Himalaya: Listen. Learn. Grow.

4.8K Ratings
Open In App
title

CITIUS MAG Podcast with Chris Chavez

CITIUS MAG Podcast With Chris Chavez

8
Followers
12
Plays
CITIUS MAG Podcast with Chris Chavez

CITIUS MAG Podcast with Chris Chavez

CITIUS MAG Podcast With Chris Chavez

8
Followers
12
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

A weekly podcast from CITIUSMAG.com hosted by Chris Chavez. Interviewing the stars of track and field every week. Whether it's athletes, coaches, agents, writers or other interesting figures from running culture, we sit down for a laid back chat on the latest happenings in the sport. Be sure to check out CITIUSMAG.com for all your latest running commentary.Support the show and rep CITIUS MAG: https://www.bonfire.com/store/citius-mag/▶ Follow us:twitter.com/CitiusMaginstagram.com/citiusmagfacebook.com/citiusmag

Latest Episodes

District Track Club's Edose Ibadin: Where Your Story Starts Isn’t Where It Ends

“With track it’s definitely a lot different than your basketball and football. With track, you’re always going to be able to compete against those mid-major schools and Power 5 schools no matter what school you’re at. For example, North Carolina A&T is an HBCU and they’re doing phenomenally well in the NCAA. Seeing that is going to get a lot of kids to want to go to those school. Seeing some of the alums that came from HBCUs like Kellie Wells or Francena McCorory is going to draw other athletes to HBCUs as well. You can say, ‘Oh if I go to an HBCU and make an Olympic team, I can still achieve my Olympic dream all while still being among the Black community.’ I think conversations like that are being had and a lot of people are considering HBCUs now more than ever. In the track world, it was always kind of popular to go to HBCUs but now it’s more than ever it’s definitely a thing.” Edose Ibadin a pro runner with the District Track Club in Washington D.C. I decided to get him on the show after he went viral over the weekend with a cool tweet that said: “Dang I really ran 1:44 on Friday. This the same guy who never made an NCAA final. Only made NCAA in the 800 one time. Only had one scholarship offer out of high school. Wasn’t All-American in HS. Where your story starts isn’t where it ends” That’s just awesome. I wanted to know a little bit more to his story and how he’s gotten to this point, plus what it was like to run at a HBCU. Follow Edose on Instagram – @eibadin FULL SHOW NOTES ON CITIUSMAG.COM Catch the latest episode of thepodcast on iTunes so subscribe and leave a five-star review.We are also onStitcher,Google PlayandSpotify! Support for this episode comes from GOODR SUNGLASSES–I’ve been rocking Goodr sunglasses throughout the past couple of months. No slip. No bounce. No fog. Polarized. Ridiculously affordable starting at $25 a pair. They’re already the most affordable performance shades on the planet. | Visit GOODR.COM/CITIUS to check out some of my favorite pairs. Follow us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook ✩ Connect with Chris via Email: chris@citiusmag.com | Twitter | Instagram

39 MIN4 d ago
Comments
District Track Club's Edose Ibadin: Where Your Story Starts Isn’t Where It Ends

Ciaran O'Lionaird And The Not Dead Yet Comeback Tour

“At the end of the day, I stepped away and I took on this mindset of ‘I’m not just a runner’ and I wanted to do other shit whether it was in work or outside of work. I wanted to distance myself from this world. The biggest thing I’ve learned from meeting people away from the sport and having experiences removed from the sport of running is that I am a runner at my core and it’s OK to admit that running is something really special. To be able to call yourself a runner is amazing. To be able to have the chance to do it at a high level – maybe even do it as your job or represent your country – besides it being something you love so much and naturally have a disposition for is a gift that maybe you shouldn’t throw away. I learned that being away from the sport. When I was in the sport, I was super frustrated like ‘Fuck this. I’m hurt all the time. This is bullshit.’ The time where I “treated my body to death” any epiphanies that I might have had have pulled me back into th...

71 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Ciaran O'Lionaird And The Not Dead Yet Comeback Tour

Sam Chelanga On Going With The Wind And Finding Victory Within For His Career And Life

“What I know is the aspect of being looked at differently because of our national heritage – in this case as Kenyan athletes who also happen to be Black in the United States of America. It’s real...One of the things that bothered me many times was that I would go and run a race and if it was a United States championship, they would say ‘Kenyan-born Sam Chelanga.’ What do you get by that? You get to tell people this is the real champion and this is not the real champion because he is Kenyan-born. My performance and my hard work go through the window.” Lots of people know of Sam from his success as a three-time NCAA cross country champion out of Liberty. He set the NCAA 10,000 meter record of 27:08.49 in the same race that Chris Solinsky broke 27 to set the American record. Those accomplishments came before he became an American citizen in 2015. It was something he wanted for a while and patiently waited out the process until it became official. As a professional, he had some su...

63 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Sam Chelanga On Going With The Wind And Finding Victory Within For His Career And Life

Chanelle Price On Her Comeback And Not Walking Away From The Sport With Regrets

"JJ (Clark) helped me realize: 'You have to let high school go. This is a new chapter. It's a new environment. You're away from home. Your body is changing. There's a lot going on. Everything you achieved in the past four years was amazing.' He didn't want to take that away from me but he said, 'Let's start over.' That's what a lot of high school phenoms do. It's natural. You carry what you've achieved into college but my biggest advice would be to embrace this new chapter and know that it's completely different. Everybody is good. Everybody is a state champ. Find a coach that cares about you more than just a runner and athlete – someone who wants to walk this new journey with you. Because it is going to be a journey and there will be highs and lows. You can't do it alone. You're young and so you need that support from someone older and wiser who is going to be patient with you. There will be breakthroughs but give your body time. I wish I would have known that as 17-year-old Chane...

60 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Chanelle Price On Her Comeback And Not Walking Away From The Sport With Regrets

Elise Cranny On How She Went From Injured To 14:48 for No. 7 U.S. All-Time for 5,000m, Patience As A High School Star, Re-Living Stanford Success

On July 1, Elise Cranny ran 14:48.02 to become the 7th fastest American woman in history for the 5,000 meters. The race was run in Portland, Oregon in front of no fans and just against her teammates. The time counts toward the all-time lists because USATF recently announced they will be counting times and marks set at USATF sanctioned events from April to November toward next year's U.S. Indoor Championships and Olympic Trials. This is arguably her biggest performance as a pro but was also very accomplished as a high school star out of Niwot High School in Colorado and then a 12-time All-American at Stanford. In this episode, we run through her start in sport with influence from her parents who were avid triathletes. We touch on the pressure of being a high school star and a patient transition into college training and development. Elise takes us through some of the biggest races of her college career including her runner up finish at the 2017 NCAA outdoor championships 1500 where s...

76 MINJUL 8
Comments
Elise Cranny On How She Went From Injured To 14:48 for No. 7 U.S. All-Time for 5,000m, Patience As A High School Star, Re-Living Stanford Success

Duane Solomon's Exit Interview: Retires As Third-Fastest U.S. 800m Runner, Inside the London 2012 Final & The Next Gen of The Event

Duane Solomon joins the CITIUS MAG Podcast for an exit interview after announcing his retirement on June 20th with an Instagram post. He finished his career as the third-fastest American of all-time in the 800 meters with his 1:42.82 personal best at the 2012 Olympics in London. In this episode, we'll go all the way to his high school career and how he managed to find the 800 meters as his specialty event. We'll look at how his "old school" approach to training started in college at USC and eventually landed him on his first U.S. national team in 2007 in Osaka. He opens up about issues with confidence at the college level and early into his professional career before he eventually erupted in 2012 under the guidance of Johny Gray (the former American record holder). Duane explains why it's the 2012 Olympic Trials and not the Olympic final that's the proudest moment of his career. From the warmup area to the call room to the track and off, Duane details his perspective of the London f...

89 MINJUN 30
Comments
Duane Solomon's Exit Interview: Retires As Third-Fastest U.S. 800m Runner, Inside the London 2012 Final & The Next Gen of The Event

Races Return & Controversy As Well - Nature Is Healing

Chris Chavez and Matt Meyer reunite to unpack the biggest stories in track and field for May and mid-June. Some races have returned on a small scale with the Impossible Games in Oslo, Norway. We discuss that meet and some of the rumored plans for track to take place in the United States in August. Other topics discussed on this episode include: Jakob Ingebrigtsen is on fire; Johnny Gregorek broke the Blue Jean Mile World Record, Leo Daschbach becomes the 11th high school boy to break four minutes for the mile, The Diamond League has revised its calendar for 2020 with 11 meets starting in August and running through October; Salwa Eid Nasser and Christian Coleman were provisionally suspended by the Athletics Integrity Unit for whereabouts failures. All that and more on the latest episode. This episode is Part II to our monthly show. In Part I, we had a conversation about race and sport with Richard Issa of Issa Run Crew in Philadelphia. You can listen to that conversation here: https:...

41 MINJUN 23
Comments
Races Return & Controversy As Well - Nature Is Healing

Richard Issa Has Hope For The Running Community As We Heal

As we continue our discussion about race and sport, Matt Meyer decided to bring on our friend Richard Issa Bockari. He heads the Issa Run Crew in Philadelphia. He shares his experiences in the running community from the perspective as a Black runner in the middle of the pack and among the amateurs – where it is very often white. On Global Running Day, he invited a few members from his run crew to join him in a protest run but instead, they marched and then took a knee in the middle of a Philadelphia intersection for a moment of silence that lasted nine minutes. In this episode, he discusses the conversations he's having with members of his running community, questions people should be asking themselves and how we can all be allies in the Black Lives Matter movement. Follow Richard on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/richardissa/ He gave his phone number on the podcast so if you want to talk to him, call or text him at (609) 902-7354 Support for this episode comes from GOODR SUN...

74 MINJUN 20
Comments
Richard Issa Has Hope For The Running Community As We Heal

Gwen Berry Will Not Be Silenced, Protesting Racial Inequality in 2019 and Finally Being Understood

“Take accountability. We are tired of educating you. We are tired of getting racially profiled and getting racially discriminated against. We're tired of being killed. We can't do both. White people have to take the burden...Help us because we can't do it by ourselves." Last year, Gwen Berry raised her first on the podium of the Pan American Games after winning the gold medal in the hammer throw. Her protest against racial and social injustice in America landed her a 12-month probation from the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee. After nationwide protests broke out at the end of May, I caught up with Gwen for a Sports Illustrated interview in which she said she would do it again in 2021 once her probation is up. On social media, she demanded an apology from USOPC CEO Sarah Hershland after they released a statement saying the USOPC stands "stands with those who demand equality." They had a phone call where Hirshland apologized for the effects of the decision to put Berry on proba...

38 MINJUN 17
Comments
Gwen Berry Will Not Be Silenced, Protesting Racial Inequality in 2019 and Finally Being Understood

Russell Dinkins Wants to Save Brown Track And Field, Examining Racial Injustice in Sport

"Here’s the thing: For a kid who plays squash in Connecticut, it doesn’t matter if they go to Brown, Princeton or Harvard. They can go to some other school and they’re likely going to be OK. Their families have money. They have connections. They’re going to be alright. They’re going to go to college. A kid who ran really fast and ran a really great 1,500 at their small state meet or their local city conference, gets a call from somebody – they have a life-changing opportunity. They have an opportunity to change their future in a way that otherwise would not have been possible. Why am I going to sit back and let that happen? I’m not so that’s why I wrote the article." On May 28, Brown University announced its decision to cut 11 varsity sports as part of their Excellence in Brown Athletics Initiative. The teams that were cut were men's and women’s fencing, men's and women’s golf, women’s skiing, men's and women’s squash, women’s equestrian, and men’s track, field, and cr...

81 MINJUN 9
Comments
Russell Dinkins Wants to Save Brown Track And Field, Examining Racial Injustice in Sport

Latest Episodes

District Track Club's Edose Ibadin: Where Your Story Starts Isn’t Where It Ends

“With track it’s definitely a lot different than your basketball and football. With track, you’re always going to be able to compete against those mid-major schools and Power 5 schools no matter what school you’re at. For example, North Carolina A&T is an HBCU and they’re doing phenomenally well in the NCAA. Seeing that is going to get a lot of kids to want to go to those school. Seeing some of the alums that came from HBCUs like Kellie Wells or Francena McCorory is going to draw other athletes to HBCUs as well. You can say, ‘Oh if I go to an HBCU and make an Olympic team, I can still achieve my Olympic dream all while still being among the Black community.’ I think conversations like that are being had and a lot of people are considering HBCUs now more than ever. In the track world, it was always kind of popular to go to HBCUs but now it’s more than ever it’s definitely a thing.” Edose Ibadin a pro runner with the District Track Club in Washington D.C. I decided to get him on the show after he went viral over the weekend with a cool tweet that said: “Dang I really ran 1:44 on Friday. This the same guy who never made an NCAA final. Only made NCAA in the 800 one time. Only had one scholarship offer out of high school. Wasn’t All-American in HS. Where your story starts isn’t where it ends” That’s just awesome. I wanted to know a little bit more to his story and how he’s gotten to this point, plus what it was like to run at a HBCU. Follow Edose on Instagram – @eibadin FULL SHOW NOTES ON CITIUSMAG.COM Catch the latest episode of thepodcast on iTunes so subscribe and leave a five-star review.We are also onStitcher,Google PlayandSpotify! Support for this episode comes from GOODR SUNGLASSES–I’ve been rocking Goodr sunglasses throughout the past couple of months. No slip. No bounce. No fog. Polarized. Ridiculously affordable starting at $25 a pair. They’re already the most affordable performance shades on the planet. | Visit GOODR.COM/CITIUS to check out some of my favorite pairs. Follow us: Twitter | Instagram | Facebook ✩ Connect with Chris via Email: chris@citiusmag.com | Twitter | Instagram

39 MIN4 d ago
Comments
District Track Club's Edose Ibadin: Where Your Story Starts Isn’t Where It Ends

Ciaran O'Lionaird And The Not Dead Yet Comeback Tour

“At the end of the day, I stepped away and I took on this mindset of ‘I’m not just a runner’ and I wanted to do other shit whether it was in work or outside of work. I wanted to distance myself from this world. The biggest thing I’ve learned from meeting people away from the sport and having experiences removed from the sport of running is that I am a runner at my core and it’s OK to admit that running is something really special. To be able to call yourself a runner is amazing. To be able to have the chance to do it at a high level – maybe even do it as your job or represent your country – besides it being something you love so much and naturally have a disposition for is a gift that maybe you shouldn’t throw away. I learned that being away from the sport. When I was in the sport, I was super frustrated like ‘Fuck this. I’m hurt all the time. This is bullshit.’ The time where I “treated my body to death” any epiphanies that I might have had have pulled me back into th...

71 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Ciaran O'Lionaird And The Not Dead Yet Comeback Tour

Sam Chelanga On Going With The Wind And Finding Victory Within For His Career And Life

“What I know is the aspect of being looked at differently because of our national heritage – in this case as Kenyan athletes who also happen to be Black in the United States of America. It’s real...One of the things that bothered me many times was that I would go and run a race and if it was a United States championship, they would say ‘Kenyan-born Sam Chelanga.’ What do you get by that? You get to tell people this is the real champion and this is not the real champion because he is Kenyan-born. My performance and my hard work go through the window.” Lots of people know of Sam from his success as a three-time NCAA cross country champion out of Liberty. He set the NCAA 10,000 meter record of 27:08.49 in the same race that Chris Solinsky broke 27 to set the American record. Those accomplishments came before he became an American citizen in 2015. It was something he wanted for a while and patiently waited out the process until it became official. As a professional, he had some su...

63 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Sam Chelanga On Going With The Wind And Finding Victory Within For His Career And Life

Chanelle Price On Her Comeback And Not Walking Away From The Sport With Regrets

"JJ (Clark) helped me realize: 'You have to let high school go. This is a new chapter. It's a new environment. You're away from home. Your body is changing. There's a lot going on. Everything you achieved in the past four years was amazing.' He didn't want to take that away from me but he said, 'Let's start over.' That's what a lot of high school phenoms do. It's natural. You carry what you've achieved into college but my biggest advice would be to embrace this new chapter and know that it's completely different. Everybody is good. Everybody is a state champ. Find a coach that cares about you more than just a runner and athlete – someone who wants to walk this new journey with you. Because it is going to be a journey and there will be highs and lows. You can't do it alone. You're young and so you need that support from someone older and wiser who is going to be patient with you. There will be breakthroughs but give your body time. I wish I would have known that as 17-year-old Chane...

60 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Chanelle Price On Her Comeback And Not Walking Away From The Sport With Regrets

Elise Cranny On How She Went From Injured To 14:48 for No. 7 U.S. All-Time for 5,000m, Patience As A High School Star, Re-Living Stanford Success

On July 1, Elise Cranny ran 14:48.02 to become the 7th fastest American woman in history for the 5,000 meters. The race was run in Portland, Oregon in front of no fans and just against her teammates. The time counts toward the all-time lists because USATF recently announced they will be counting times and marks set at USATF sanctioned events from April to November toward next year's U.S. Indoor Championships and Olympic Trials. This is arguably her biggest performance as a pro but was also very accomplished as a high school star out of Niwot High School in Colorado and then a 12-time All-American at Stanford. In this episode, we run through her start in sport with influence from her parents who were avid triathletes. We touch on the pressure of being a high school star and a patient transition into college training and development. Elise takes us through some of the biggest races of her college career including her runner up finish at the 2017 NCAA outdoor championships 1500 where s...

76 MINJUL 8
Comments
Elise Cranny On How She Went From Injured To 14:48 for No. 7 U.S. All-Time for 5,000m, Patience As A High School Star, Re-Living Stanford Success

Duane Solomon's Exit Interview: Retires As Third-Fastest U.S. 800m Runner, Inside the London 2012 Final & The Next Gen of The Event

Duane Solomon joins the CITIUS MAG Podcast for an exit interview after announcing his retirement on June 20th with an Instagram post. He finished his career as the third-fastest American of all-time in the 800 meters with his 1:42.82 personal best at the 2012 Olympics in London. In this episode, we'll go all the way to his high school career and how he managed to find the 800 meters as his specialty event. We'll look at how his "old school" approach to training started in college at USC and eventually landed him on his first U.S. national team in 2007 in Osaka. He opens up about issues with confidence at the college level and early into his professional career before he eventually erupted in 2012 under the guidance of Johny Gray (the former American record holder). Duane explains why it's the 2012 Olympic Trials and not the Olympic final that's the proudest moment of his career. From the warmup area to the call room to the track and off, Duane details his perspective of the London f...

89 MINJUN 30
Comments
Duane Solomon's Exit Interview: Retires As Third-Fastest U.S. 800m Runner, Inside the London 2012 Final & The Next Gen of The Event

Races Return & Controversy As Well - Nature Is Healing

Chris Chavez and Matt Meyer reunite to unpack the biggest stories in track and field for May and mid-June. Some races have returned on a small scale with the Impossible Games in Oslo, Norway. We discuss that meet and some of the rumored plans for track to take place in the United States in August. Other topics discussed on this episode include: Jakob Ingebrigtsen is on fire; Johnny Gregorek broke the Blue Jean Mile World Record, Leo Daschbach becomes the 11th high school boy to break four minutes for the mile, The Diamond League has revised its calendar for 2020 with 11 meets starting in August and running through October; Salwa Eid Nasser and Christian Coleman were provisionally suspended by the Athletics Integrity Unit for whereabouts failures. All that and more on the latest episode. This episode is Part II to our monthly show. In Part I, we had a conversation about race and sport with Richard Issa of Issa Run Crew in Philadelphia. You can listen to that conversation here: https:...

41 MINJUN 23
Comments
Races Return & Controversy As Well - Nature Is Healing

Richard Issa Has Hope For The Running Community As We Heal

As we continue our discussion about race and sport, Matt Meyer decided to bring on our friend Richard Issa Bockari. He heads the Issa Run Crew in Philadelphia. He shares his experiences in the running community from the perspective as a Black runner in the middle of the pack and among the amateurs – where it is very often white. On Global Running Day, he invited a few members from his run crew to join him in a protest run but instead, they marched and then took a knee in the middle of a Philadelphia intersection for a moment of silence that lasted nine minutes. In this episode, he discusses the conversations he's having with members of his running community, questions people should be asking themselves and how we can all be allies in the Black Lives Matter movement. Follow Richard on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/richardissa/ He gave his phone number on the podcast so if you want to talk to him, call or text him at (609) 902-7354 Support for this episode comes from GOODR SUN...

74 MINJUN 20
Comments
Richard Issa Has Hope For The Running Community As We Heal

Gwen Berry Will Not Be Silenced, Protesting Racial Inequality in 2019 and Finally Being Understood

“Take accountability. We are tired of educating you. We are tired of getting racially profiled and getting racially discriminated against. We're tired of being killed. We can't do both. White people have to take the burden...Help us because we can't do it by ourselves." Last year, Gwen Berry raised her first on the podium of the Pan American Games after winning the gold medal in the hammer throw. Her protest against racial and social injustice in America landed her a 12-month probation from the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee. After nationwide protests broke out at the end of May, I caught up with Gwen for a Sports Illustrated interview in which she said she would do it again in 2021 once her probation is up. On social media, she demanded an apology from USOPC CEO Sarah Hershland after they released a statement saying the USOPC stands "stands with those who demand equality." They had a phone call where Hirshland apologized for the effects of the decision to put Berry on proba...

38 MINJUN 17
Comments
Gwen Berry Will Not Be Silenced, Protesting Racial Inequality in 2019 and Finally Being Understood

Russell Dinkins Wants to Save Brown Track And Field, Examining Racial Injustice in Sport

"Here’s the thing: For a kid who plays squash in Connecticut, it doesn’t matter if they go to Brown, Princeton or Harvard. They can go to some other school and they’re likely going to be OK. Their families have money. They have connections. They’re going to be alright. They’re going to go to college. A kid who ran really fast and ran a really great 1,500 at their small state meet or their local city conference, gets a call from somebody – they have a life-changing opportunity. They have an opportunity to change their future in a way that otherwise would not have been possible. Why am I going to sit back and let that happen? I’m not so that’s why I wrote the article." On May 28, Brown University announced its decision to cut 11 varsity sports as part of their Excellence in Brown Athletics Initiative. The teams that were cut were men's and women’s fencing, men's and women’s golf, women’s skiing, men's and women’s squash, women’s equestrian, and men’s track, field, and cr...

81 MINJUN 9
Comments
Russell Dinkins Wants to Save Brown Track And Field, Examining Racial Injustice in Sport
hmly
Welcome to Himalaya LearningDozens of podcourses featuring over 100 experts are waiting for you.