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Prognosis Daily: Coronavirus

Bloomberg

218
Followers
991
Plays
Prognosis Daily: Coronavirus

Prognosis Daily: Coronavirus

Bloomberg

218
Followers
991
Plays
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About Us

Harnessing Bloomberg's reporting from every continent, Bloomberg's daily Prognosis podcast brings the news, data and analysis you need for living in the time of Covid-19. In around ten minutes, we will explain the latest developments in health and science, the impact on individuals, industries and governments and the adaptations they are making in the face of the global pandemic. Come back every weekday afternoon for a short dose of the best information about the novel coronavirus from more than 120 bureaus around the world.

Latest Episodes

Virus Treatment Is Changing

In the almost 200 days since coronavirus cases were first reported in central China, health workers and researchers have raced to learn more about the brand new pathogen. As many as 1,000 Covid-19-related research papers are being released daily. Jason Gale reports that the research, and the experience of front-line health care workers, is informing better ways to diagnose, prevent and treat the disease. That’s helping to save lives.

14 MIN12 h ago
Comments
Virus Treatment Is Changing

Unemployed, Uninsured and Falling Through the Cracks

As a second Coronavirus wave threatens America, a wave of job losses since the disease first hit has left millions without health insurance. Reade Pickert explains that in other developed economies, the newly unemployed could rely on systems of universal health care. In America, they’ve had to navigate a bewildering menu of options to figure out if they have access to a patched-together safety net.

13 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Unemployed, Uninsured and Falling Through the Cracks

A Divided America Feeds the Crisis

The U.S. is home to the highest number of Covid-19 cases—2.6 million and counting—and the most deaths. The reasons for that are at least, in part, very American ones: Politicized science, a fragmented media landscape, and inequality. Executive Editor Brian Bremner reflects on how decades of political division have made the country a coronavirus superpower in the worst way--an outcome that was entirely avoidable.

16 MIN5 d ago
Comments
A Divided America Feeds the Crisis

Why Deaths Seem to Drop as Cases Rise

Coronavirus continues its terrifying rampage of large swaths of the country. But the Trump administration has made a point of mentioning that even while cases are rising, deaths are declining. That disconnect is, he says, proof the Covid-19 pandemic is under control. But the mismatch could be an anomaly caused by quirks in how deaths data is collected and reported. It's not necessarily a sign the coronavirus is becoming less lethal or easier to treat. Robert Langreth and Emma Court report that it’s too soon to know for sure that deaths are still declining.

15 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Why Deaths Seem to Drop as Cases Rise

Learning to Love Big Pharma

Gilead Sciences announced today that it will charge the U.S. government and other developed countries $390 per vial for its coronavirus-fighting drug remdesivir. That begins to answer a big question as drug companies race to find treatments and develop vaccines for the virus: How much will it cost us? But Riley Griffin and Emma Court report that the Pharmaceutical industry is hoping Covid-19 will give it a chance to rebrand; and get the focus off drug prices.

15 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Learning to Love Big Pharma

Keeping Elderly Patients Safe

Around the world, nursing homes and assisted living facilities have been a hotbed for Covid-19 outbreaks. Because older people are particularly vulnerable, the facilities have had some of the deadliest outcomes during the pandemic. But some nursing homes have done much better than others at containing the virus. Angelica LaVito reports on a Seattle-area assisted living company that learned the lessons of the pandemic early, and has managed to keep outbreaks from raging out of control.

14 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Keeping Elderly Patients Safe

What Happened in Houston

In Houston, Texas, new Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations are surging. Some experts expect the virus outbreak to swamp the city’s medical infrastructure by July 4th. Emma Court and Joe Carroll report that if cases keep rising at their current pace in Harris County, which includes Houston, they will triple or quadruple by mid-July. The city’s hospital system may not be able to manage the crisis.

15 MIN1 w ago
Comments
What Happened in Houston

These Gadgets Know You're Sick Before You Do

The NBA is giving players the option to wear a device that tracks their health data when basketball games begin this July. The device - called an Oura Ring - can measure things like the body’s temperature and heart rate. The hope is that it could provide the league with early warning signs that someone may have contracted an illness like COVID-19. Bloomberg reporter Kristen V. Brown reports that the move is part of a larger conversation about whether or not wearable technology like a Fitbit or an Apple Watch can help fight the pandemic.

14 MIN2 w ago
Comments
These Gadgets Know You're Sick Before You Do

The Next Two Years of the Virus

More than six months into a shape-shifting pandemic that’s killed more than 454,000 people worldwide, it’s clear we are losing the battle against the outbreak. Most experts believe an effective vaccine won’t be ready until well into 2021. So how do we adjust our thinking from beating the virus, to coexisting with it?Michelle Fay Cortez discusses the next phase of the virus, and what public health professionals say we have to do to survive it.

15 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The Next Two Years of the Virus

History's Lessons for Our Post-Virus Future

As soon as the Coronavirus became a pandemic, people began making parallels to the Spanish Flu outbreak of 1918, and reaching even further back to the black death of the middle ages. It makes sense--past pandemics may be our only reference point for whole populations being stricken with illness. But they can also tell us a lot about how economies recover after outbreaks. From the Odd Lots podcast, Tracy Alloway and Joe Weisenthal talk to Jamie Catherwood, an expert in finance history, about how Covid-19 is different -- and similar -- to decades-, and even centuries-old diseases.

16 MIN2 w ago
Comments
History's Lessons for Our Post-Virus Future

Latest Episodes

Virus Treatment Is Changing

In the almost 200 days since coronavirus cases were first reported in central China, health workers and researchers have raced to learn more about the brand new pathogen. As many as 1,000 Covid-19-related research papers are being released daily. Jason Gale reports that the research, and the experience of front-line health care workers, is informing better ways to diagnose, prevent and treat the disease. That’s helping to save lives.

14 MIN12 h ago
Comments
Virus Treatment Is Changing

Unemployed, Uninsured and Falling Through the Cracks

As a second Coronavirus wave threatens America, a wave of job losses since the disease first hit has left millions without health insurance. Reade Pickert explains that in other developed economies, the newly unemployed could rely on systems of universal health care. In America, they’ve had to navigate a bewildering menu of options to figure out if they have access to a patched-together safety net.

13 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Unemployed, Uninsured and Falling Through the Cracks

A Divided America Feeds the Crisis

The U.S. is home to the highest number of Covid-19 cases—2.6 million and counting—and the most deaths. The reasons for that are at least, in part, very American ones: Politicized science, a fragmented media landscape, and inequality. Executive Editor Brian Bremner reflects on how decades of political division have made the country a coronavirus superpower in the worst way--an outcome that was entirely avoidable.

16 MIN5 d ago
Comments
A Divided America Feeds the Crisis

Why Deaths Seem to Drop as Cases Rise

Coronavirus continues its terrifying rampage of large swaths of the country. But the Trump administration has made a point of mentioning that even while cases are rising, deaths are declining. That disconnect is, he says, proof the Covid-19 pandemic is under control. But the mismatch could be an anomaly caused by quirks in how deaths data is collected and reported. It's not necessarily a sign the coronavirus is becoming less lethal or easier to treat. Robert Langreth and Emma Court report that it’s too soon to know for sure that deaths are still declining.

15 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Why Deaths Seem to Drop as Cases Rise

Learning to Love Big Pharma

Gilead Sciences announced today that it will charge the U.S. government and other developed countries $390 per vial for its coronavirus-fighting drug remdesivir. That begins to answer a big question as drug companies race to find treatments and develop vaccines for the virus: How much will it cost us? But Riley Griffin and Emma Court report that the Pharmaceutical industry is hoping Covid-19 will give it a chance to rebrand; and get the focus off drug prices.

15 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Learning to Love Big Pharma

Keeping Elderly Patients Safe

Around the world, nursing homes and assisted living facilities have been a hotbed for Covid-19 outbreaks. Because older people are particularly vulnerable, the facilities have had some of the deadliest outcomes during the pandemic. But some nursing homes have done much better than others at containing the virus. Angelica LaVito reports on a Seattle-area assisted living company that learned the lessons of the pandemic early, and has managed to keep outbreaks from raging out of control.

14 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Keeping Elderly Patients Safe

What Happened in Houston

In Houston, Texas, new Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations are surging. Some experts expect the virus outbreak to swamp the city’s medical infrastructure by July 4th. Emma Court and Joe Carroll report that if cases keep rising at their current pace in Harris County, which includes Houston, they will triple or quadruple by mid-July. The city’s hospital system may not be able to manage the crisis.

15 MIN1 w ago
Comments
What Happened in Houston

These Gadgets Know You're Sick Before You Do

The NBA is giving players the option to wear a device that tracks their health data when basketball games begin this July. The device - called an Oura Ring - can measure things like the body’s temperature and heart rate. The hope is that it could provide the league with early warning signs that someone may have contracted an illness like COVID-19. Bloomberg reporter Kristen V. Brown reports that the move is part of a larger conversation about whether or not wearable technology like a Fitbit or an Apple Watch can help fight the pandemic.

14 MIN2 w ago
Comments
These Gadgets Know You're Sick Before You Do

The Next Two Years of the Virus

More than six months into a shape-shifting pandemic that’s killed more than 454,000 people worldwide, it’s clear we are losing the battle against the outbreak. Most experts believe an effective vaccine won’t be ready until well into 2021. So how do we adjust our thinking from beating the virus, to coexisting with it?Michelle Fay Cortez discusses the next phase of the virus, and what public health professionals say we have to do to survive it.

15 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The Next Two Years of the Virus

History's Lessons for Our Post-Virus Future

As soon as the Coronavirus became a pandemic, people began making parallels to the Spanish Flu outbreak of 1918, and reaching even further back to the black death of the middle ages. It makes sense--past pandemics may be our only reference point for whole populations being stricken with illness. But they can also tell us a lot about how economies recover after outbreaks. From the Odd Lots podcast, Tracy Alloway and Joe Weisenthal talk to Jamie Catherwood, an expert in finance history, about how Covid-19 is different -- and similar -- to decades-, and even centuries-old diseases.

16 MIN2 w ago
Comments
History's Lessons for Our Post-Virus Future
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