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More Than Running with Dana Giordano

CITIUS MAG

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More Than Running with Dana Giordano

More Than Running with Dana Giordano

CITIUS MAG

1
Followers
3
Plays
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About Us

Listen as Dana Giordano, a professional middle-distance runner for the Boston Athletic Association, sits down and talks with some of the most inspirational and insightful women in running. Whether they're doing amazing things on the track or working tirelessly to promote the sport as industry leaders and entrepreneurs, hear how they've found success.Connect with Dana on Instagram: https://instagram.com/dana_gio

Latest Episodes

Episode 11 | Heather MacLean, New Balance Boston

We love to hear about the stories of athletes who always wanted to be Olympians since they were young but what about athletes who took a more circuitous route to success in the sport? If you told Heather MacLean in high school that she would be running professionally and ranked in the top 40 in the world she would have looked at you with three heads. Heather started running track at Peabody because her friend who drove her after school ride to work at a local grocery storewas also doing track. The first in her family to graduate from college from UMass Amherst, Heather's story is one of resilience, drive, and grit. As an NCAA Woman of the Year nominee and cross country All-American, Heather’s collegiate success fell mostly under the radar of the general public. In 2019, Heather had a breakthrough year training in Boston under Mark Coogan with Team New Balance Boston and ran a massive PR in the 1500m of 4:05 and placing 7th at USAs. In a single season, Heather dropped 9 seconds from...

79 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Episode 11 | Heather MacLean, New Balance Boston

Episode 10 | Natalia Petrzela, Ph.D. – New School Associate Professor of History, Marathoner

“I am definitely not the first person to write about the history of fitness but I will say I think I am one of the first people who is connecting fitness culture in America to bigger political and cultural questions and doing so in a kind of popular way...I draw on the work of amazing scholars who have been working on fitness and physical culture but their work has been more within the academy. That’s a real privilege to be doing real research and to help amplify the work of people who have come before. As to why people haven’t thought about this as a meaningful and historical topic, it’s interesting. A lot of times, there’s this irony that our nation is obsessed with fitness. It’s being pushed on us all the time. ‘Work out!’ ‘Buy this machine!’ ‘Join this gym!’ At the same time, we’re one of the least fit nations out there. The question that animates my research is: How did we become a country obsessed with exercise? That is a really new thing. But also, why are we not...

50 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Episode 10 | Natalia Petrzela, Ph.D. – New School Associate Professor of History, Marathoner

Episode 9 | Erin Kenney of Nutrition • Rewired

"I remember going through a pretty awful breakup and just mentally wasn't in a great place. Not knowing much about nutrition, I thought that I wanted to be a better athlete and I had this newfound sense of motivation. What ended up happening was developing this sense of putting a lot of pressure on myself. I just started doing Google searches like people do all the time. It was 'How to be a better athlete?' or 'How to be stronger?' or 'How to be leaner?' And what do you think the results are that came upas ? There are different fad diets, cutting out carbohydrates, only eat this or don't eat that or fruit. Gosh, I must have tried everything. I remember being so depleted at the end of some days. I thought, 'OK. This is just how it's supposed to be. They said this would happen. Just keep eating more protein or do things like that.' There was a point that I got to where I determined, 'This is not sustainable. My performance is now suffering. My mental health is suffering.' That's when I started learning actually and truly what nutrition means." Erin Kenney is a registered dietitian out of Boston who specializes in gastrointestinal disorders, sports nutrition, medicinal cannabis use. The reason I wanted Erin on this podcast was because I thought that she would be super helpful in navigating many relevant topics about fueling by runners. A little bit over a year ago, I reached out to Erin to get some of her advice on how I should be approaching things as a professional athlete. She is also the author of 'Rewire Your Gut' and hosts her own Nutrition Rewired podcast. Follow Erin on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/nutritionrewired/ Check out her website here: https://www.nutritionrewired.com/ Follow Dana: https://twitter.com/dana_gio6 https://www.instagram.com/dana_gio/ Follow us: twitter.com/CitiusMag instagram.com/citiusmag facebook.com/citiusmag

64 MINJUL 7
Comments
Episode 9 | Erin Kenney of Nutrition • Rewired

Episode 8 | Nia Akins, Brooks Beast and University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing Grad

"I definitely felt very different from everyone else and that's definitely, to be honest, a huge reason why I don't really like cross country as much as track. I do feel like there are less people I can relate to or I can even talk to some people about some things I'm experiencing or feeling. I know when I was being recruited at Penn, there was a specific middle distance group that was a mix between 400-800-milers. Those people didn't necessarily run cross country. I was excited about coming into a group like that. When the coaches changed a bit, now I was a distance runner. I was running cross country and I was the only individual of color. I think that was a very different experience. To anyone who is listening, who is one of very few or maybe the only person of color on their team, you're supposed to be in that space. Just being in that space is doing a lot for not only you but the Black community at large. You're immersing people in your experiences and perspectives, even if you're not saying that much or anything about being Black. It's felt by everybody. Your presence is definitely felt and you're making an impact by doing that. I've had some really great people in my circle outside of just my immediate training group that did a good job of telling me, "You're supposed to be here. You can do well here." I think that helped me have that degree of success that I had in cross country and prepared me well for track." ------ Nia Akins joins Dana Giordano just days after signing a professional contract to run for the Brooks Beasts training group in Seattle, Washington. She just wrapped up an accomplished career at the University of Pennsylvania, where she was a two-time NCAA runner-up in the 800 meters and boasts a 2:00.71 indoor personal best in the event. She also graduated with a degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. In this episode, they discuss her decision to turn pro amid a global pandemic, the accomplished final goals wiped away due to COVID-19, balancing her coursework at the No. 1 nursing school in the country, her conversations regarding the Black Lives Matter movement and what her hope is for society and sport moving forward. In May, she opened up about an incident where a man yelled racial slurs at her while she was working out. She spoke about it on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/p/CA3JUpSnfjg/ | She also wrote about it for Runner's World here: https://www.runnersworld.com/runners-stories/a32825698/nia-akins-ncaa-runner-racial-discrimination/ Follow Nia on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/nia_akins/ Follow Dana: https://twitter.com/dana_gio6 https://www.instagram.com/dana_gio/ Follow us: twitter.com/CitiusMag instagram.com/citiusmag facebook.com/citiusmag

55 MINJUN 29
Comments
Episode 8 | Nia Akins, Brooks Beast and University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing Grad

Episode 7 | Jen Rhines, One of America's Best Distance Runners Of All-Time

Jen Rhines is one of the most accomplished American distance runners in history. She's made 15 U.S. national teams including three Olympic teams. At the 2000 Sydney Olympics, she competed in the 10,000 meters. Four years later, she ran the marathon in Athens. In 2008, she dropped all the way back down to run the 5,000 meters in Beijing. Jen has been an Adidas athlete for more than 20 years. From her website, she boasts that she ranks in the top 10 all-time for the United States in the 3,000 meters, 5,000 meters and 10,000 meters. We chat about her longevity in the sport and how most of her PRs came between the ages of 33 and 36. We'll also learn about her introduction to pro running, what she thinks has attributed to her successes, an inside look at her favorite Olympic memories and much more. Jen currently lives and trains in San Diego, where she helps coach the Golden Coast Track Club alongside her husband Terrence Mahon. For the first time, we have a co-host as Daniel Winn, a professional runner with the Brooklyn Track Club in New York City, joins the show. He was a former teammate of Jen's with the Boston Athletic Association. Follow Jen on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/jenrhines/ Follow Dana: https://twitter.com/dana_gio6 https://www.instagram.com/dana_gio/ Follow us: twitter.com/CitiusMag instagram.com/citiusmag facebook.com/citiusmag

69 MINJUN 23
Comments
Episode 7 | Jen Rhines, One of America's Best Distance Runners Of All-Time

Episode 6 | Marla Runyan, Para Athlete Manager for the Boston Athletic Association

Imagine you are running a track race but instead of seeing your competitors and the clock you can only see blurred colors. You only know who you are racing based on their sponsor kit blur and the colors of the ponytails. When you cross the finish line you don’t know what place you came in or how many people you passed on the final straightaway. This is what racing was like for U.S. Olympian Marla Runyan. On this episode of ‘More than Running with Dana Giordano’: We dive into Marla’s athletic story and her current work to champion for the rights of Para athletes. After losing her vision in elementary school, Marla found freedom in running. Through an unusual path, Marla was successful in many athletic disciplines including high jump, heptathlon, middle distance events and even the marathon. Marla became the first woman to compete in both the Paralympics and Olympic Games. Her story is one of persistence and refusal to let her vision loss define her as a competitor. Marla is currently the Para Athlete manager at the Boston Athletic Association and recently created several new competitive Para Athlete divisions for future Boston Marathons. Follow Marla on Twitter: https://twitter.com/marlaruns Follow Dana: https://twitter.com/dana_gio6 https://www.instagram.com/dana_gio/ Follow us: twitter.com/CitiusMag instagram.com/citiusmag facebook.com/citiusmag

87 MINJUN 12
Comments
Episode 6 | Marla Runyan, Para Athlete Manager for the Boston Athletic Association

Episode 5 | Mary Cain, NYC Manager and Runner for Tracksmith

“I don’t really feel that I need to disprove the idea of burnout. But to me, it’s all a mental thing. The only reason you really walk away is because 1) You just come to hate it and you never really want to do it again or 2) You never come to terms with the fact that you might have to do it differently to get back there. As young women, you wake up, you drink a glass of water, you put your shoes on and you’re out the door. The older you get, maybe you need to stretch a little bit beforehand or do so some extra drills. It’s kind of understanding that’s OK and that your body is going to grow, change and adapt. The longer you’re in the sport, the more you’re going to create rhythms for yourself and knowing that being 24 is still young and there’s a lot of life as a runner and otherwise to live.” Mary Cain joins Dana Giordano for a conversation just days after she announced that she is now a full-time employee of Tracksmith and will help oversee the company's New York City community engagement as a manager. Cain made headlines last fall when she came forward with allegations that she was "emotionally and physically abused" by coach Alberto Salazar as a member of the Nike Oregon Project. She has become one of the running's biggest advocates for women's sports and safe coaching practices as a result of sharing her story. Mary is still training at a professional level and is targeting the 2021 U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials in the 1,500 meters, 800 meters or 5,000 meters. In this conversation, Dana and Mary discuss how Mary overcame her longest injury cycle, her drive growing up, tapering intensity, balancing the concept of burnout, how the New York Times op-doc came about and much more. Subscribe and listen now on Apple Podcasts,Spotify,Google PodcastsandAnchor. Follow Mary on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/runmarycain/ Follow Dana: https://twitter.com/dana_gio6 https://www.instagram.com/dana_gio/ Follow us: twitter.com/CitiusMag instagram.com/citiusmag facebook.com/citiusmag

71 MINMAY 26
Comments
Episode 5 | Mary Cain, NYC Manager and Runner for Tracksmith

Episode 4 | Tiffany Chenault: Salem State Sociology Professor and Black Girls Run Boston Chapter Leader

“The more I ran, the more questions I started to ask about this space. When I would run, I never saw anyone who looked like me. I am an African American woman. I lived in a neighborhood that is not African-American and is a predominantly white and Latinx population. Running in the neighborhood I started to wonder, ‘Do black women run? Do other African American people run? Because I’m not seeing them. I knew I couldn’t be the only person to run. This kind of peaked my curiosity and the questions that I had about this space.” Tiffany Chenault is a sociology professor at Salem State University and the Black Girls Run Boston chapter leader. She is also working on a book about race and its place in the running community. Dana and Tiffany discuss how she found the sport and her initial reaction to seeing very few women like her on the starting line, what got her hooked (she's now run 46 half marathons in 46 states) and the changes/conversations that can take place to do better. Note: This conversation was recorded before the death of Ahmaud Arbery sparked a greater conversation about diversity, race and representation in running. Subscribe and listen now on Apple Podcasts,Spotify,Google PodcastsandAnchor. Follow Tiffany on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/tiffygc1/ Follow Dana: https://twitter.com/dana_gio6 https://www.instagram.com/dana_gio/ Follow us: twitter.com/CitiusMag instagram.com/citiusmag facebook.com/citiusmag

57 MINMAY 18
Comments
Episode 4 | Tiffany Chenault: Salem State Sociology Professor and Black Girls Run Boston Chapter Leader

Episode 3 | Alison Wade of the Fast Women Newsletter

Alison Wade used to operate fast-women.com from 2000 to 2006 and continued covering the sport but worked in other avenues of the running industry. In 2019, she resurrected her coverage in the form of a weekly newsletter that has become a hit within the running community. When she re-launched it, she said: “as a lifelong fan of women’s distance running, I’ve always wished that I could nerd out with more people over the latest news in the sport.” Dana and Alison geek out over Skype to peel back the curtain on how she follows the sport and amplifies the coverage of women in running. On this episode, Dana and Alison discuss: How she balances her time as a mother, coach and author of the newsletter The evolving coverage of running Caring more about the U.S. Olympic track trials compared to the marathon trials Supporting and uplifting all women in the sport The state of female coaches in sport and her experience within athletic departments What’s giving her more hope in the sport How does the newsletter come together and get to people’s inboxes on Monday morning at 5 a.m. And much more... Subscribe to Alison's newsletter here: http://www.fast-women.org/ Follow Dana: https://twitter.com/dana_gio6 https://www.instagram.com/dana_gio/ Follow us: twitter.com/CitiusMag instagram.com/citiusmag facebook.com/citiusmag

50 MINMAY 11
Comments
Episode 3 | Alison Wade of the Fast Women Newsletter

Episode 2 | Elle Purrier: Indoor Mile American Record Holder, Pro Runner for New Balance

“My biggest goal right now is making the Olympic team for 2020. I feel like that’s a start. Sometimes I get a little scared thinking about bigger goals for years and years down the road. I like to do incremental ones. I think I would want to be known as a tough runner. I feel like I’m not super glamorous but a little more blue collar – just getting the work done and being tough. I like to be a badass.” On Feb. 9th, Elle Purrier broke a 37-year-old American record when she won the Millrose Games mile in 4:16.85. Her time took seven-tenths off Mary Slaney's time and now ranks as the second-fastest indoor mile in history. Before her breakout indoor season, Dana and Elle sit down during a high-altitude training stint in Flagstaff, Arizona to dive into some of her upbringings on a dairy farm in northern Vermont and what led to her success at the University of New Hampshire and post-collegiately. She now has her sights set on making her first U.S. Olympic team in 2021. In 2019, Purri...

45 MINMAY 4
Comments
Episode 2 | Elle Purrier: Indoor Mile American Record Holder, Pro Runner for New Balance

Latest Episodes

Episode 11 | Heather MacLean, New Balance Boston

We love to hear about the stories of athletes who always wanted to be Olympians since they were young but what about athletes who took a more circuitous route to success in the sport? If you told Heather MacLean in high school that she would be running professionally and ranked in the top 40 in the world she would have looked at you with three heads. Heather started running track at Peabody because her friend who drove her after school ride to work at a local grocery storewas also doing track. The first in her family to graduate from college from UMass Amherst, Heather's story is one of resilience, drive, and grit. As an NCAA Woman of the Year nominee and cross country All-American, Heather’s collegiate success fell mostly under the radar of the general public. In 2019, Heather had a breakthrough year training in Boston under Mark Coogan with Team New Balance Boston and ran a massive PR in the 1500m of 4:05 and placing 7th at USAs. In a single season, Heather dropped 9 seconds from...

79 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Episode 11 | Heather MacLean, New Balance Boston

Episode 10 | Natalia Petrzela, Ph.D. – New School Associate Professor of History, Marathoner

“I am definitely not the first person to write about the history of fitness but I will say I think I am one of the first people who is connecting fitness culture in America to bigger political and cultural questions and doing so in a kind of popular way...I draw on the work of amazing scholars who have been working on fitness and physical culture but their work has been more within the academy. That’s a real privilege to be doing real research and to help amplify the work of people who have come before. As to why people haven’t thought about this as a meaningful and historical topic, it’s interesting. A lot of times, there’s this irony that our nation is obsessed with fitness. It’s being pushed on us all the time. ‘Work out!’ ‘Buy this machine!’ ‘Join this gym!’ At the same time, we’re one of the least fit nations out there. The question that animates my research is: How did we become a country obsessed with exercise? That is a really new thing. But also, why are we not...

50 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Episode 10 | Natalia Petrzela, Ph.D. – New School Associate Professor of History, Marathoner

Episode 9 | Erin Kenney of Nutrition • Rewired

"I remember going through a pretty awful breakup and just mentally wasn't in a great place. Not knowing much about nutrition, I thought that I wanted to be a better athlete and I had this newfound sense of motivation. What ended up happening was developing this sense of putting a lot of pressure on myself. I just started doing Google searches like people do all the time. It was 'How to be a better athlete?' or 'How to be stronger?' or 'How to be leaner?' And what do you think the results are that came upas ? There are different fad diets, cutting out carbohydrates, only eat this or don't eat that or fruit. Gosh, I must have tried everything. I remember being so depleted at the end of some days. I thought, 'OK. This is just how it's supposed to be. They said this would happen. Just keep eating more protein or do things like that.' There was a point that I got to where I determined, 'This is not sustainable. My performance is now suffering. My mental health is suffering.' That's when I started learning actually and truly what nutrition means." Erin Kenney is a registered dietitian out of Boston who specializes in gastrointestinal disorders, sports nutrition, medicinal cannabis use. The reason I wanted Erin on this podcast was because I thought that she would be super helpful in navigating many relevant topics about fueling by runners. A little bit over a year ago, I reached out to Erin to get some of her advice on how I should be approaching things as a professional athlete. She is also the author of 'Rewire Your Gut' and hosts her own Nutrition Rewired podcast. Follow Erin on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/nutritionrewired/ Check out her website here: https://www.nutritionrewired.com/ Follow Dana: https://twitter.com/dana_gio6 https://www.instagram.com/dana_gio/ Follow us: twitter.com/CitiusMag instagram.com/citiusmag facebook.com/citiusmag

64 MINJUL 7
Comments
Episode 9 | Erin Kenney of Nutrition • Rewired

Episode 8 | Nia Akins, Brooks Beast and University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing Grad

"I definitely felt very different from everyone else and that's definitely, to be honest, a huge reason why I don't really like cross country as much as track. I do feel like there are less people I can relate to or I can even talk to some people about some things I'm experiencing or feeling. I know when I was being recruited at Penn, there was a specific middle distance group that was a mix between 400-800-milers. Those people didn't necessarily run cross country. I was excited about coming into a group like that. When the coaches changed a bit, now I was a distance runner. I was running cross country and I was the only individual of color. I think that was a very different experience. To anyone who is listening, who is one of very few or maybe the only person of color on their team, you're supposed to be in that space. Just being in that space is doing a lot for not only you but the Black community at large. You're immersing people in your experiences and perspectives, even if you're not saying that much or anything about being Black. It's felt by everybody. Your presence is definitely felt and you're making an impact by doing that. I've had some really great people in my circle outside of just my immediate training group that did a good job of telling me, "You're supposed to be here. You can do well here." I think that helped me have that degree of success that I had in cross country and prepared me well for track." ------ Nia Akins joins Dana Giordano just days after signing a professional contract to run for the Brooks Beasts training group in Seattle, Washington. She just wrapped up an accomplished career at the University of Pennsylvania, where she was a two-time NCAA runner-up in the 800 meters and boasts a 2:00.71 indoor personal best in the event. She also graduated with a degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. In this episode, they discuss her decision to turn pro amid a global pandemic, the accomplished final goals wiped away due to COVID-19, balancing her coursework at the No. 1 nursing school in the country, her conversations regarding the Black Lives Matter movement and what her hope is for society and sport moving forward. In May, she opened up about an incident where a man yelled racial slurs at her while she was working out. She spoke about it on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/p/CA3JUpSnfjg/ | She also wrote about it for Runner's World here: https://www.runnersworld.com/runners-stories/a32825698/nia-akins-ncaa-runner-racial-discrimination/ Follow Nia on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/nia_akins/ Follow Dana: https://twitter.com/dana_gio6 https://www.instagram.com/dana_gio/ Follow us: twitter.com/CitiusMag instagram.com/citiusmag facebook.com/citiusmag

55 MINJUN 29
Comments
Episode 8 | Nia Akins, Brooks Beast and University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing Grad

Episode 7 | Jen Rhines, One of America's Best Distance Runners Of All-Time

Jen Rhines is one of the most accomplished American distance runners in history. She's made 15 U.S. national teams including three Olympic teams. At the 2000 Sydney Olympics, she competed in the 10,000 meters. Four years later, she ran the marathon in Athens. In 2008, she dropped all the way back down to run the 5,000 meters in Beijing. Jen has been an Adidas athlete for more than 20 years. From her website, she boasts that she ranks in the top 10 all-time for the United States in the 3,000 meters, 5,000 meters and 10,000 meters. We chat about her longevity in the sport and how most of her PRs came between the ages of 33 and 36. We'll also learn about her introduction to pro running, what she thinks has attributed to her successes, an inside look at her favorite Olympic memories and much more. Jen currently lives and trains in San Diego, where she helps coach the Golden Coast Track Club alongside her husband Terrence Mahon. For the first time, we have a co-host as Daniel Winn, a professional runner with the Brooklyn Track Club in New York City, joins the show. He was a former teammate of Jen's with the Boston Athletic Association. Follow Jen on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/jenrhines/ Follow Dana: https://twitter.com/dana_gio6 https://www.instagram.com/dana_gio/ Follow us: twitter.com/CitiusMag instagram.com/citiusmag facebook.com/citiusmag

69 MINJUN 23
Comments
Episode 7 | Jen Rhines, One of America's Best Distance Runners Of All-Time

Episode 6 | Marla Runyan, Para Athlete Manager for the Boston Athletic Association

Imagine you are running a track race but instead of seeing your competitors and the clock you can only see blurred colors. You only know who you are racing based on their sponsor kit blur and the colors of the ponytails. When you cross the finish line you don’t know what place you came in or how many people you passed on the final straightaway. This is what racing was like for U.S. Olympian Marla Runyan. On this episode of ‘More than Running with Dana Giordano’: We dive into Marla’s athletic story and her current work to champion for the rights of Para athletes. After losing her vision in elementary school, Marla found freedom in running. Through an unusual path, Marla was successful in many athletic disciplines including high jump, heptathlon, middle distance events and even the marathon. Marla became the first woman to compete in both the Paralympics and Olympic Games. Her story is one of persistence and refusal to let her vision loss define her as a competitor. Marla is currently the Para Athlete manager at the Boston Athletic Association and recently created several new competitive Para Athlete divisions for future Boston Marathons. Follow Marla on Twitter: https://twitter.com/marlaruns Follow Dana: https://twitter.com/dana_gio6 https://www.instagram.com/dana_gio/ Follow us: twitter.com/CitiusMag instagram.com/citiusmag facebook.com/citiusmag

87 MINJUN 12
Comments
Episode 6 | Marla Runyan, Para Athlete Manager for the Boston Athletic Association

Episode 5 | Mary Cain, NYC Manager and Runner for Tracksmith

“I don’t really feel that I need to disprove the idea of burnout. But to me, it’s all a mental thing. The only reason you really walk away is because 1) You just come to hate it and you never really want to do it again or 2) You never come to terms with the fact that you might have to do it differently to get back there. As young women, you wake up, you drink a glass of water, you put your shoes on and you’re out the door. The older you get, maybe you need to stretch a little bit beforehand or do so some extra drills. It’s kind of understanding that’s OK and that your body is going to grow, change and adapt. The longer you’re in the sport, the more you’re going to create rhythms for yourself and knowing that being 24 is still young and there’s a lot of life as a runner and otherwise to live.” Mary Cain joins Dana Giordano for a conversation just days after she announced that she is now a full-time employee of Tracksmith and will help oversee the company's New York City community engagement as a manager. Cain made headlines last fall when she came forward with allegations that she was "emotionally and physically abused" by coach Alberto Salazar as a member of the Nike Oregon Project. She has become one of the running's biggest advocates for women's sports and safe coaching practices as a result of sharing her story. Mary is still training at a professional level and is targeting the 2021 U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials in the 1,500 meters, 800 meters or 5,000 meters. In this conversation, Dana and Mary discuss how Mary overcame her longest injury cycle, her drive growing up, tapering intensity, balancing the concept of burnout, how the New York Times op-doc came about and much more. Subscribe and listen now on Apple Podcasts,Spotify,Google PodcastsandAnchor. Follow Mary on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/runmarycain/ Follow Dana: https://twitter.com/dana_gio6 https://www.instagram.com/dana_gio/ Follow us: twitter.com/CitiusMag instagram.com/citiusmag facebook.com/citiusmag

71 MINMAY 26
Comments
Episode 5 | Mary Cain, NYC Manager and Runner for Tracksmith

Episode 4 | Tiffany Chenault: Salem State Sociology Professor and Black Girls Run Boston Chapter Leader

“The more I ran, the more questions I started to ask about this space. When I would run, I never saw anyone who looked like me. I am an African American woman. I lived in a neighborhood that is not African-American and is a predominantly white and Latinx population. Running in the neighborhood I started to wonder, ‘Do black women run? Do other African American people run? Because I’m not seeing them. I knew I couldn’t be the only person to run. This kind of peaked my curiosity and the questions that I had about this space.” Tiffany Chenault is a sociology professor at Salem State University and the Black Girls Run Boston chapter leader. She is also working on a book about race and its place in the running community. Dana and Tiffany discuss how she found the sport and her initial reaction to seeing very few women like her on the starting line, what got her hooked (she's now run 46 half marathons in 46 states) and the changes/conversations that can take place to do better. Note: This conversation was recorded before the death of Ahmaud Arbery sparked a greater conversation about diversity, race and representation in running. Subscribe and listen now on Apple Podcasts,Spotify,Google PodcastsandAnchor. Follow Tiffany on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/tiffygc1/ Follow Dana: https://twitter.com/dana_gio6 https://www.instagram.com/dana_gio/ Follow us: twitter.com/CitiusMag instagram.com/citiusmag facebook.com/citiusmag

57 MINMAY 18
Comments
Episode 4 | Tiffany Chenault: Salem State Sociology Professor and Black Girls Run Boston Chapter Leader

Episode 3 | Alison Wade of the Fast Women Newsletter

Alison Wade used to operate fast-women.com from 2000 to 2006 and continued covering the sport but worked in other avenues of the running industry. In 2019, she resurrected her coverage in the form of a weekly newsletter that has become a hit within the running community. When she re-launched it, she said: “as a lifelong fan of women’s distance running, I’ve always wished that I could nerd out with more people over the latest news in the sport.” Dana and Alison geek out over Skype to peel back the curtain on how she follows the sport and amplifies the coverage of women in running. On this episode, Dana and Alison discuss: How she balances her time as a mother, coach and author of the newsletter The evolving coverage of running Caring more about the U.S. Olympic track trials compared to the marathon trials Supporting and uplifting all women in the sport The state of female coaches in sport and her experience within athletic departments What’s giving her more hope in the sport How does the newsletter come together and get to people’s inboxes on Monday morning at 5 a.m. And much more... Subscribe to Alison's newsletter here: http://www.fast-women.org/ Follow Dana: https://twitter.com/dana_gio6 https://www.instagram.com/dana_gio/ Follow us: twitter.com/CitiusMag instagram.com/citiusmag facebook.com/citiusmag

50 MINMAY 11
Comments
Episode 3 | Alison Wade of the Fast Women Newsletter

Episode 2 | Elle Purrier: Indoor Mile American Record Holder, Pro Runner for New Balance

“My biggest goal right now is making the Olympic team for 2020. I feel like that’s a start. Sometimes I get a little scared thinking about bigger goals for years and years down the road. I like to do incremental ones. I think I would want to be known as a tough runner. I feel like I’m not super glamorous but a little more blue collar – just getting the work done and being tough. I like to be a badass.” On Feb. 9th, Elle Purrier broke a 37-year-old American record when she won the Millrose Games mile in 4:16.85. Her time took seven-tenths off Mary Slaney's time and now ranks as the second-fastest indoor mile in history. Before her breakout indoor season, Dana and Elle sit down during a high-altitude training stint in Flagstaff, Arizona to dive into some of her upbringings on a dairy farm in northern Vermont and what led to her success at the University of New Hampshire and post-collegiately. She now has her sights set on making her first U.S. Olympic team in 2021. In 2019, Purri...

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Episode 2 | Elle Purrier: Indoor Mile American Record Holder, Pro Runner for New Balance
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