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Constant Wonder

BYUradio

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Constant Wonder

Constant Wonder

BYUradio

3
Followers
0
Plays
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Join host Marcus Smith for conversations that invite you to discover, explore, and reengage with the wonders of the world around you. Weekdays at 2p ET/11a PT

Latest Episodes

Prince's Minneapolis, Russian Rock, Imaginary Friends, Science of Friendship

How Minneapolis Shaped Prince's Music Guest:Rashad Shabazz, Associate Professor, School of Social Transformation, Arizona State University Music historians talk a lot about Prince as a genius pioneer of pop music, but they talk less about the city that shaped his music. How much credit can we give the Minneapolis music scene for Prince's success? Smuggling Rock and Roll In and Out of the USSR Guest: Joanna Stingray, American singer-songwriter How an American musician snuck Russian rock and roll out from under the KGB and into the world during the Cold War. Imaginary Friends Guest: Eileen Kennedy-Moore, psychologist and expert on childhood friendship Children often make imaginary friends, but these imaginary friends might have a longer lasting impact than just in childhood. Why is Friendship Biologically Important? Guest:Lydia Denworth, contributing editor for Scientific American, author, "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond" Friendship is extremely important to both health and happiness, so if you want to live a long life, focus on friendships as well as diet, sleep, and exercise.

-1 s6 h ago
Comments
Prince's Minneapolis, Russian Rock, Imaginary Friends, Science of Friendship

Fleeing Shanghai, History of Opium, Albatross Spies, Jellyfish

The Last Boat Out of Shanghai Guest:Helen Zia, activist and author, "Last Boat Out of Shanghai: The Epic Story of the Chinese Who Fled Mao’s Revolution" After 50 years, Zia finally hears the story of her mother's flight from Shanghai as Chairman Mao’s Communist takeover began. Shanghai and Its Demons Guest:Paul French, author, “Midnight in Peking,” and “City of Devils: The Two Men Who Ruled the Underworld of Old Shanghai” Shanghai once was the only city in the world where you could live without a passport. In Shanghai in the 1930s, the rules were few and the opportunities many. The image of Shanghai as a city of jazz, crazy parties, and expatriate splendor is all true, but so is the story of Shanghai’s underworld. History of Opium Guest: David Blistein, co-author with John H. Halpern, "Opium: How an Ancient Flower Shaped and Poisoned our World" Our opioid epidemic is nothing new, as the Chinese could tell you--they fought for years to keep British opium out of their country, ...

-1 s1 d ago
Comments
Fleeing Shanghai, History of Opium, Albatross Spies, Jellyfish

Genuine Fakes, Calling Bull, Presidential Gardens, Casablanca

(Originally Aired on Nov 18, 2019) How Phony Things Teach Us About Real Stuff Guest: Lydia Pyne, author, “Genuine Fakes: How Phony Things Teach Us About Real Stuff” The "Spanish Forger" was quite successful in his or her day, but now the work of the Spanish Forger is collectible for its own value. What we can learn from the success of forgeries. (Originally Aired on Nov 18, 2019) Calling Bull Guests: Jevin West, Assistant Professor, Information, University of Washington; Carl Bergstrom, Professor, Biology, University of Washington Two professors at the University of Washington are on a mission to teach their students, and themselves, how to distinguish truth from fiction online. They started a class together to do just that. (Originally Aired on Jan 10, 2020) History Has Been Growing on Pennsylvania Avenue for a Long Time Guest: Marta McDowell, gardener and author, "All the Presidents' Gardens:Madison's Cabbages to Kennedy's Roses, How the White House Grounds Have Grown with Ameri...

-1 s2 d ago
Comments
Genuine Fakes, Calling Bull, Presidential Gardens, Casablanca

Murdered Spy, History of Ukraine, Great Halifax Explosion, WWI Movies

The Murder of Freddie Woodruff, and One Man’s Extraordinary Search for the Truth Guest:Michael Pullara,attorney and author, “The Spy Who Was Left Behind: Russia, the United States, and the True Story of the Betrayal and Assassination of a CIA Agent” Asthe Cold War was ending, Freddie Woodruff, a CIA agent, was betrayed by the very organization he was spying for. His story was covered up soon after his demise and nobody heard about Freddie Woodruff again, until Texan trial lawyer Michael Pullara jumped on the case, initially to bringclosure to the Woodruffs, family friends from his youth. He later fought for justice for the Georgian man unjustly imprisoned for the murder. The Troubled History of Ukraine Guest:Serhii Plokhii, Professor, Ukrainian History, and Director, Ukrainian Research Institute, Harvard University, author, "The Gates of Europe: A History of Ukraine" Centered in between the Eastern and Western worlds, Ukraine has been subject to internal and external conflict, re...

-1 s5 d ago
Comments
Murdered Spy, History of Ukraine, Great Halifax Explosion, WWI Movies

Therapeutic Communities, Mudlarking, Sewer Guide

Therapeutic Communities Guests:Mike Haws and Alan Fahringer, Directors, Red Barn Farms therapeutic community Drug addicts overwhelm America’s justice system. Therapeutic communities offer aunique solution to the drug crisis. They don't offer doctors or therapists, but, instead, community members help each other take responsibility for their lives and make hard changes. Unearthing History Along the River Thames Guest:Lara Maiklem, author, "Mudlark: In Search of London’s Past Along the River Thames" Most people see garbage on the side of a river and look the other way, but for "mudlarkers" along the River Thames, trash means history. Mudlarking is a tradition that began centuries ago with London’s poor. In search of food, lost coins, or other valuable material, they’d forage along the banks of the river at low tide. Today, it has a more nostalgic value. Mudlarker and author Lara Maiklem weighs in on this historic pastime. Step Down Into the Magnificently Designed Underworld of Sew...

-1 s6 d ago
Comments
Therapeutic Communities, Mudlarking, Sewer Guide

Crime & Brain Injury, CTE & Contact Sports, Oldest Stardust, Solar Storms

Brain Damage and Criminal Behavior Guest:Kim Gorgens, Professor, Graduate School of Professional Psychology, University of Denver Traumatic brain injuries are much more common in prison populations than in the population at large. What does this teach us about rehabilitation and recividivism? CTE and Contact Sports Guest:Kevin Bieniek, Assistant Professor, Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, and Director, Brain Bank, University of Texas Health, Science Center at San Antonio Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease that is caused by repeated brain injury. People often focus on its prevalence in pro-athletes, but new studies show that players of any contact sport are at risk. Stardust Found In an Australian Meteorite Dated Older Than the Solar System Guest:Philipp Heck, Associate Curator of Meteoritics and Polar Studies, Field Museum of Natural History, and Associate Professor, University of Chicago In a small Australian town in 1969, smelly meteorite fragmen...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
Crime & Brain Injury, CTE & Contact Sports, Oldest Stardust, Solar Storms

Nancy Drew, Happy Hollisters, Frankenstein Science, Organoids

Nancy Drew Turns 90! Guest:Jennifer Fisher, Nancy Drew consultant and author, "Clues for Real Life: The Classic Wit & Wisdom of Nancy Drew" Nancy Drew, girl detective, is turning 90 years old in April! Find out how the series' first author was a real-life Nancy Drew herself. The Happy Hollisters Guest:Andrew Svenson III, President, The Svenson Group "The Happy Hollister" books were apopular series of children's mysteries in the 1960s, and The Svenson Group is bringing them back for a new generation. Sam Payne Guest: Sam Payne, host, "The Apple Seed," BYUradio Sam Payneshares his childhood attempt at being a hard-boiled detective writer. The Science Behind the First Science-Fiction Novel Guest:Kathryn Harkup, chemist and author, “Making the Monster: The Science Behind Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein" The years before Mary Shelley published "Frankenstein" saw huge leaps in our understanding of natural sciences, and many of the most popular experiments, lecturers, and science gossip made...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
Nancy Drew, Happy Hollisters, Frankenstein Science, Organoids

Pirates, Russian Five, Miracle on Ice, Underwater Hockey

Swashbuckling Stories of Savage Seamen Guest: Eric Jay Dolin, author, "Black Flags, Blue Waters," and "Leviathan: The History of Whaling in America" Though golden-age pirates are often romanticized by popular culture, a pirate’s life was far less appealing than is often portrayed. Reviewing the actual stories of these storied individuals reveals that their lives were usually nasty, brutish, and short. Pirates, Past and Present Guest: Peter Lehr, author, "Pirates: A New History, from Vikings to Somali Raiders" The late 1600s was the "golden-age" of piracy, but modern pirates are still motivated by the same factors that prompted Blackbeard to terrorize the seas in his day. Outlaw Ocean Guest: Ian Urbina, investigative reporter, "The New York Times," and author, "Outlaw Ocean" There are very few untamed regions left on our planet. Perhaps the most dangerous, unregulated, and least understood are the watery depths of the world’s oceans. Author and journalist Ian Urbina weighs in on th...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
Pirates, Russian Five, Miracle on Ice, Underwater Hockey

History of Drugs, Iridescent Camo, Biomimicry

The Tangled History of Opium(Originally aired 1/31/20) Guest:David Blistein, co-author with John H. Halpern, "Opium: How an Ancient Flower Shaped and Poisoned our World" Our opioid epidemic is nothing new, as the Chinese could tell you--they fought for years to keep British opium out of their country, to no avail. So many cultures have tackled the double-edged sword of opium use. It's relieved more pain than it's caused, according to Blistein, but it certainly has caused a great deal of pain. What can be done about addiction today? Origins of the Global Drug Trade(Originally aired 1/31/20) Guest: Benjamin Breen, Assistant Professor, History, University of California, Santa Cruz How we view drugs is deeply influenced by a complicated history involving colonialism, religion, and science. IridescenceAsCamouflage Guest: Karin Kjernsmo, Behavioural and Evolutionary Ecologist, CamoLab, University of Bristol Have you ever seen an iridescent beetle? They’re pretty noticeable! It turns out ...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
History of Drugs, Iridescent Camo, Biomimicry

Wild Calling, Mongolian Horse, Mole Catching, Swarm Behavior, Tulipmania

What Our Connection to Animals is Really Worth Guest:Richard Louv, author, best-selling “Last Child in the Woods” and “Our Wild Calling: How Connecting with Animals Can Transform Our Lives--and Save Theirs,” journalist, and winner of the Audubon Award Animals have spiritual, mental, and even physical effects on us. And that's a real resource we should preserve. Winning the Mongol Derby Guest: Lara Prior-Palmer, author, "Rough Magic: Riding the World’s Loneliest Horse Race" Lara Prior-Palmer was the first woman, and youngest person ever, to win the Mongol Derby, a 1000-km race through wild Mongolian steppes. This physically harrowing, profound experience fueled an insightful, gripping and candid book, “Rough Magic.” Join us to consider the limits of human endurance, and what drives the soul of a rider. How Catching Moles Helped One Man Find Himself Guest: Marc Hamer, retired mole-catcher, and author, “How To Catch A Mole: Wisdom from a Life Lived in Nature” We can all get a ...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
Wild Calling, Mongolian Horse, Mole Catching, Swarm Behavior, Tulipmania

Latest Episodes

Prince's Minneapolis, Russian Rock, Imaginary Friends, Science of Friendship

How Minneapolis Shaped Prince's Music Guest:Rashad Shabazz, Associate Professor, School of Social Transformation, Arizona State University Music historians talk a lot about Prince as a genius pioneer of pop music, but they talk less about the city that shaped his music. How much credit can we give the Minneapolis music scene for Prince's success? Smuggling Rock and Roll In and Out of the USSR Guest: Joanna Stingray, American singer-songwriter How an American musician snuck Russian rock and roll out from under the KGB and into the world during the Cold War. Imaginary Friends Guest: Eileen Kennedy-Moore, psychologist and expert on childhood friendship Children often make imaginary friends, but these imaginary friends might have a longer lasting impact than just in childhood. Why is Friendship Biologically Important? Guest:Lydia Denworth, contributing editor for Scientific American, author, "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond" Friendship is extremely important to both health and happiness, so if you want to live a long life, focus on friendships as well as diet, sleep, and exercise.

-1 s6 h ago
Comments
Prince's Minneapolis, Russian Rock, Imaginary Friends, Science of Friendship

Fleeing Shanghai, History of Opium, Albatross Spies, Jellyfish

The Last Boat Out of Shanghai Guest:Helen Zia, activist and author, "Last Boat Out of Shanghai: The Epic Story of the Chinese Who Fled Mao’s Revolution" After 50 years, Zia finally hears the story of her mother's flight from Shanghai as Chairman Mao’s Communist takeover began. Shanghai and Its Demons Guest:Paul French, author, “Midnight in Peking,” and “City of Devils: The Two Men Who Ruled the Underworld of Old Shanghai” Shanghai once was the only city in the world where you could live without a passport. In Shanghai in the 1930s, the rules were few and the opportunities many. The image of Shanghai as a city of jazz, crazy parties, and expatriate splendor is all true, but so is the story of Shanghai’s underworld. History of Opium Guest: David Blistein, co-author with John H. Halpern, "Opium: How an Ancient Flower Shaped and Poisoned our World" Our opioid epidemic is nothing new, as the Chinese could tell you--they fought for years to keep British opium out of their country, ...

-1 s1 d ago
Comments
Fleeing Shanghai, History of Opium, Albatross Spies, Jellyfish

Genuine Fakes, Calling Bull, Presidential Gardens, Casablanca

(Originally Aired on Nov 18, 2019) How Phony Things Teach Us About Real Stuff Guest: Lydia Pyne, author, “Genuine Fakes: How Phony Things Teach Us About Real Stuff” The "Spanish Forger" was quite successful in his or her day, but now the work of the Spanish Forger is collectible for its own value. What we can learn from the success of forgeries. (Originally Aired on Nov 18, 2019) Calling Bull Guests: Jevin West, Assistant Professor, Information, University of Washington; Carl Bergstrom, Professor, Biology, University of Washington Two professors at the University of Washington are on a mission to teach their students, and themselves, how to distinguish truth from fiction online. They started a class together to do just that. (Originally Aired on Jan 10, 2020) History Has Been Growing on Pennsylvania Avenue for a Long Time Guest: Marta McDowell, gardener and author, "All the Presidents' Gardens:Madison's Cabbages to Kennedy's Roses, How the White House Grounds Have Grown with Ameri...

-1 s2 d ago
Comments
Genuine Fakes, Calling Bull, Presidential Gardens, Casablanca

Murdered Spy, History of Ukraine, Great Halifax Explosion, WWI Movies

The Murder of Freddie Woodruff, and One Man’s Extraordinary Search for the Truth Guest:Michael Pullara,attorney and author, “The Spy Who Was Left Behind: Russia, the United States, and the True Story of the Betrayal and Assassination of a CIA Agent” Asthe Cold War was ending, Freddie Woodruff, a CIA agent, was betrayed by the very organization he was spying for. His story was covered up soon after his demise and nobody heard about Freddie Woodruff again, until Texan trial lawyer Michael Pullara jumped on the case, initially to bringclosure to the Woodruffs, family friends from his youth. He later fought for justice for the Georgian man unjustly imprisoned for the murder. The Troubled History of Ukraine Guest:Serhii Plokhii, Professor, Ukrainian History, and Director, Ukrainian Research Institute, Harvard University, author, "The Gates of Europe: A History of Ukraine" Centered in between the Eastern and Western worlds, Ukraine has been subject to internal and external conflict, re...

-1 s5 d ago
Comments
Murdered Spy, History of Ukraine, Great Halifax Explosion, WWI Movies

Therapeutic Communities, Mudlarking, Sewer Guide

Therapeutic Communities Guests:Mike Haws and Alan Fahringer, Directors, Red Barn Farms therapeutic community Drug addicts overwhelm America’s justice system. Therapeutic communities offer aunique solution to the drug crisis. They don't offer doctors or therapists, but, instead, community members help each other take responsibility for their lives and make hard changes. Unearthing History Along the River Thames Guest:Lara Maiklem, author, "Mudlark: In Search of London’s Past Along the River Thames" Most people see garbage on the side of a river and look the other way, but for "mudlarkers" along the River Thames, trash means history. Mudlarking is a tradition that began centuries ago with London’s poor. In search of food, lost coins, or other valuable material, they’d forage along the banks of the river at low tide. Today, it has a more nostalgic value. Mudlarker and author Lara Maiklem weighs in on this historic pastime. Step Down Into the Magnificently Designed Underworld of Sew...

-1 s6 d ago
Comments
Therapeutic Communities, Mudlarking, Sewer Guide

Crime & Brain Injury, CTE & Contact Sports, Oldest Stardust, Solar Storms

Brain Damage and Criminal Behavior Guest:Kim Gorgens, Professor, Graduate School of Professional Psychology, University of Denver Traumatic brain injuries are much more common in prison populations than in the population at large. What does this teach us about rehabilitation and recividivism? CTE and Contact Sports Guest:Kevin Bieniek, Assistant Professor, Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, and Director, Brain Bank, University of Texas Health, Science Center at San Antonio Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease that is caused by repeated brain injury. People often focus on its prevalence in pro-athletes, but new studies show that players of any contact sport are at risk. Stardust Found In an Australian Meteorite Dated Older Than the Solar System Guest:Philipp Heck, Associate Curator of Meteoritics and Polar Studies, Field Museum of Natural History, and Associate Professor, University of Chicago In a small Australian town in 1969, smelly meteorite fragmen...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
Crime & Brain Injury, CTE & Contact Sports, Oldest Stardust, Solar Storms

Nancy Drew, Happy Hollisters, Frankenstein Science, Organoids

Nancy Drew Turns 90! Guest:Jennifer Fisher, Nancy Drew consultant and author, "Clues for Real Life: The Classic Wit & Wisdom of Nancy Drew" Nancy Drew, girl detective, is turning 90 years old in April! Find out how the series' first author was a real-life Nancy Drew herself. The Happy Hollisters Guest:Andrew Svenson III, President, The Svenson Group "The Happy Hollister" books were apopular series of children's mysteries in the 1960s, and The Svenson Group is bringing them back for a new generation. Sam Payne Guest: Sam Payne, host, "The Apple Seed," BYUradio Sam Payneshares his childhood attempt at being a hard-boiled detective writer. The Science Behind the First Science-Fiction Novel Guest:Kathryn Harkup, chemist and author, “Making the Monster: The Science Behind Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein" The years before Mary Shelley published "Frankenstein" saw huge leaps in our understanding of natural sciences, and many of the most popular experiments, lecturers, and science gossip made...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
Nancy Drew, Happy Hollisters, Frankenstein Science, Organoids

Pirates, Russian Five, Miracle on Ice, Underwater Hockey

Swashbuckling Stories of Savage Seamen Guest: Eric Jay Dolin, author, "Black Flags, Blue Waters," and "Leviathan: The History of Whaling in America" Though golden-age pirates are often romanticized by popular culture, a pirate’s life was far less appealing than is often portrayed. Reviewing the actual stories of these storied individuals reveals that their lives were usually nasty, brutish, and short. Pirates, Past and Present Guest: Peter Lehr, author, "Pirates: A New History, from Vikings to Somali Raiders" The late 1600s was the "golden-age" of piracy, but modern pirates are still motivated by the same factors that prompted Blackbeard to terrorize the seas in his day. Outlaw Ocean Guest: Ian Urbina, investigative reporter, "The New York Times," and author, "Outlaw Ocean" There are very few untamed regions left on our planet. Perhaps the most dangerous, unregulated, and least understood are the watery depths of the world’s oceans. Author and journalist Ian Urbina weighs in on th...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
Pirates, Russian Five, Miracle on Ice, Underwater Hockey

History of Drugs, Iridescent Camo, Biomimicry

The Tangled History of Opium(Originally aired 1/31/20) Guest:David Blistein, co-author with John H. Halpern, "Opium: How an Ancient Flower Shaped and Poisoned our World" Our opioid epidemic is nothing new, as the Chinese could tell you--they fought for years to keep British opium out of their country, to no avail. So many cultures have tackled the double-edged sword of opium use. It's relieved more pain than it's caused, according to Blistein, but it certainly has caused a great deal of pain. What can be done about addiction today? Origins of the Global Drug Trade(Originally aired 1/31/20) Guest: Benjamin Breen, Assistant Professor, History, University of California, Santa Cruz How we view drugs is deeply influenced by a complicated history involving colonialism, religion, and science. IridescenceAsCamouflage Guest: Karin Kjernsmo, Behavioural and Evolutionary Ecologist, CamoLab, University of Bristol Have you ever seen an iridescent beetle? They’re pretty noticeable! It turns out ...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
History of Drugs, Iridescent Camo, Biomimicry

Wild Calling, Mongolian Horse, Mole Catching, Swarm Behavior, Tulipmania

What Our Connection to Animals is Really Worth Guest:Richard Louv, author, best-selling “Last Child in the Woods” and “Our Wild Calling: How Connecting with Animals Can Transform Our Lives--and Save Theirs,” journalist, and winner of the Audubon Award Animals have spiritual, mental, and even physical effects on us. And that's a real resource we should preserve. Winning the Mongol Derby Guest: Lara Prior-Palmer, author, "Rough Magic: Riding the World’s Loneliest Horse Race" Lara Prior-Palmer was the first woman, and youngest person ever, to win the Mongol Derby, a 1000-km race through wild Mongolian steppes. This physically harrowing, profound experience fueled an insightful, gripping and candid book, “Rough Magic.” Join us to consider the limits of human endurance, and what drives the soul of a rider. How Catching Moles Helped One Man Find Himself Guest: Marc Hamer, retired mole-catcher, and author, “How To Catch A Mole: Wisdom from a Life Lived in Nature” We can all get a ...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
Wild Calling, Mongolian Horse, Mole Catching, Swarm Behavior, Tulipmania
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