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Runners of NYC

Runners of NYC Podcast

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Runners of NYC

Runners of NYC

Runners of NYC Podcast

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About Us

Bringing you untold stories behind luminaries and legends of the New York City’s running culture. A new show from the CITIUS MAG Podcast Network. Hosted by Leigh Anne Sharek and Chris Chavez.Support us on Patreon: https://patreon.com/runnersofnycSubscribe to our newsletter: https://mailchi.mp/6cd793688a6d/runnersofnyc

Latest Episodes

Episode 45 – Rudy Garcia-Tolson, Four-Time U.S. Paralympic Swimmer and Runner

“By being last, I obviously didn’t want to be last. I wanted to just beat one kid in swimming, running or whatever it was. I just wanted to get a little bit faster. Having that mindset of ‘getting a little bit faster’ is really what took me all around the world on a competitive world stage. Just wanting to be a little bit better each day and each time I compete...It was a slow progression of keep moving forward and really not letting the naysayers get to you. When you’re doing something unique and different, there will always be people who say that will not be possible or something negative about it.” Rudy Garcia-Tolson is a four-time U.S. Paralympian in swimming and track. He has got a truly inspiring story that starts with being born with popliteal pterygium syndrome that resulted in a club foot, webbed fingers on both hands, a cleft lip and the inability to straighten his legs. At 5 years old and after many operations, he made the decision to amputate both of his legs and move forward with his life on prosthetics. This allowed him to get his start in sports and primarily swimming where he’d usually be the last one to finish races. He never gave up and set incremental goals along the way, which eventually landed him representing the U.S. at the 2004 Summer Games in Athens. When it comes to running, he has set American records in his age group and classification in distances from the 400 meters to the half marathon. He has also completed an Ironman. In addition to all of that, he’s done a lot of work with New York Road Runners in guiding kids with disabilities to get their own start in sports and running. You’d think that four Paralympics would be enough for someone but the pandemic has bought him an extra year to try and make a run for a 5th. He was recently profiled in The New York Times about this because there was a point where he had to improvise and just run 10 miles in Brooklyn without much else to do for training. We hope you all learn more about everything Rudy has had to overcome and persevere. Read Rudy's story in the Times by Matthew Futterman: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/15/sports/olympics/rudy-garcia-tolson-paralympics.html Follow Rudy on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rudygarciatolson/ MERCH NOW AVAILABLE HERE: https://www.bonfire.com/runners-of-nyc-podcast/ Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

53 MIN1 w ago
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Episode 45 – Rudy Garcia-Tolson, Four-Time U.S. Paralympic Swimmer and Runner

Episode 44 – Jason Fulford of The Running Edge and Black Men Run

“I think where the dialogue really happens is in a Black Men Run group chat that we have. Just think about what we’re all feeling when that situation happens with George Floyd or Ahmaud Arbery. It really gets to a point where we don’t feel OK. We’re not alright. We try to support each other as best as we can but the reality is our job as Black Men Run is to show our community what we can do as a unit through running and to be role models. When I joined and we started doing the hood runs, just seeing the power of people in those communities seeing us as a unit and sticking together, I can’t even put a value on that. It’s so grand. That’s where a lot of hope lies – in seeing Black men like ourselves stepping out there and choosing to stick together in a positive way. In Black Men Run, we have doctors, principals, lawyers, chiropractors, educators and the list goes on. It’s just a good place where not only are we connecting through running but we stay connected outside of that and work on various things. It wasn’t a big group when they started in New York City. They stuck with it. That to me and where we’re at now is more about how they built that. Now, how do I take what they built and figure out what I can build through the things I have talent in. They were really pivotal in being an example to me and the power of sticking together with something that has meaning. One thing I’m learning is: Everything I want to do has to have a purpose. I try to think of that purpose before I do it. I’m starting to speak up with a purpose. I want people to be more vulnerable. I want people to share their stories. I want them to let people know how they’re really feeling. I think for too long and in my workplace with certain friends that I have who are white, I’ve held back on having real conversations with them for a real long time. Do you know who that’s affecting the most? Me. Because I’m holding that inside. I can’t reach my full potential until I let all of this out. My biggest message to people is to encourage them to use their voice. We all have a story. Life is difficult. Whether you’re dealing with racism or some other trauma that maybe you’ve been dealing with since you were a kid, these stories need to be let out. I’d rather know the real you than the person you perceive to be. To me, that’s when we can brick by brick lay the foundation for a better future for our youth. They need to know some of the truth." Jason Fulford is a Gowanus, Brooklyn native. He is the coordinator of community programs for Community Roots Charter School. When he's not working, he's likely running as a member of Black Men Run and The Running Edge. He is also known as the cousin of Eric Garner, who died on July 17, 2014 when a New York City police officer tackled him and put him into a fatal chokehold. Garner's dying words – "I can't breathe" – helped galvanize the Black Lives Matter movement to protest racial injustice in America. Five years after Garner's death, Jason partnered with Overthrow NYC to host the Run for Justice in 2019. This year, the run is back and will be held on July 18. Hear about Jason's work as an activist, how running has been his therapy, his role as a father and educator during this important movement, his relationship with Eric Garner and what his hope is for the future. Follow Jason on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/jayfuf15/ Register for the Run for Justice here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/run-for-justice-2020-tickets-109435273850 New Yorker article: https://www.newyorker.com/culture/video-dept/eric-garners-family-is-still-grieving Garner Way Foundation

88 MINJUL 1
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Episode 44 – Jason Fulford of The Running Edge and Black Men Run

Episode 43 – Nova Church of Bronx Sole

"My daughter said to me the other day, 'I want to be a police officer, Daddy, so I can be a good one and make changes.' I said, 'That's good, baby. Listen to all the conversations that are happening because you don't have to make this decision yet. Originally, she wanted to be a teacher. My mother is a teacher. I'm kind of a teacher in how I articulate things to my community. Now with everything going on, I think she's kind of re-thinking things and trying to figure out her purpose in all of this. She's also hearing about the children of the future. She said that to me yesterday, 'Daddy, I keep hearing them say 'children of the future' and that's me, right?' She's understanding that she's going to be the one and her generation are going to be the ones to change this indefinitely. We're moving the big boulders out of the way but they're going to come through and they're going to clean up the dirt and get the rubble out. They're going to get something growing here." Nova Church is a captain for The Bronx Sole. If his voice sounds a little bit familiar to you, it's because he was one of the leaders who spoke at Coffey's run to protest. If you haven't listened to that episode yet, we highly recommend checking it out. In this episode, we continue the conversation amid the Black Lives Matter movement about the changes that we're pushing for as a community. Nova expands on his call to action and what he wants to see from all of us. He also shares some insight into how he started getting active in running, why helping improve the health of the Bronx keeps him motivated and the unity among the Bronx running division. People said 'The marathon continues' when Nipsey Hussle died but Nova is someone who is living that daily. Follow Nova Church on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/nova.church/ Follow The Bronx Sole on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/bronxsole/ Nova's suggested charity: The Bronx Defenders is a public defender nonprofit that is radically transforming how low-income people in the Bronx are represented in the justice system and, in doing so, is transforming the system itself. For more information visit: https://www.bronxdefenders.org/ ️ Please consider supporting our work. We want to continue pushing out the podcast on a bi-weekly basis and bring you quality audio for our guests. we're simply asking for you to set aside a few dollars that might go toward a coffee or dollar slice to support our work. In return, we'll do our best to put together exclusive episodes, interviews and maybe some video for those supporters. The NYC running community is awesome and we'd appreciate the assistance: www.patreon.com/runnersofnyc MERCH NOW AVAILABLE HERE: https://www.bonfire.com/runners-of-nyc-podcast/

76 MINJUN 23
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Episode 43 – Nova Church of Bronx Sole

Running To Protest | All Crews, One Crew

On Sunday, June 14th, hundreds of New York City runners gathered at the East River Amphitheatre for a two-mile protest run against racial injustice and police brutality in America. The run was organized by Coffey – who was recently a guest on our show and has emerged as one of the city's most vocal activists in the fight against racism. He called on all New York City runners to come together and run together as one community. He initially expected 40 to 60 people to show up but there were hundreds. It was further proof that everyone in the running community will take the time to run together, protest together, listen together and make change together. After the run, there was a speaker series with crew leaders sharing personal stories of their encounters with racism, what it means to be Black in America and how you can help make a change. Coffey granted us permission to share the audio from the conversation. The speakers are listed below with timestamps so that you can pick up on h...

91 MINJUN 16
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Running To Protest | All Crews, One Crew

Episode 42 – Ameerah Omar, Adidas Runners NYC & Girls Run NYC

"I saw that there was this lack of representation within this space. Even though I'm going it at a recreational level, I started to see the reactions and responses to people who were finding out that this is something I was actually doing. It is very normal for folks to just think, 'Oh you're in the sprinter category or you're you're more for short, fast distances or jumping' and that's the end of the road. Even my family and friends finding out that I am running these longer distances, my parents were even like, 'Oh my gosh. This is so wild and we're so excited to see you.' My little cousins were looking up to me and saying, 'Oh my God, Ameerah! This is so cool that you're doing this' and asking questions. For me, seeing that beginning to happen made me think there's something that's here. There's this sense of representation that's definitely lacking. Now that I have this opportunity to show up and be in this space, it's super important to stay there and continue moving forward. This is available to any and everybody...There's a lot of self-limiting beliefs but then we also have socioeconomic limitations that are set on certain groups of people. Speaking to this conversation and leaning into just showing up. I'm a huge advocate of just showing up. That's something that I always say. For me personally, it became this super important thing to just keep showing up and taking up space to a certain degree." Ameerah Omar is a self-development coach and meditation teacher but also the mindset coach for Adidas Runners and one of the first members of Girls Run NYC. In this episode, Ameerah shares some advice for how we can all go about getting in the right headspace in such weird times, the importance of a routine and taking inventory of your well-being at the moment. We dive into her upbringing, her introduction to sport and how she went from a multi-sport athlete in college to frequently running marathons. Ameerah shares some insights into her involvement and the mission of Girls Run NYC as one of the city's groups using running as service and helping others. We also continue the discussion of race and running with Ameerah and how she's been grappling with the news of Ahmaud Arbery's death. Ameerah was another guest that was frequently requested from our listeners so we're happy to finally bring you her story. Follow Ameerah on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ameerah_omar/ Check out Girls Run NYC on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/girlsrunnyc/ ️ Please consider supporting our work. We want to continue pushing out the podcast on a bi-weekly basis and bring you quality audio for our guests. we're simply asking for you to set aside a few dollars that might go toward a coffee or dollar slice to support our work. In return, we'll do our best to put together exclusive episodes, interviews and maybe some video for those supporters. The NYC running community is awesome and we'd appreciate the assistance: www.patreon.com/runnersofnyc MERCH NOW AVAILABLE HERE: https://www.bonfire.com/runners-of-nyc-podcast/

81 MINMAY 19
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Episode 42 – Ameerah Omar, Adidas Runners NYC & Girls Run NYC

Episode 41 – Coffey, Define New York Run Club

"My grandfather told us from the jump, ‘Don’t ever let color separate you from anything. Don’t the color of green get you into any kind of trouble with another color but always accept another color besides your color and because we can all be a family together. Don’t worry about whoever it is that hates your color. You were born this color for a reason and wear it with pride.’ That’s what I’ve been doing since that day. I’m not afraid to speak my mind because I’m black. I just pay attention to my surroundings at all times at 110% level." To start, we address the death of Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old black man in Georgia who was fatally gunned down by two white men while jogging near his home. Arbery was killed on Feb. 23. A legal argument from a district attorney, who later recused himself from the case, follows and says that no one should be arrested. However, after the 36-second video footage of the shooting is made public, outrage follows and the two men are eventually arrested. Gregory McMichael, 64, and his son Travis McMichael, 34, were arrested and charged with murder and aggravated assault. Harlem Run founder Alison Desir (who was a guest on this podcast) expressed her frustration with the lack of coverage by the sports and running media. Following her Instagram post, coverage ramped up and Arbery's face was posted everywhere. Desir wrote the following essay for Outside Magazine. You can read it here (https://www.outsideonline.com/2413115/ahmaud-arbery-murder-whiteness-running-community) This is an issue that is certainly important and underscores that we could all do better about having and acting on these conversations. Our guest for this episode is Coffey. He is a father, husband, filmmaker, Nike running pacer and the founder of Define New York Run Club. This conversation was on our schedule before the Arbery shooting but we take the first 30 minutes of our talk to address the story, its impact on him and how he relates to the likes of Ahmaud Arbery, Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin. We go back to his roots in North Carolina, how he got his start in fashion and filmmaking, why he got hooked on group running and then ultimately starting his own group. You may have seen him on recent episodes of ‘For Life’ but his big project has been the short film “About the People” which hosts a very powerful and honest conversation about social justice and inequalities by black and brown men at the hands of police brutality. Coffey was one of the writers on the film and drew some inspiration from the conversations he’s had to have with his oldest son on police brutality. Follow Coffey on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ThatCoffeyBoy/ Follow Define New York Run Club: https://www.instagram.com/DefineNewYorkRunClub/ More on 'About The People': https://www.instagram.com/AboutThePeopleFilm/ ️ Please consider supporting our work. We want to continue pushing out the podcast on a bi-weekly basis and bring you quality audio for our guests. we're simply asking for you to set aside a few dollars that might go toward a coffee or dollar slice to support our work. In return, we'll do our best to put together exclusive episodes, interviews and maybe some video for those supporters. The NYC running community is awesome and we'd appreciate the assistance: www.patreon.com/runnersofnyc MERCH NOW AVAILABLE HERE: https://www.bonfire.com/runners-of-nyc-podcast/

134 MINMAY 12
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Episode 41 – Coffey, Define New York Run Club

Episode 40 - Ana Johnson, RN at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Distance Project NYC

"It's been pretty overwhelming and stressful at work. I am in the gastroenterology and hematology unit at Memorial Sloan Kettering. Every floor in the building specializes in a specific type of cancer. For now, I'm not working directly with COVID patients but we have about four to six floors exclusively for COVID patients. My floor is taking in cancer patients from all the other floors. It's a very stressful environment even though I'm not taking care of COVID patients. There were a lot of positive cases between patients and nurses in my unit. I have not tested positive, thank goodness. We all have to wear personal protective equipment even though we're not a COVID unit. My hospital has been amazing in protecting us with enough PPE, giving us support and implementing a lot of testing for COVID. All the nurses in my unit have to get swabbed every week and we're also swabbing our patients every two days. When the coronavirus started, we all didn't know much about it and so seeing my colleagues getting infected was so overwhelming. My biggest fear that I had – and I still have it – every time I go to work is to bring the virus to my apartment and my family, especially my mom. She's my primary caregiver. She's over 60 years old. It's pretty scary but I'm taking all the necessary precautions just before I enter my apartment to see them. I love my hospital. I love my job and helping people with cancer in emotional and physical aspects. They're very special to me. It is sad and feels like a different world when patients and their loved ones are suffering and struggling to survive. At the end of my shift, it makes me feel like a better person and I thank God for my life, my family and I just want to go home to hug my kids." Today is National Nurses Day and we're super thankful to have amazing medical professionals working on the frontlines in hospitals combating the coronavirus pandemic. We're fortunate to share a conversation with Ana Johnson, an oncology nurse at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and a runner with Distance Project NYC who has shown resiliency and heroism in these devastating times. Our chat touches on the state of work at the moment but also sheds some positivity from her upbringing in Mexico, starting running at a young age, a made-for-Hollywood love story, being a mom to two kids and qualifying for the U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials. Follow Ana on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/anajohnson8/ NEWSLETTER SIGN UP - mailchi.mp/6cd793688a6d/runnersofnyc ️ Please consider supporting our work. We want to continue pushing out the podcast on a bi-weekly basis and bring you quality audio for our guests. we're simply asking for you to set aside a few dollars that might go toward a coffee or dollar slice to support our work. In return, we'll do our best to put together exclusive episodes, interviews and maybe some video for those supporters. The NYC running community is awesome and we'd appreciate the assistance: www.patreon.com/runnersofnyc MERCH NOW AVAILABLE HERE: https://www.bonfire.com/runners-of-nyc-podcast/

57 MINMAY 7
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Episode 40 - Ana Johnson, RN at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Distance Project NYC

Episode 39 – Peter Ciacca, Former NYRR President of Events & New York City Marathon Race Director

"Around Labor Day of 2019, I had to go into the hospital for open-heart surgery. That was quite unexpected. Totally unexpected. Didn't realize that. I had no signs of anything going wrong with my body. I was actually training to do the Ragnar Napa with a bunch of friends. We were going to go out there and revisit our old ultra team. A bunch of old geezers were going to go out and run this race so I was training for that. I just happened to go into the doctors for a checkup. One thing led to another and I found out I had a major aneurysm on my aorta and that needed to be taken care of right away. I spent Labor Day weekend getting that tended to. When I got out of the hospital, I got back out to Montauk and started rehabbing and walking. My last visit to the doctor, which was around November maybe, they gave me a thumbs up that I could start training and running. So I have this big bodacious goal to run the 2020 marathon in New York." After consulting with some of our listeners, we he...

75 MINAPR 21
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Episode 39 – Peter Ciacca, Former NYRR President of Events & New York City Marathon Race Director

Episode 38 – Kira Garry

"I feel really lucky that I wasn't hurt in college but I’m definitely dealing with what a lot of injured college runners deal with. In some ways, it's a bit of an identity crisis. I've been injured now for about eight months at this point. I came back for a little bit but I'm still struggling right now. Even though deep down I know I'll run again and I'll be healthy, I think you do so grieve in a way of losing running – especially when it's a huge part of your community." Kira Garry is a research coordinator at NYU Langone Health. She was a five-time academic All-American in college while competing for Yale and Michigan. She has her masters in public health from Michigan and her senior thesis was on the history, management and anthropological perspective of the Ebola epidemic in 2014. In addition to her professional work, Kira is also a standout runner in the city with her eyes on the now-2021 U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials. She’s competed at U.S. Championships in the past s...

62 MINAPR 18
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Episode 38 – Kira Garry

Bonus Episode: David Kilgore Ran 100 Miles to Raise $10K for Coronavirus Relief Efforts

Caught up with past guest David Kilgore to recap and explain why he ran 100 miles in less than 18 hours on Friday. He raised more than $10,000 for gift cards from local running retailers in New York City, which would then be donated to NYC Health + Hospitals to provide medical workers with supportive footwear while they work long days to combat the coronavirus pandemic. If you haven't listened to David's original appearance on the podcast for more crazy endurance stories, check it out. http://citiusmag.com/runners-of-nyc-podcast-david-kilgore/ You can donate to the GoFundMe page here: https://www.gofundme.com/f/6s2cf-covid19-community-support Photo by Brendan Clarke

17 MINMAR 29
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Bonus Episode: David Kilgore Ran 100 Miles to Raise $10K for Coronavirus Relief Efforts

Latest Episodes

Episode 45 – Rudy Garcia-Tolson, Four-Time U.S. Paralympic Swimmer and Runner

“By being last, I obviously didn’t want to be last. I wanted to just beat one kid in swimming, running or whatever it was. I just wanted to get a little bit faster. Having that mindset of ‘getting a little bit faster’ is really what took me all around the world on a competitive world stage. Just wanting to be a little bit better each day and each time I compete...It was a slow progression of keep moving forward and really not letting the naysayers get to you. When you’re doing something unique and different, there will always be people who say that will not be possible or something negative about it.” Rudy Garcia-Tolson is a four-time U.S. Paralympian in swimming and track. He has got a truly inspiring story that starts with being born with popliteal pterygium syndrome that resulted in a club foot, webbed fingers on both hands, a cleft lip and the inability to straighten his legs. At 5 years old and after many operations, he made the decision to amputate both of his legs and move forward with his life on prosthetics. This allowed him to get his start in sports and primarily swimming where he’d usually be the last one to finish races. He never gave up and set incremental goals along the way, which eventually landed him representing the U.S. at the 2004 Summer Games in Athens. When it comes to running, he has set American records in his age group and classification in distances from the 400 meters to the half marathon. He has also completed an Ironman. In addition to all of that, he’s done a lot of work with New York Road Runners in guiding kids with disabilities to get their own start in sports and running. You’d think that four Paralympics would be enough for someone but the pandemic has bought him an extra year to try and make a run for a 5th. He was recently profiled in The New York Times about this because there was a point where he had to improvise and just run 10 miles in Brooklyn without much else to do for training. We hope you all learn more about everything Rudy has had to overcome and persevere. Read Rudy's story in the Times by Matthew Futterman: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/15/sports/olympics/rudy-garcia-tolson-paralympics.html Follow Rudy on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rudygarciatolson/ MERCH NOW AVAILABLE HERE: https://www.bonfire.com/runners-of-nyc-podcast/ Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

53 MIN1 w ago
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Episode 45 – Rudy Garcia-Tolson, Four-Time U.S. Paralympic Swimmer and Runner

Episode 44 – Jason Fulford of The Running Edge and Black Men Run

“I think where the dialogue really happens is in a Black Men Run group chat that we have. Just think about what we’re all feeling when that situation happens with George Floyd or Ahmaud Arbery. It really gets to a point where we don’t feel OK. We’re not alright. We try to support each other as best as we can but the reality is our job as Black Men Run is to show our community what we can do as a unit through running and to be role models. When I joined and we started doing the hood runs, just seeing the power of people in those communities seeing us as a unit and sticking together, I can’t even put a value on that. It’s so grand. That’s where a lot of hope lies – in seeing Black men like ourselves stepping out there and choosing to stick together in a positive way. In Black Men Run, we have doctors, principals, lawyers, chiropractors, educators and the list goes on. It’s just a good place where not only are we connecting through running but we stay connected outside of that and work on various things. It wasn’t a big group when they started in New York City. They stuck with it. That to me and where we’re at now is more about how they built that. Now, how do I take what they built and figure out what I can build through the things I have talent in. They were really pivotal in being an example to me and the power of sticking together with something that has meaning. One thing I’m learning is: Everything I want to do has to have a purpose. I try to think of that purpose before I do it. I’m starting to speak up with a purpose. I want people to be more vulnerable. I want people to share their stories. I want them to let people know how they’re really feeling. I think for too long and in my workplace with certain friends that I have who are white, I’ve held back on having real conversations with them for a real long time. Do you know who that’s affecting the most? Me. Because I’m holding that inside. I can’t reach my full potential until I let all of this out. My biggest message to people is to encourage them to use their voice. We all have a story. Life is difficult. Whether you’re dealing with racism or some other trauma that maybe you’ve been dealing with since you were a kid, these stories need to be let out. I’d rather know the real you than the person you perceive to be. To me, that’s when we can brick by brick lay the foundation for a better future for our youth. They need to know some of the truth." Jason Fulford is a Gowanus, Brooklyn native. He is the coordinator of community programs for Community Roots Charter School. When he's not working, he's likely running as a member of Black Men Run and The Running Edge. He is also known as the cousin of Eric Garner, who died on July 17, 2014 when a New York City police officer tackled him and put him into a fatal chokehold. Garner's dying words – "I can't breathe" – helped galvanize the Black Lives Matter movement to protest racial injustice in America. Five years after Garner's death, Jason partnered with Overthrow NYC to host the Run for Justice in 2019. This year, the run is back and will be held on July 18. Hear about Jason's work as an activist, how running has been his therapy, his role as a father and educator during this important movement, his relationship with Eric Garner and what his hope is for the future. Follow Jason on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/jayfuf15/ Register for the Run for Justice here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/run-for-justice-2020-tickets-109435273850 New Yorker article: https://www.newyorker.com/culture/video-dept/eric-garners-family-is-still-grieving Garner Way Foundation

88 MINJUL 1
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Episode 44 – Jason Fulford of The Running Edge and Black Men Run

Episode 43 – Nova Church of Bronx Sole

"My daughter said to me the other day, 'I want to be a police officer, Daddy, so I can be a good one and make changes.' I said, 'That's good, baby. Listen to all the conversations that are happening because you don't have to make this decision yet. Originally, she wanted to be a teacher. My mother is a teacher. I'm kind of a teacher in how I articulate things to my community. Now with everything going on, I think she's kind of re-thinking things and trying to figure out her purpose in all of this. She's also hearing about the children of the future. She said that to me yesterday, 'Daddy, I keep hearing them say 'children of the future' and that's me, right?' She's understanding that she's going to be the one and her generation are going to be the ones to change this indefinitely. We're moving the big boulders out of the way but they're going to come through and they're going to clean up the dirt and get the rubble out. They're going to get something growing here." Nova Church is a captain for The Bronx Sole. If his voice sounds a little bit familiar to you, it's because he was one of the leaders who spoke at Coffey's run to protest. If you haven't listened to that episode yet, we highly recommend checking it out. In this episode, we continue the conversation amid the Black Lives Matter movement about the changes that we're pushing for as a community. Nova expands on his call to action and what he wants to see from all of us. He also shares some insight into how he started getting active in running, why helping improve the health of the Bronx keeps him motivated and the unity among the Bronx running division. People said 'The marathon continues' when Nipsey Hussle died but Nova is someone who is living that daily. Follow Nova Church on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/nova.church/ Follow The Bronx Sole on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/bronxsole/ Nova's suggested charity: The Bronx Defenders is a public defender nonprofit that is radically transforming how low-income people in the Bronx are represented in the justice system and, in doing so, is transforming the system itself. For more information visit: https://www.bronxdefenders.org/ ️ Please consider supporting our work. We want to continue pushing out the podcast on a bi-weekly basis and bring you quality audio for our guests. we're simply asking for you to set aside a few dollars that might go toward a coffee or dollar slice to support our work. In return, we'll do our best to put together exclusive episodes, interviews and maybe some video for those supporters. The NYC running community is awesome and we'd appreciate the assistance: www.patreon.com/runnersofnyc MERCH NOW AVAILABLE HERE: https://www.bonfire.com/runners-of-nyc-podcast/

76 MINJUN 23
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Episode 43 – Nova Church of Bronx Sole

Running To Protest | All Crews, One Crew

On Sunday, June 14th, hundreds of New York City runners gathered at the East River Amphitheatre for a two-mile protest run against racial injustice and police brutality in America. The run was organized by Coffey – who was recently a guest on our show and has emerged as one of the city's most vocal activists in the fight against racism. He called on all New York City runners to come together and run together as one community. He initially expected 40 to 60 people to show up but there were hundreds. It was further proof that everyone in the running community will take the time to run together, protest together, listen together and make change together. After the run, there was a speaker series with crew leaders sharing personal stories of their encounters with racism, what it means to be Black in America and how you can help make a change. Coffey granted us permission to share the audio from the conversation. The speakers are listed below with timestamps so that you can pick up on h...

91 MINJUN 16
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Running To Protest | All Crews, One Crew

Episode 42 – Ameerah Omar, Adidas Runners NYC & Girls Run NYC

"I saw that there was this lack of representation within this space. Even though I'm going it at a recreational level, I started to see the reactions and responses to people who were finding out that this is something I was actually doing. It is very normal for folks to just think, 'Oh you're in the sprinter category or you're you're more for short, fast distances or jumping' and that's the end of the road. Even my family and friends finding out that I am running these longer distances, my parents were even like, 'Oh my gosh. This is so wild and we're so excited to see you.' My little cousins were looking up to me and saying, 'Oh my God, Ameerah! This is so cool that you're doing this' and asking questions. For me, seeing that beginning to happen made me think there's something that's here. There's this sense of representation that's definitely lacking. Now that I have this opportunity to show up and be in this space, it's super important to stay there and continue moving forward. This is available to any and everybody...There's a lot of self-limiting beliefs but then we also have socioeconomic limitations that are set on certain groups of people. Speaking to this conversation and leaning into just showing up. I'm a huge advocate of just showing up. That's something that I always say. For me personally, it became this super important thing to just keep showing up and taking up space to a certain degree." Ameerah Omar is a self-development coach and meditation teacher but also the mindset coach for Adidas Runners and one of the first members of Girls Run NYC. In this episode, Ameerah shares some advice for how we can all go about getting in the right headspace in such weird times, the importance of a routine and taking inventory of your well-being at the moment. We dive into her upbringing, her introduction to sport and how she went from a multi-sport athlete in college to frequently running marathons. Ameerah shares some insights into her involvement and the mission of Girls Run NYC as one of the city's groups using running as service and helping others. We also continue the discussion of race and running with Ameerah and how she's been grappling with the news of Ahmaud Arbery's death. Ameerah was another guest that was frequently requested from our listeners so we're happy to finally bring you her story. Follow Ameerah on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ameerah_omar/ Check out Girls Run NYC on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/girlsrunnyc/ ️ Please consider supporting our work. We want to continue pushing out the podcast on a bi-weekly basis and bring you quality audio for our guests. we're simply asking for you to set aside a few dollars that might go toward a coffee or dollar slice to support our work. In return, we'll do our best to put together exclusive episodes, interviews and maybe some video for those supporters. The NYC running community is awesome and we'd appreciate the assistance: www.patreon.com/runnersofnyc MERCH NOW AVAILABLE HERE: https://www.bonfire.com/runners-of-nyc-podcast/

81 MINMAY 19
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Episode 42 – Ameerah Omar, Adidas Runners NYC & Girls Run NYC

Episode 41 – Coffey, Define New York Run Club

"My grandfather told us from the jump, ‘Don’t ever let color separate you from anything. Don’t the color of green get you into any kind of trouble with another color but always accept another color besides your color and because we can all be a family together. Don’t worry about whoever it is that hates your color. You were born this color for a reason and wear it with pride.’ That’s what I’ve been doing since that day. I’m not afraid to speak my mind because I’m black. I just pay attention to my surroundings at all times at 110% level." To start, we address the death of Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old black man in Georgia who was fatally gunned down by two white men while jogging near his home. Arbery was killed on Feb. 23. A legal argument from a district attorney, who later recused himself from the case, follows and says that no one should be arrested. However, after the 36-second video footage of the shooting is made public, outrage follows and the two men are eventually arrested. Gregory McMichael, 64, and his son Travis McMichael, 34, were arrested and charged with murder and aggravated assault. Harlem Run founder Alison Desir (who was a guest on this podcast) expressed her frustration with the lack of coverage by the sports and running media. Following her Instagram post, coverage ramped up and Arbery's face was posted everywhere. Desir wrote the following essay for Outside Magazine. You can read it here (https://www.outsideonline.com/2413115/ahmaud-arbery-murder-whiteness-running-community) This is an issue that is certainly important and underscores that we could all do better about having and acting on these conversations. Our guest for this episode is Coffey. He is a father, husband, filmmaker, Nike running pacer and the founder of Define New York Run Club. This conversation was on our schedule before the Arbery shooting but we take the first 30 minutes of our talk to address the story, its impact on him and how he relates to the likes of Ahmaud Arbery, Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin. We go back to his roots in North Carolina, how he got his start in fashion and filmmaking, why he got hooked on group running and then ultimately starting his own group. You may have seen him on recent episodes of ‘For Life’ but his big project has been the short film “About the People” which hosts a very powerful and honest conversation about social justice and inequalities by black and brown men at the hands of police brutality. Coffey was one of the writers on the film and drew some inspiration from the conversations he’s had to have with his oldest son on police brutality. Follow Coffey on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ThatCoffeyBoy/ Follow Define New York Run Club: https://www.instagram.com/DefineNewYorkRunClub/ More on 'About The People': https://www.instagram.com/AboutThePeopleFilm/ ️ Please consider supporting our work. We want to continue pushing out the podcast on a bi-weekly basis and bring you quality audio for our guests. we're simply asking for you to set aside a few dollars that might go toward a coffee or dollar slice to support our work. In return, we'll do our best to put together exclusive episodes, interviews and maybe some video for those supporters. The NYC running community is awesome and we'd appreciate the assistance: www.patreon.com/runnersofnyc MERCH NOW AVAILABLE HERE: https://www.bonfire.com/runners-of-nyc-podcast/

134 MINMAY 12
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Episode 41 – Coffey, Define New York Run Club

Episode 40 - Ana Johnson, RN at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Distance Project NYC

"It's been pretty overwhelming and stressful at work. I am in the gastroenterology and hematology unit at Memorial Sloan Kettering. Every floor in the building specializes in a specific type of cancer. For now, I'm not working directly with COVID patients but we have about four to six floors exclusively for COVID patients. My floor is taking in cancer patients from all the other floors. It's a very stressful environment even though I'm not taking care of COVID patients. There were a lot of positive cases between patients and nurses in my unit. I have not tested positive, thank goodness. We all have to wear personal protective equipment even though we're not a COVID unit. My hospital has been amazing in protecting us with enough PPE, giving us support and implementing a lot of testing for COVID. All the nurses in my unit have to get swabbed every week and we're also swabbing our patients every two days. When the coronavirus started, we all didn't know much about it and so seeing my colleagues getting infected was so overwhelming. My biggest fear that I had – and I still have it – every time I go to work is to bring the virus to my apartment and my family, especially my mom. She's my primary caregiver. She's over 60 years old. It's pretty scary but I'm taking all the necessary precautions just before I enter my apartment to see them. I love my hospital. I love my job and helping people with cancer in emotional and physical aspects. They're very special to me. It is sad and feels like a different world when patients and their loved ones are suffering and struggling to survive. At the end of my shift, it makes me feel like a better person and I thank God for my life, my family and I just want to go home to hug my kids." Today is National Nurses Day and we're super thankful to have amazing medical professionals working on the frontlines in hospitals combating the coronavirus pandemic. We're fortunate to share a conversation with Ana Johnson, an oncology nurse at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and a runner with Distance Project NYC who has shown resiliency and heroism in these devastating times. Our chat touches on the state of work at the moment but also sheds some positivity from her upbringing in Mexico, starting running at a young age, a made-for-Hollywood love story, being a mom to two kids and qualifying for the U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials. Follow Ana on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/anajohnson8/ NEWSLETTER SIGN UP - mailchi.mp/6cd793688a6d/runnersofnyc ️ Please consider supporting our work. We want to continue pushing out the podcast on a bi-weekly basis and bring you quality audio for our guests. we're simply asking for you to set aside a few dollars that might go toward a coffee or dollar slice to support our work. In return, we'll do our best to put together exclusive episodes, interviews and maybe some video for those supporters. The NYC running community is awesome and we'd appreciate the assistance: www.patreon.com/runnersofnyc MERCH NOW AVAILABLE HERE: https://www.bonfire.com/runners-of-nyc-podcast/

57 MINMAY 7
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Episode 40 - Ana Johnson, RN at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Distance Project NYC

Episode 39 – Peter Ciacca, Former NYRR President of Events & New York City Marathon Race Director

"Around Labor Day of 2019, I had to go into the hospital for open-heart surgery. That was quite unexpected. Totally unexpected. Didn't realize that. I had no signs of anything going wrong with my body. I was actually training to do the Ragnar Napa with a bunch of friends. We were going to go out there and revisit our old ultra team. A bunch of old geezers were going to go out and run this race so I was training for that. I just happened to go into the doctors for a checkup. One thing led to another and I found out I had a major aneurysm on my aorta and that needed to be taken care of right away. I spent Labor Day weekend getting that tended to. When I got out of the hospital, I got back out to Montauk and started rehabbing and walking. My last visit to the doctor, which was around November maybe, they gave me a thumbs up that I could start training and running. So I have this big bodacious goal to run the 2020 marathon in New York." After consulting with some of our listeners, we he...

75 MINAPR 21
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Episode 39 – Peter Ciacca, Former NYRR President of Events & New York City Marathon Race Director

Episode 38 – Kira Garry

"I feel really lucky that I wasn't hurt in college but I’m definitely dealing with what a lot of injured college runners deal with. In some ways, it's a bit of an identity crisis. I've been injured now for about eight months at this point. I came back for a little bit but I'm still struggling right now. Even though deep down I know I'll run again and I'll be healthy, I think you do so grieve in a way of losing running – especially when it's a huge part of your community." Kira Garry is a research coordinator at NYU Langone Health. She was a five-time academic All-American in college while competing for Yale and Michigan. She has her masters in public health from Michigan and her senior thesis was on the history, management and anthropological perspective of the Ebola epidemic in 2014. In addition to her professional work, Kira is also a standout runner in the city with her eyes on the now-2021 U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials. She’s competed at U.S. Championships in the past s...

62 MINAPR 18
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Episode 38 – Kira Garry

Bonus Episode: David Kilgore Ran 100 Miles to Raise $10K for Coronavirus Relief Efforts

Caught up with past guest David Kilgore to recap and explain why he ran 100 miles in less than 18 hours on Friday. He raised more than $10,000 for gift cards from local running retailers in New York City, which would then be donated to NYC Health + Hospitals to provide medical workers with supportive footwear while they work long days to combat the coronavirus pandemic. If you haven't listened to David's original appearance on the podcast for more crazy endurance stories, check it out. http://citiusmag.com/runners-of-nyc-podcast-david-kilgore/ You can donate to the GoFundMe page here: https://www.gofundme.com/f/6s2cf-covid19-community-support Photo by Brendan Clarke

17 MINMAR 29
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Bonus Episode: David Kilgore Ran 100 Miles to Raise $10K for Coronavirus Relief Efforts
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