan support exists for some degree of criminal-justice reform, and, in some circles, the idea of prison abolition is also gaining traction. Kai Wright, the host of the WNYC podcast “The United States of Anxiety,” spoke about the movement with Paul Butler, a law professor and former federal prosecutor who saw firsthand the damage that prosecution causes; and sujatha baliga, a MacArthur Foundation fellowwho leads the Restorative Justice Project at the nonprofit Impact Justice and a survivor of sexual violence.“Prison abolition doesn’t mean that everybody who’s locked up gets to come home tomorrow,” Butler explains.Instead, activists envision a gradual process of “decarceration,” and the creation of alternative forms of justice and harm reduction.“Abolition, to my mind, isn’t just about ending the prisons,” baliga adds. “It’s about ending binary processes which pit us as ‘...

21 MIN3 w ago
Comments
What Would a World Without Prisons Be Like?

Adam Schiff, Hakeem Jeffries, and the Framers Weigh In on Impeachment

Last week, the Senate opened theimpeachment trialofDonald Trump. With Republicansstanding immovablyby the President, the trial is expected to result in Trump’s acquittal. The Framers of the Constitution issued dire warnings about the spectre of “factionalism” and how it could endanger American democracy.Jelani Cobbjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss the origins of partisanship in American politics and how it’s playing out in arguments about whether the President should be removed from office.

20 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Adam Schiff, Hakeem Jeffries, and the Framers Weigh In on Impeachment

Ten Years After “The New Jim Crow”

The United States has the largest prison population in the world. But, until the publication of Michelle Alexander’s book “The New Jim Crow,” in 2010, most people didn’t use the term mass incarceration, or consider the practice a social-justice issue. Alexander argued that the increasing imprisonment of black and brown men—through rising arrest rates and longer sentences—was not merely a response to crime but a system of racial control. “The drug war was in part a politically motivated strategy, a backlash to the civil-rights movement, but it was also a reflection of conscious and unconscious biases fuelled by media portrayals of drug users,” Alexander tellsDavid Remnick. “Those racial stereotypes were resonant of the same stereotypes of slaves and folks during the Jim Crow era.”

13 MINJAN 21
Comments
Ten Years After “The New Jim Crow”

As the Impeachment Trial Begins, the Democratic Candidates Struggle to Forcefully Take on President Trump

This week, Democratic Presidential candidates met for theirfinal debatebefore the Iowa caucuses, a few weeks after Trump ordered the targeted killing of the Iranian military commanderQassam Suleimani. They talked about how America’s role in the world is threatened by the President’s erratic—and, in the case of Ukraine, likely criminal—approach to foreign policy. But many voters remain skeptical that Trump can be beaten.Susan B. Glasserjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss the radical uncertainties of the 2020 race.

20 MINJAN 17
Comments
As the Impeachment Trial Begins, the Democratic Candidates Struggle to Forcefully Take on President Trump
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