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Science! With Friends

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Science! With Friends

Science! With Friends

Basement Creators Network

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About Us

Science! with Friends is a podcast exploring life, the universe, and everything through the eyes of the scientists who study it. In interviews and discussion pieces, hosts Jocelyn Bosley (SciTalker) and Bradley Nordell (The Quantum Dude) highlight the personal side of science—the weird, awesome, surprising, humorous, and inspiring stories that make science meaningful in all our lives. What’s your science story?

Latest Episodes

#57 | Discussion | Social science: It works, bitches.

What if there were a way for science—the most comprehensive and powerful system we have for making sense of the world—to explain the innermost stirrings of your heart? To teach you how and why you believe what you do, and how to communicate these values more effectively to others? What if science could show us how to build a better, stronger society? Two words, friends: Social sciences. In this sequel to “The scientific method: Is it a thing?”, Jocelyn and Bradley explore the reasons why the social sciences are sometimes marginalized by and within the broader scientific community. They discuss what it means to have a “testable hypothesis,” and how the ideology of reductionism hinders our scientific understanding of complex phenomena. The hosts also point out the questionable, unscientific(!) assumptions that underlie the effort to separate humans from nature, and the human sciences from the so-called natural sciences. Ultimately, this episode showcases the power and promise of the social sciences, arguing that when we view them as separate from and less than “real” science, we do so to the detriment of ALL science. Science is for Everyone (Episode #35): https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/35-discussion-science-is-for-everyone/id1471423633?i=1000466778549 The scientific method: Is it a thing? (Episode #54): https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/54-discussion-the-scientific-method-is-it-a-thing/id1471423633?i=1000485209730 Case control and cohort studies: https://www.students4bestevidence.net/blog/2017/12/06/case-control-and-cohort-studies-overview/ xkcd, “Purity”: https://xkcd.com/435/ xkcd, “Science”: https://xkcd.com/54/ “What Isaac Asimov Taught Us About Predicting the Future”: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/31/books/review/isaac-asimov-psychohistory.html Particles for Justice letter: https://www.particlesforjustice.org/letter “Plandemic and the Seven Traits of Conspiratorial Thinking”: https://youtu.be/Rban0JGEimE Science Communication journal: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/scx

67 MIN2 d ago
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#57 | Discussion | Social science: It works, bitches.

#56 | John Kiat | Fumbling Towards Empathy

What the world needs now is . . . How would you complete the sentence? At a moment in our history so rife with fear, conflict, and suffering, “empathy” might be a leading candidate. But what is empathy, exactly? Is it an innate human experience, or a skill that can learned? And how can science shed light on such an abstract and elusive concept? Jocelyn and Bradley are joined this week by cognitive psychologist Dr. John Kiat, who describes his research into social cognition and shares his perspective on the role of empathy in navigating our current contentious social and political climate, from wearing masks to confronting systemic racism. The friends also discuss the value of the social sciences more generally, and how neuroscience trumped physics in John’s quest to answer the ultimate questions of our existence, which has shaped his science journey. You can learn more about John’s amazing work at https://www.johnkiat.com/ and at the links below: “What’s in a name? Monikers alter empathy in the brain”: https://news.unl.edu/newsrooms/today/article/whats-in-a-name-monikers-alter-empathy-in-the-brain/ “Study shows how brain anticipates social exclusion”: https://news.unl.edu/newsrooms/today/article/study-shows-how-brain-anticipates-social-exclusion/ UC Davis Center for Mind and Brain: https://mindbrain.ucdavis.edu/ Susan Lanzoni, “A Short History of Empathy”: https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/10/a-short-history-of-empathy/409912/ Scott Barry Kaufman, “What Would Happen If Everyone Truly Believed Everything Is One?”: https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/beautiful-minds/what-would-happen-if-everyone-truly-believed-everything-is-one/ Paul Bloom, Against Empathy: The Case for Rational Compassion: https://www.amazon.com/Against-Empathy-Case-Rational-Compassion/dp/0062339338 Viktor Frankl, Man’s Search For Meaning: https://www.amazon.com/Mans-Search-Meaning-Viktor-Frankl/dp/080701429X Robert Sapolsky, Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers: https://www.amazon.com/Why-Zebras-Dont-Ulcers-Third/dp/0805073698

72 MIN1 w ago
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#56 | John Kiat | Fumbling Towards Empathy

#55 | Beata Mierzwa | The Splendor in Our Cells

Think you learned everything you need to know about cell division in middle school? Dr. Beata Mierzwa is here to show you how wonderfully, sublimely, beautifully wrong you are! She joins Jocelyn and Bradley to discuss her work as a molecular biologist, a science artist, and a AAAS IF/THEN Ambassador. She explains how her scientific research is setting the stage for the development of new, specialized cancer therapies, and how she is using the beautiful images produced in her research to design spectacular scientific fashions! The friends discuss how art not only serves as a uniquely powerful means to communicate complex science to diverse audiences, but also helps scientists themselves see and think about their science in new ways. And Beata shares her advice for anyone who might feel “torn between a desire to understand the wonders of life through science or to create beauty with art.” You can find Beata on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook @beatascienceart, and you can learn more about her amazing work at https://beatascienceart.com/ and at the links below: Art the Science blog: https://artthescience.com/blog/2020/04/03/creators-beata-mierzwa/ “Bridging the Divide Between Science and Art,” Journal of Cell Biology: https://rupress.org/jcb/article/217/12/4051/120307/Beata-Mierzwa-Bridging-the-divide-between-science Etsy shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/BeataScienceArt DIY DNA jewelry: https://youtu.be/iiTeVtCneXY https://beatascienceart.com/DNA-jewelry/ Ludwig Cancer Research: https://www.ludwigcancerresearch.org/ The IF/THEN initiative: https://www.ifthencollection.org/beata https://www.ifthenshecan.org/

63 MIN2 w ago
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#55 | Beata Mierzwa | The Splendor in Our Cells

#54 | Discussion | The scientific method: Is it a thing?

In this corner, we have Bradley “Falsify This” Nordell, arguing that science owes its spectacular success to a coherent and unique scientific method . . . [crowd roars] . . . And in this corner, we have Jocelyn “More is More” Bosley, arguing that a plurality of methods makes science stronger, more powerful, and more inclusive! [crowd goes wild] It’s time for a knock-down-drag-out-no-holds-barred-MMA-style brain brawl* to decide the fate of that most cherished of scientific ideals: the scientific method. Do all scientists really follow the same method? Is there more than one way to be “scientific”? If the scientific method is an oversimplification, does it do more harm or good? And in a time when the power and promise of scientific processes are too often contentious and misunderstood, how can we differentiate good science, bad science, pseudoscience, and non-science? In this week’s episode, the hosts take on all these questions and more. *By which, of course, we mean a thoroughly convivial and lighthearted discussion. To learn more, see:https://medium.com/science-coffee/what-is-science-the-scientific-method-in-your-cup-9ae4301acc93A few books on the philosophy of science:Theory & Reality: https://www.amazon.com/Theory-Reality-Introduction-Philosophy-Foundations/dp/0226300633/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=theory+and+reality&qid=1594921702&sr=8-1What is this thing called science? https://www.amazon.com/What-This-Thing-Called-Science/dp/162466038X/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=what+is+this+thing+called+science&qid=1594921736&sr=8-1Philosophy of Science: a very short introduction: https://www.amazon.com/Philosophy-Science-Very-Short-Introduction/dp/0198745583/ref=sr_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=philosophy+of+science&qid=1594921760&sr=8-3Scientific Method in Practice: https://books.google.com/books?id=iVkugqNG9dAC

79 MIN3 w ago
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#54 | Discussion | The scientific method: Is it a thing?

#53 | Sam Illingworth | We Are All Chimeras

. . . Blindly, we turn oureyes to the sky,searching for breadcrumbsbetween the pathways,oblivious to knowledgethat has always been with us:the map of our universeembraced within a single cell.—Sam Illingworth, “Moulded Galaxies” Once upon a time, there was a young lad who wanted to be a scientist. Or a thespian. Or a science communicator. Or a poet. And then one day he realized that he could be all of those things. In fact, he realized he already was all of those things. He was a chimera. And so are you. In this week’s episode, Jocelyn and Bradley are joined by the wondrous, chimerical Dr. Sam Illingworth: scientist, poet, and science communication researcher. Sam shares the fascinating and provocative results of his research into how poetry can promote engagement and effective dialogue between scientists and non-scientists, and how he is putting this knowledge into practice through his peer-reviewed science poetry journal Consilience. He also talks about his latest book, A Sonnet to Science, and what we can learn from prominent figures in the history of science who also wrote poetry. Ultimately, the friends agree that (contrary to Poe’s “Sonnet—To Science,” for which Sam’s book is named) scientific inquiry ramifies rather than detracts from the wonder, awe, and mystery of the natural world. You can find more information about Sam Illingworth here:•Website: https://www.samillingworth.com/•Consilience Website: https://www.consilience-journal.com/•Effective Science Communication: https://iopscience.iop.org/book/978-0-7503-1170-0•Sonnet to Science: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1526127989/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_10?smid=A24GZIC7EIOZVT&psc=1•Effective Science Communication: https://store.ioppublishing.org/page/detail/Effective-Science-Communication-Second-Edition/?k=9780750325189 •Sonnet to Science: https://manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9781526127983/ •Twitter handle: https://twitter.com/samillingworth•Manchester Game Studies Network: https://www.manchestergamestudies.org/•EO Wilson Consilience: https://www.amazon.com/Consilience-Knowledge-Edward-Osborne-Wilson/dp/067976867X•Carbon City Zero https://www.wearepossible.org/carbon-city-zero

50 MINJUL 11
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#53 | Sam Illingworth | We Are All Chimeras

#52 | Alie Ward | Podcastology

Happy birthday to us!!! We’re commemorating one fabulous year of science and friendship, and who better to help us celebrate than ICONIC science podcaster Alie Ward?!? In this episode, our favorite podcastologist shares highlights and insights from her wide-ranging adventures in science communication. Alie explains how her interests in science and in filmmaking converged; how she connects with ologists of all kinds by helping them to identify what gives them “glitter in their stomachs”; and how entertainment media can play an important role in helping to democratize access to science. The friends also discuss the power of not being afraid to embarrass oneself, and the value of “scicommedy” as a strategy for sharing science. It's PARTY TIME!!! You can find Alie on Twitter @alieward. You can also learn more about her amazing work on her website at https://www.alieward.com/ and at the links below. Ologies:https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ologies/id1278815517https://twitter.com/Ologies Did I Mention Invention?https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL15GihUisSLQDWzesFDPVz8WQ-JXOZIxF Innovation Nation: https://www.thehenryford.org/explore/innovation-nation/ Netflix’s Brainchild: https://www.netflix.com/title/80215086 Nerd Brigade: http://nerdbrigade.la/

81 MINJUL 1
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#52 | Alie Ward | Podcastology

#51 | Alice MillerMacPhee | Science of the People

Black Lives Matter. Say Her Name. Defend DACA. Love is Love. How can science help us understand these calls for social justice, and what does it tell us about the movements behind the hashtags? This week, sociologist and Science Slam champion Alice MillerMacPhee talks with Jocelyn and Bradley about her research on the dynamics of social movements, sharing insights into this unique moment in the Movement for Black Lives, immigrant rights movement, and LGBTQ+ rights movement, among others. Alice helps us understand what systemic racism means and how it works, as well as how intersecting inequalities marginalize some identities and experiences more than others. The friends also discuss the sometimes-contested status of the social sciences within the scientific community, and the value of social science research to illuminate the process of science itself. Finally, Alice reflects on how her scholarship and her activism draw inspiration from one another, as she and her merry band of “unruly sociologists” aim to put their knowledge into action. You can follow Alice on Twitter @alicemilmac and learn more about her amazing work at the links below! Alice’s Science Slam presentations:Power to the People! Or, One Researcher’s Path to Science (2016): https://youtu.be/k1ZC_ZhpSOkA Scientist on Activist Terms (2018): https://youtu.be/pywzTp83IzQThere’s a Method for That (2019): https://youtu.be/KDIPvKKWkiw Colleen Ray’s Science Slam, Slamming the Stigma: https://youtu.be/nfKUbiXIsBw More about Science Slams: https://mrsec.unl.edu/science-slamhttps://youtu.be/5xJ8hYxeYUU Unruly Sociologists on Twitter: https://twitter.com/unrulysoc “It Really is Different This Time” (Politico): https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2020/06/04/protest-different-299050 Joe Pinsker, “America is Already Different Than It Was Two Weeks Ago” (The Atlantic): https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2020/06/george-floyd-protests-already-changed/613000/ Dr. Keisha Blain: http://keishablain.com/ Dr. Tressie McMillan Cottom: https://tressiemc.com/ “Ibram Kendi, one of the nation’s leading scholars of racism, says education and love are not the answer” (The Undefeated): https://theundefeated.com/features/ibram-kendi-leading-scholar-of-racism-says-education-and-love-are-not-the-answer/ Dr. Brittney Cooper: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/brief/294191/brittney-cooper Brittney Cooper, “Why Are Black Women and Girls Still an Afterthought in Our Outrage Over Police Violence?” (Time): https://time.com/5847970/police-brutality-black-women-girls/ The #SayHerName campaign: https://aapf.org/sayhername Jocelyn Bosley, “From Monkey Facts to Human Ideologies:...

89 MINJUN 25
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#51 | Alice MillerMacPhee | Science of the People

#50 | Katie Mack | Cosmos: Endgame

We’re marking our 50th episode with a visit from the extraordinary Dr. Katherine (Katie) Mack— known to her more than 350,000 Twitter followers as AstroKatie— who joins Jocelyn and Bradley for a fascinating and surprisingly jovial discussion of the end of the universe. In the words of Randall Munroe, Katie combines “deep thinking about physics and big-picture awe in the style of Carl Sagan,” outlining the possible fates of our cosmos, from Big Crunch to Big Rip to Big Bounce. She explains how “cosmic eschatologists” like her are evaluating the evidence for these competing scenarios, and what dark energy has to do with it. The friends also discuss how cosmological theories inflect the narratives from which humans create meaning, and why we are so emotionally invested in how the universe ends. Finally, Katie shares highlights of her science journey and some crucial insights about science communication. It’s the end of the universe as we know it, and we feel fine! You can find Katie on Twitter @AstroKatie. You can also learn more about her amazing work on her website at http://www.astrokatie.com/ and at the links below. Pre-order The End of Everything (Astrophysically Speaking): http://www.astrokatie.com/book 2018 UNL Science Slam keynote address: https://youtu.be/twws01vxYZw “Disorientation” by Katie Mack: https://youtu.be/2wT1-bRj9wI A Conversation with Katie Mack (The Perimeter Institute): https://youtu.be/q4a1bzrR65Q North Carolina State Leadership in Public Science Cluster: https://facultyclusters.ncsu.edu/clusters/leadership-in-public-science/

80 MINJUN 17
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#50 | Katie Mack | Cosmos: Endgame

#49 | Attabey Rodríguez Benítez | Enzymes Where the Party’s At

If you’ve ever wondered if Beyoncé has a scientific counterpart, wonder no more: it’s Attabey Rodríguez Benítez, a.k.a. Science Bey! Attabey is a chemical biologist and bilingual science communicator with a passion for understanding Nature’s power and sharing it with others. She explains how her research is helping us learn about the many tricks enzymes can do, as well as teaching them novel tricks that can be used in disease therapies. She also shares her journey as a first-generation college student, telling us how her work as a scientific illustrator is harnessing the power of images to communicate science more effectively, especially across linguistic barriers. The friends also discuss Attabey’s AAAS Mass Media Fellowship with Science Friday, and how her work with the Women in Red WikiProject is helping to increase awareness of Latinas in STEM. You can find Attabey on Twitter and Instagram @ScienceBey. You can also learn more about her amazing work on her website at https://science-bey.com/ and at the links below. https://linkedin.com/in/attabeyhttps://www.chembio.umich.edu/https://www.lsi.umich.edu/profiles/alison-narayan-phdhttps://www.lsi.umich.edu/profiles/janet-smith-phdhttps://scholar.google.com/citations?user=_63IT70AAAAJ&hl=en Attabey’s Ultimate Guide for Figure-Making:https://science-bey.com/science-illustration-eng Yale Ciencia Academy Fellows:https://www.cienciapr.org/en/blogs/yale-ciencia-academy/meet-2020-yale-ciencia-academy-fellows AAAS Mass Media Fellows:https://www.aaas.org/programs/mass-media-fellowship/2020-mass-media-fellows Science Friday:https://www.sciencefriday.com/ Women in Red WikiProject:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Women_in_Red Adriana Ocampo:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adriana_Ocampo

57 MINJUN 5
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#49 | Attabey Rodríguez Benítez | Enzymes Where the Party’s At

#48 | Diandra Leslie-Pelecky | The Science Fiction of the Next 5 Minutes

In the final installment of May’s “scientists who sci-fi” series, Jocelyn and Bradley are joined by Dr. Diandra Leslie-Pelecky, who takes us along on her journey from high-school dropout to condensed matter physics Ph.D., nanotechnology researcher, and NASCAR physicist. Diandra tells us how she made the decision to step away from academia to become a full-time writer of genre-bending scientific nonfiction and fiction works, and how her “speculative fiction” approach explores the social, cultural, and ethical aspects of scientific advances that are already underway or are likely to come to fruition in the near future. The friends also discuss how an engagement with storytelling can help scientists to become not only better communicators but also better thinkers. You can find Diandra on Twitter @drdiandra. You can also learn more about her amazing work on her website at https://www.drdiandra.com/ and at the links below. The Physics of NASCAR: https://www.amazon.com/Physics-Nascar-Science-Behind-Speed/dp/0452290228https://www.vox.com/2016/2/19/11065240/daytona-500-2016-nascar-200-mph-physics-drafting-strategy https://youtu.be/bbMCypdr-I4 Science Saturday: She's Got a Ticket to Ride (Jennifer Ouellette & Diandra Leslie-Pelecky):https://youtu.be/cZmf5nS_xrw “Physics is a Survival Skill”: https://youtu.be/rxKLAh977HY Biomedical Applications of Nanotechnology: https://www.amazon.com/Biomedical-Applications-Nanotechnology-Vinod-Labhasetwar/dp/0471722421 Further reading: “Narrative Style Influences Citation Frequency in Climate Change Science,” PLOS ONE: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0167983 Digital Storytelling Lab@ Columbia: http://www.digitalstorytellinglab.com/The Story Grid: https://storygrid.com/books/“A biomimetic eye with a hemispherical perovskite nanowire array retina,” Nature: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2285-xNanodiamonds & nanoparticles for cancer treatment: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5253274/https://phys.org/news/2015-01-nanodiamonds-chemoresistant-cancer-stem-cells.htmlThe End of October: https://www.amazon.com/End-October-novel-Lawrence-Wright/dp/0525658653

73 MINMAY 28
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#48 | Diandra Leslie-Pelecky | The Science Fiction of the Next 5 Minutes

Latest Episodes

#57 | Discussion | Social science: It works, bitches.

What if there were a way for science—the most comprehensive and powerful system we have for making sense of the world—to explain the innermost stirrings of your heart? To teach you how and why you believe what you do, and how to communicate these values more effectively to others? What if science could show us how to build a better, stronger society? Two words, friends: Social sciences. In this sequel to “The scientific method: Is it a thing?”, Jocelyn and Bradley explore the reasons why the social sciences are sometimes marginalized by and within the broader scientific community. They discuss what it means to have a “testable hypothesis,” and how the ideology of reductionism hinders our scientific understanding of complex phenomena. The hosts also point out the questionable, unscientific(!) assumptions that underlie the effort to separate humans from nature, and the human sciences from the so-called natural sciences. Ultimately, this episode showcases the power and promise of the social sciences, arguing that when we view them as separate from and less than “real” science, we do so to the detriment of ALL science. Science is for Everyone (Episode #35): https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/35-discussion-science-is-for-everyone/id1471423633?i=1000466778549 The scientific method: Is it a thing? (Episode #54): https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/54-discussion-the-scientific-method-is-it-a-thing/id1471423633?i=1000485209730 Case control and cohort studies: https://www.students4bestevidence.net/blog/2017/12/06/case-control-and-cohort-studies-overview/ xkcd, “Purity”: https://xkcd.com/435/ xkcd, “Science”: https://xkcd.com/54/ “What Isaac Asimov Taught Us About Predicting the Future”: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/31/books/review/isaac-asimov-psychohistory.html Particles for Justice letter: https://www.particlesforjustice.org/letter “Plandemic and the Seven Traits of Conspiratorial Thinking”: https://youtu.be/Rban0JGEimE Science Communication journal: https://journals.sagepub.com/home/scx

67 MIN2 d ago
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#57 | Discussion | Social science: It works, bitches.

#56 | John Kiat | Fumbling Towards Empathy

What the world needs now is . . . How would you complete the sentence? At a moment in our history so rife with fear, conflict, and suffering, “empathy” might be a leading candidate. But what is empathy, exactly? Is it an innate human experience, or a skill that can learned? And how can science shed light on such an abstract and elusive concept? Jocelyn and Bradley are joined this week by cognitive psychologist Dr. John Kiat, who describes his research into social cognition and shares his perspective on the role of empathy in navigating our current contentious social and political climate, from wearing masks to confronting systemic racism. The friends also discuss the value of the social sciences more generally, and how neuroscience trumped physics in John’s quest to answer the ultimate questions of our existence, which has shaped his science journey. You can learn more about John’s amazing work at https://www.johnkiat.com/ and at the links below: “What’s in a name? Monikers alter empathy in the brain”: https://news.unl.edu/newsrooms/today/article/whats-in-a-name-monikers-alter-empathy-in-the-brain/ “Study shows how brain anticipates social exclusion”: https://news.unl.edu/newsrooms/today/article/study-shows-how-brain-anticipates-social-exclusion/ UC Davis Center for Mind and Brain: https://mindbrain.ucdavis.edu/ Susan Lanzoni, “A Short History of Empathy”: https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/10/a-short-history-of-empathy/409912/ Scott Barry Kaufman, “What Would Happen If Everyone Truly Believed Everything Is One?”: https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/beautiful-minds/what-would-happen-if-everyone-truly-believed-everything-is-one/ Paul Bloom, Against Empathy: The Case for Rational Compassion: https://www.amazon.com/Against-Empathy-Case-Rational-Compassion/dp/0062339338 Viktor Frankl, Man’s Search For Meaning: https://www.amazon.com/Mans-Search-Meaning-Viktor-Frankl/dp/080701429X Robert Sapolsky, Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers: https://www.amazon.com/Why-Zebras-Dont-Ulcers-Third/dp/0805073698

72 MIN1 w ago
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#56 | John Kiat | Fumbling Towards Empathy

#55 | Beata Mierzwa | The Splendor in Our Cells

Think you learned everything you need to know about cell division in middle school? Dr. Beata Mierzwa is here to show you how wonderfully, sublimely, beautifully wrong you are! She joins Jocelyn and Bradley to discuss her work as a molecular biologist, a science artist, and a AAAS IF/THEN Ambassador. She explains how her scientific research is setting the stage for the development of new, specialized cancer therapies, and how she is using the beautiful images produced in her research to design spectacular scientific fashions! The friends discuss how art not only serves as a uniquely powerful means to communicate complex science to diverse audiences, but also helps scientists themselves see and think about their science in new ways. And Beata shares her advice for anyone who might feel “torn between a desire to understand the wonders of life through science or to create beauty with art.” You can find Beata on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook @beatascienceart, and you can learn more about her amazing work at https://beatascienceart.com/ and at the links below: Art the Science blog: https://artthescience.com/blog/2020/04/03/creators-beata-mierzwa/ “Bridging the Divide Between Science and Art,” Journal of Cell Biology: https://rupress.org/jcb/article/217/12/4051/120307/Beata-Mierzwa-Bridging-the-divide-between-science Etsy shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/BeataScienceArt DIY DNA jewelry: https://youtu.be/iiTeVtCneXY https://beatascienceart.com/DNA-jewelry/ Ludwig Cancer Research: https://www.ludwigcancerresearch.org/ The IF/THEN initiative: https://www.ifthencollection.org/beata https://www.ifthenshecan.org/

63 MIN2 w ago
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#55 | Beata Mierzwa | The Splendor in Our Cells

#54 | Discussion | The scientific method: Is it a thing?

In this corner, we have Bradley “Falsify This” Nordell, arguing that science owes its spectacular success to a coherent and unique scientific method . . . [crowd roars] . . . And in this corner, we have Jocelyn “More is More” Bosley, arguing that a plurality of methods makes science stronger, more powerful, and more inclusive! [crowd goes wild] It’s time for a knock-down-drag-out-no-holds-barred-MMA-style brain brawl* to decide the fate of that most cherished of scientific ideals: the scientific method. Do all scientists really follow the same method? Is there more than one way to be “scientific”? If the scientific method is an oversimplification, does it do more harm or good? And in a time when the power and promise of scientific processes are too often contentious and misunderstood, how can we differentiate good science, bad science, pseudoscience, and non-science? In this week’s episode, the hosts take on all these questions and more. *By which, of course, we mean a thoroughly convivial and lighthearted discussion. To learn more, see:https://medium.com/science-coffee/what-is-science-the-scientific-method-in-your-cup-9ae4301acc93A few books on the philosophy of science:Theory & Reality: https://www.amazon.com/Theory-Reality-Introduction-Philosophy-Foundations/dp/0226300633/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=theory+and+reality&qid=1594921702&sr=8-1What is this thing called science? https://www.amazon.com/What-This-Thing-Called-Science/dp/162466038X/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=what+is+this+thing+called+science&qid=1594921736&sr=8-1Philosophy of Science: a very short introduction: https://www.amazon.com/Philosophy-Science-Very-Short-Introduction/dp/0198745583/ref=sr_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=philosophy+of+science&qid=1594921760&sr=8-3Scientific Method in Practice: https://books.google.com/books?id=iVkugqNG9dAC

79 MIN3 w ago
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#54 | Discussion | The scientific method: Is it a thing?

#53 | Sam Illingworth | We Are All Chimeras

. . . Blindly, we turn oureyes to the sky,searching for breadcrumbsbetween the pathways,oblivious to knowledgethat has always been with us:the map of our universeembraced within a single cell.—Sam Illingworth, “Moulded Galaxies” Once upon a time, there was a young lad who wanted to be a scientist. Or a thespian. Or a science communicator. Or a poet. And then one day he realized that he could be all of those things. In fact, he realized he already was all of those things. He was a chimera. And so are you. In this week’s episode, Jocelyn and Bradley are joined by the wondrous, chimerical Dr. Sam Illingworth: scientist, poet, and science communication researcher. Sam shares the fascinating and provocative results of his research into how poetry can promote engagement and effective dialogue between scientists and non-scientists, and how he is putting this knowledge into practice through his peer-reviewed science poetry journal Consilience. He also talks about his latest book, A Sonnet to Science, and what we can learn from prominent figures in the history of science who also wrote poetry. Ultimately, the friends agree that (contrary to Poe’s “Sonnet—To Science,” for which Sam’s book is named) scientific inquiry ramifies rather than detracts from the wonder, awe, and mystery of the natural world. You can find more information about Sam Illingworth here:•Website: https://www.samillingworth.com/•Consilience Website: https://www.consilience-journal.com/•Effective Science Communication: https://iopscience.iop.org/book/978-0-7503-1170-0•Sonnet to Science: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1526127989/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_10?smid=A24GZIC7EIOZVT&psc=1•Effective Science Communication: https://store.ioppublishing.org/page/detail/Effective-Science-Communication-Second-Edition/?k=9780750325189 •Sonnet to Science: https://manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9781526127983/ •Twitter handle: https://twitter.com/samillingworth•Manchester Game Studies Network: https://www.manchestergamestudies.org/•EO Wilson Consilience: https://www.amazon.com/Consilience-Knowledge-Edward-Osborne-Wilson/dp/067976867X•Carbon City Zero https://www.wearepossible.org/carbon-city-zero

50 MINJUL 11
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#53 | Sam Illingworth | We Are All Chimeras

#52 | Alie Ward | Podcastology

Happy birthday to us!!! We’re commemorating one fabulous year of science and friendship, and who better to help us celebrate than ICONIC science podcaster Alie Ward?!? In this episode, our favorite podcastologist shares highlights and insights from her wide-ranging adventures in science communication. Alie explains how her interests in science and in filmmaking converged; how she connects with ologists of all kinds by helping them to identify what gives them “glitter in their stomachs”; and how entertainment media can play an important role in helping to democratize access to science. The friends also discuss the power of not being afraid to embarrass oneself, and the value of “scicommedy” as a strategy for sharing science. It's PARTY TIME!!! You can find Alie on Twitter @alieward. You can also learn more about her amazing work on her website at https://www.alieward.com/ and at the links below. Ologies:https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ologies/id1278815517https://twitter.com/Ologies Did I Mention Invention?https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL15GihUisSLQDWzesFDPVz8WQ-JXOZIxF Innovation Nation: https://www.thehenryford.org/explore/innovation-nation/ Netflix’s Brainchild: https://www.netflix.com/title/80215086 Nerd Brigade: http://nerdbrigade.la/

81 MINJUL 1
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#52 | Alie Ward | Podcastology

#51 | Alice MillerMacPhee | Science of the People

Black Lives Matter. Say Her Name. Defend DACA. Love is Love. How can science help us understand these calls for social justice, and what does it tell us about the movements behind the hashtags? This week, sociologist and Science Slam champion Alice MillerMacPhee talks with Jocelyn and Bradley about her research on the dynamics of social movements, sharing insights into this unique moment in the Movement for Black Lives, immigrant rights movement, and LGBTQ+ rights movement, among others. Alice helps us understand what systemic racism means and how it works, as well as how intersecting inequalities marginalize some identities and experiences more than others. The friends also discuss the sometimes-contested status of the social sciences within the scientific community, and the value of social science research to illuminate the process of science itself. Finally, Alice reflects on how her scholarship and her activism draw inspiration from one another, as she and her merry band of “unruly sociologists” aim to put their knowledge into action. You can follow Alice on Twitter @alicemilmac and learn more about her amazing work at the links below! Alice’s Science Slam presentations:Power to the People! Or, One Researcher’s Path to Science (2016): https://youtu.be/k1ZC_ZhpSOkA Scientist on Activist Terms (2018): https://youtu.be/pywzTp83IzQThere’s a Method for That (2019): https://youtu.be/KDIPvKKWkiw Colleen Ray’s Science Slam, Slamming the Stigma: https://youtu.be/nfKUbiXIsBw More about Science Slams: https://mrsec.unl.edu/science-slamhttps://youtu.be/5xJ8hYxeYUU Unruly Sociologists on Twitter: https://twitter.com/unrulysoc “It Really is Different This Time” (Politico): https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2020/06/04/protest-different-299050 Joe Pinsker, “America is Already Different Than It Was Two Weeks Ago” (The Atlantic): https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2020/06/george-floyd-protests-already-changed/613000/ Dr. Keisha Blain: http://keishablain.com/ Dr. Tressie McMillan Cottom: https://tressiemc.com/ “Ibram Kendi, one of the nation’s leading scholars of racism, says education and love are not the answer” (The Undefeated): https://theundefeated.com/features/ibram-kendi-leading-scholar-of-racism-says-education-and-love-are-not-the-answer/ Dr. Brittney Cooper: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/brief/294191/brittney-cooper Brittney Cooper, “Why Are Black Women and Girls Still an Afterthought in Our Outrage Over Police Violence?” (Time): https://time.com/5847970/police-brutality-black-women-girls/ The #SayHerName campaign: https://aapf.org/sayhername Jocelyn Bosley, “From Monkey Facts to Human Ideologies:...

89 MINJUN 25
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#51 | Alice MillerMacPhee | Science of the People

#50 | Katie Mack | Cosmos: Endgame

We’re marking our 50th episode with a visit from the extraordinary Dr. Katherine (Katie) Mack— known to her more than 350,000 Twitter followers as AstroKatie— who joins Jocelyn and Bradley for a fascinating and surprisingly jovial discussion of the end of the universe. In the words of Randall Munroe, Katie combines “deep thinking about physics and big-picture awe in the style of Carl Sagan,” outlining the possible fates of our cosmos, from Big Crunch to Big Rip to Big Bounce. She explains how “cosmic eschatologists” like her are evaluating the evidence for these competing scenarios, and what dark energy has to do with it. The friends also discuss how cosmological theories inflect the narratives from which humans create meaning, and why we are so emotionally invested in how the universe ends. Finally, Katie shares highlights of her science journey and some crucial insights about science communication. It’s the end of the universe as we know it, and we feel fine! You can find Katie on Twitter @AstroKatie. You can also learn more about her amazing work on her website at http://www.astrokatie.com/ and at the links below. Pre-order The End of Everything (Astrophysically Speaking): http://www.astrokatie.com/book 2018 UNL Science Slam keynote address: https://youtu.be/twws01vxYZw “Disorientation” by Katie Mack: https://youtu.be/2wT1-bRj9wI A Conversation with Katie Mack (The Perimeter Institute): https://youtu.be/q4a1bzrR65Q North Carolina State Leadership in Public Science Cluster: https://facultyclusters.ncsu.edu/clusters/leadership-in-public-science/

80 MINJUN 17
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#50 | Katie Mack | Cosmos: Endgame

#49 | Attabey Rodríguez Benítez | Enzymes Where the Party’s At

If you’ve ever wondered if Beyoncé has a scientific counterpart, wonder no more: it’s Attabey Rodríguez Benítez, a.k.a. Science Bey! Attabey is a chemical biologist and bilingual science communicator with a passion for understanding Nature’s power and sharing it with others. She explains how her research is helping us learn about the many tricks enzymes can do, as well as teaching them novel tricks that can be used in disease therapies. She also shares her journey as a first-generation college student, telling us how her work as a scientific illustrator is harnessing the power of images to communicate science more effectively, especially across linguistic barriers. The friends also discuss Attabey’s AAAS Mass Media Fellowship with Science Friday, and how her work with the Women in Red WikiProject is helping to increase awareness of Latinas in STEM. You can find Attabey on Twitter and Instagram @ScienceBey. You can also learn more about her amazing work on her website at https://science-bey.com/ and at the links below. https://linkedin.com/in/attabeyhttps://www.chembio.umich.edu/https://www.lsi.umich.edu/profiles/alison-narayan-phdhttps://www.lsi.umich.edu/profiles/janet-smith-phdhttps://scholar.google.com/citations?user=_63IT70AAAAJ&hl=en Attabey’s Ultimate Guide for Figure-Making:https://science-bey.com/science-illustration-eng Yale Ciencia Academy Fellows:https://www.cienciapr.org/en/blogs/yale-ciencia-academy/meet-2020-yale-ciencia-academy-fellows AAAS Mass Media Fellows:https://www.aaas.org/programs/mass-media-fellowship/2020-mass-media-fellows Science Friday:https://www.sciencefriday.com/ Women in Red WikiProject:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Women_in_Red Adriana Ocampo:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adriana_Ocampo

57 MINJUN 5
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#49 | Attabey Rodríguez Benítez | Enzymes Where the Party’s At

#48 | Diandra Leslie-Pelecky | The Science Fiction of the Next 5 Minutes

In the final installment of May’s “scientists who sci-fi” series, Jocelyn and Bradley are joined by Dr. Diandra Leslie-Pelecky, who takes us along on her journey from high-school dropout to condensed matter physics Ph.D., nanotechnology researcher, and NASCAR physicist. Diandra tells us how she made the decision to step away from academia to become a full-time writer of genre-bending scientific nonfiction and fiction works, and how her “speculative fiction” approach explores the social, cultural, and ethical aspects of scientific advances that are already underway or are likely to come to fruition in the near future. The friends also discuss how an engagement with storytelling can help scientists to become not only better communicators but also better thinkers. You can find Diandra on Twitter @drdiandra. You can also learn more about her amazing work on her website at https://www.drdiandra.com/ and at the links below. The Physics of NASCAR: https://www.amazon.com/Physics-Nascar-Science-Behind-Speed/dp/0452290228https://www.vox.com/2016/2/19/11065240/daytona-500-2016-nascar-200-mph-physics-drafting-strategy https://youtu.be/bbMCypdr-I4 Science Saturday: She's Got a Ticket to Ride (Jennifer Ouellette & Diandra Leslie-Pelecky):https://youtu.be/cZmf5nS_xrw “Physics is a Survival Skill”: https://youtu.be/rxKLAh977HY Biomedical Applications of Nanotechnology: https://www.amazon.com/Biomedical-Applications-Nanotechnology-Vinod-Labhasetwar/dp/0471722421 Further reading: “Narrative Style Influences Citation Frequency in Climate Change Science,” PLOS ONE: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0167983 Digital Storytelling Lab@ Columbia: http://www.digitalstorytellinglab.com/The Story Grid: https://storygrid.com/books/“A biomimetic eye with a hemispherical perovskite nanowire array retina,” Nature: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2285-xNanodiamonds & nanoparticles for cancer treatment: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5253274/https://phys.org/news/2015-01-nanodiamonds-chemoresistant-cancer-stem-cells.htmlThe End of October: https://www.amazon.com/End-October-novel-Lawrence-Wright/dp/0525658653

73 MINMAY 28
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#48 | Diandra Leslie-Pelecky | The Science Fiction of the Next 5 Minutes
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