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Coder Radio

Jupiter Broadcasting

20
Followers
60
Plays
Coder Radio

Coder Radio

Jupiter Broadcasting

20
Followers
60
Plays
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About Us

A weekly talk show taking a pragmatic look at the art and business of Software Development and related technologies.

Latest Episodes

375: The Grey Havens

We say goodbye to the show by taking a look back at a few of our favorite moments and reflect on how much has changed in the past seven years.Links:Coder Radio Back Catalog Coder Radio - A New Developer Podcast! — A weekly talk show taking a pragmatic look at the art and business of software development and related technologies.WWDC Fallout | Coder Radio 2 — Michael and Chris cover the items from WWDC that they think developers will be impacted by, discuss the Facebook pressure, and reflect on hardware updates announced. Docker All The Things | Coder Radio 66 — We’re joined by two gentlemen from dotCloud, the folks behind Docker. We chat about what Docker is best at, how far out the 1.0 release is, the projects use of Go, the future of Docker, and much more. Open Season on Swift | Coder Radio 182 — The majority of our discussion this week is around the open sourcing of Swift, what Apple got really right & what areas still really need improvement.Clojure Calisthenics | Coder Rad...

33 MIN2019 SEP 17
Comments
375: The Grey Havens

374: Python's Long Tail

As Python 2's demise draws near we reflect on Python's popularity, the growing adoption of static typing, and why the Python 3 transition took so long. Plus Apple's audacious app store tactics, Google's troubles with Typescript, and more!Links:Correction: macOS and Zsh — I believe the new macOS Catalina shell is zsh.Feedback: What about Perl 6? — Last episode (373) that's on about shell scripting, interpreted languages, repl & cli, made me think about Perl 6.Feedback: Pry and a Pick — In the previous episode I was amazed to hear that Mike had never used pry before! It's one of the first things I show off to people when introducing them to Ruby.Feedback: Learning Web Dev — I feel woefully unready and I was wondering if either of you had suggestions for structured content around web dev/design that I could use to augment my learning? I've been using Pluralsight, which is great, and I'd be curious to know what else you might suggest. Google feedback on TypeScript 3.5 — We know and...

33 MIN2019 SEP 10
Comments
374: Python's Long Tail

373: Interactive Investigations

We debate the best way to package scripting language apps then explore interactive development and the importance of a good shell. Plus npm bans terminal ads, what comes after Rust, and why Mike hates macros.Links:Feedback: Getting started on .NET? — My question is what is the easiest route to get started in .net development? When I looked online there are several different languages that can be used from C# ,F#, ASP.NEt among others. In your personal experience what is the easiest way to get started on this path?Feedback: Questioning Rust — [...] The primary issue here is that most of the work to prove that safety (beyond "trust me" blocks) is pushed onto the developer instead of having the compiler insert protections surmised from uses of the data structures outlined in the source code. After all, it can only prove what it is shown, not what it assumes.Feedback on Mike and Macros — I'd also love to hear more about what you dislike about macros. Personally, I view Rust's macro s...

36 MIN2019 SEP 3
Comments
373: Interactive Investigations

372: Crystal Clear

We're back and going crazy about Crystal, a statically typed language that's as fast as C and as slick as ruby. Plus an update on Rails 6, Intel's growing adoption of Rust, and the challenge of making breaking changes.Links:Feedback: Academia and Industry — Do either of you have any insights as to how the software development community would view someone with a math PhD, but no industry coding experience as a job applicant? Any advice would be appreciated. Feedback: Absurd Abstractions — FYI about wanting `interface` in Python: they are called abstract base classes. Check out the standard library module, abc for that and collections.abc some useful predefined container interfaces. Feedback: Breaking Changes — I developed a niche Python package that has some user following in the network security realm. I’m at a crossroads though as a change I want to make will subtly break scripts that worked in previous/current versions. The end result of my pending change is good for the proje...

54 MIN2019 AUG 27
Comments
372: Crystal Clear

371: Absurd Abstractions

It’s a Coder Radio special all about abstraction. What it is, why we need it, and what to do when it leaks. Plus your feedback, Mike’s next language challenge, and a functional ruby pick.Links:Feedback: Clojure, Racket, and Extempore — Thinking about the problem could take the form of leveraging the REPL to work out code to solve a problem or you could spend some time away from your computer screen (or in “Hammock Time”) working out problems. If I have learned anything from Clojure’s creator, “Rich Hickey” its “Programming is not about not about typing, it’s about thinking”.Knuth's Sensitivity Conjecture One-PagerLaw Of Leaky Abstractions — All non-trivial abstractions, to some degree, are leaky.The Law of Leaky Abstractions – Joel on Software — This is what I call a leaky abstraction. TCP attempts to provide a complete abstraction of an underlying unreliable network, but sometimes, the network leaks through the abstraction and you feel the things that the abstraction ...

39 MIN2019 AUG 20
Comments
371: Absurd Abstractions

370: F'ing #

Things get heated when it’s time for Wes to check-in on Mike’s functional favorite, F#, and share his journey exploring modern .NET on Linux. Plus your feedback, combining ruby and rust, and the latest scandal with JEDI.Links:Emacs Feedback from DJ — Another point for the show is a soft intro to functional programming. Wes mentioned Emacs because of the packages supporting Clojure development when he started with that. Elisp seems to be fairly intuitive and well documented, as a little functional language its own right (correct me if I'm wrong)--this makes for a soft intro to FP. Most of my coding has been in the space of embedded systems and low-level languages--not much functional programming to be had. This show has gotten me curious about FP, which is quite old in concept, and getting implemented nicely in modern languages. For me, I still rely heavily on special Vim keys that are not mapped in evil-mode, which causes some paper cuts. However, elisp makes it easy to customize...

44 MIN2019 AUG 13
Comments
370: F'ing #

369: Old Man Embraces Cloud

Chris finally gets excited about Docker just as Wes tells him it’s time to learn something new. Plus the state of browser extension development, the value of non-technical advice, and your feedback.Links:Feedback: good mic for voice recording? — I'm looking for a good mic for voice recording since I will be a guest on a podcast soon. Since you sound good in your shows, can you share what mics you are using? Amazon.com: Audio-Technica ATR2500-USB Cardioid Condenser USB Microphone: Musical Instruments — Side-address condenser microphone with USB output for easy connection to your computer.Google and Mozilla are failing to support browser extension developers · Armin Sebastian — We are witnessing the failure of browser vendors to recognize the value of our labor and the important role it plays in a healthy browser ecosystem. Half of all Google Chrome extensions have fewer than 16 installs — All in all, about 50% of all Chrome extensions have fewer than 16 installs, meaning that h...

49 MIN2019 AUG 6
Comments
369: Old Man Embraces Cloud

368: Clojure Clash

Mike and Wes debate the merits and aesthetics of Clojure in this week's rowdy language check-in. Plus why everyone's talking about the sensitivity conjecture, speedy TLS with rust, and more!Links:Feedback: Which Language To Use And Why? — There are so many languages out there, and I just don’t understand when or why you would want to use a language over another.Mathematician Solves Computer Science Conjecture in Two Pages | Quanta Magazine — This “sensitivity” conjecture has stumped many of the most prominent computer scientists over the years, yet the new proof is so simple that one researcher summed it up in a single tweet.ELI5: The Sensitivity Conjecture has been solved. What is it about? — Think of it like a Buzzfeed quiz. You answer a bunch of multiple-choice input questions about seemingly random topics ('What's your favourite breakfast cereal?', 'What's your favourite classic movie?', 'What did you want to be when you grew up?', and so on), and you get a response back a...

43 MIN2019 JUL 30
Comments
368: Clojure Clash

367: 10x Evilgineers

Mike rekindles his youthful love affair with Emacs and we debate what makes a "10x engineer". Plus the latest Play store revolt and some of your feedback.Links:Feedback on Coder Radio 366 — As a C++ developer working on a large, primarily OO codebase, I’ve been writing ever more C++ as “just a pipeline of data transformations.” As you guys mentioned, you can get a lot of benefit even in an OO situation from wrapping a functional “core” up in an object “package.”Functional Core, Imperative Shell — In this screencast we look at one method for crossing this divide. We review a Twitter client whose core is functional: managing tweets, syncing timelines to incoming Twitter API data, remembering cursor positions within the tweet list, and rendering tweets to text for display. This functional core is surrounded by a shell of imperative code: it manipulates stdin, stdout, the database, and the network, all based on values produced by the functional core. Postmodern immutable data s...

34 MIN2019 JUL 23
Comments
367: 10x Evilgineers

366: Functional First

It’s a Coder Radio special as Mike and Wes dive into functional programming in the real world and share their tips for applying FP techniques in any language.Links:Porting Redis to WebAssembly with Clang/WASI — In this post, we share our experience of porting an existing open-source software package — the data structure server Redis — to WebAssembly. While this is not the first time that Redis has been ported to Wasm (see this port by Sergey Rublev), it is the first time to our knowledge that the obtained port can be run deterministically.Solving Problems the Clojure Way - Rafal Dittwald — It is said that Clojure is a "functional" programming language; there's also talk of "data-driven" programming. What are these things? Are they any good? Why are they good? In this talk, Rafal attempts to distill the particular blend of functional and data-driven programming that makes up "idiomatic Clojure", clarify what it looks like in practise (with real-world examples), and reflect on ho...

38 MIN2019 JUL 17
Comments
366: Functional First

Latest Episodes

375: The Grey Havens

We say goodbye to the show by taking a look back at a few of our favorite moments and reflect on how much has changed in the past seven years.Links:Coder Radio Back Catalog Coder Radio - A New Developer Podcast! — A weekly talk show taking a pragmatic look at the art and business of software development and related technologies.WWDC Fallout | Coder Radio 2 — Michael and Chris cover the items from WWDC that they think developers will be impacted by, discuss the Facebook pressure, and reflect on hardware updates announced. Docker All The Things | Coder Radio 66 — We’re joined by two gentlemen from dotCloud, the folks behind Docker. We chat about what Docker is best at, how far out the 1.0 release is, the projects use of Go, the future of Docker, and much more. Open Season on Swift | Coder Radio 182 — The majority of our discussion this week is around the open sourcing of Swift, what Apple got really right & what areas still really need improvement.Clojure Calisthenics | Coder Rad...

33 MIN2019 SEP 17
Comments
375: The Grey Havens

374: Python's Long Tail

As Python 2's demise draws near we reflect on Python's popularity, the growing adoption of static typing, and why the Python 3 transition took so long. Plus Apple's audacious app store tactics, Google's troubles with Typescript, and more!Links:Correction: macOS and Zsh — I believe the new macOS Catalina shell is zsh.Feedback: What about Perl 6? — Last episode (373) that's on about shell scripting, interpreted languages, repl & cli, made me think about Perl 6.Feedback: Pry and a Pick — In the previous episode I was amazed to hear that Mike had never used pry before! It's one of the first things I show off to people when introducing them to Ruby.Feedback: Learning Web Dev — I feel woefully unready and I was wondering if either of you had suggestions for structured content around web dev/design that I could use to augment my learning? I've been using Pluralsight, which is great, and I'd be curious to know what else you might suggest. Google feedback on TypeScript 3.5 — We know and...

33 MIN2019 SEP 10
Comments
374: Python's Long Tail

373: Interactive Investigations

We debate the best way to package scripting language apps then explore interactive development and the importance of a good shell. Plus npm bans terminal ads, what comes after Rust, and why Mike hates macros.Links:Feedback: Getting started on .NET? — My question is what is the easiest route to get started in .net development? When I looked online there are several different languages that can be used from C# ,F#, ASP.NEt among others. In your personal experience what is the easiest way to get started on this path?Feedback: Questioning Rust — [...] The primary issue here is that most of the work to prove that safety (beyond "trust me" blocks) is pushed onto the developer instead of having the compiler insert protections surmised from uses of the data structures outlined in the source code. After all, it can only prove what it is shown, not what it assumes.Feedback on Mike and Macros — I'd also love to hear more about what you dislike about macros. Personally, I view Rust's macro s...

36 MIN2019 SEP 3
Comments
373: Interactive Investigations

372: Crystal Clear

We're back and going crazy about Crystal, a statically typed language that's as fast as C and as slick as ruby. Plus an update on Rails 6, Intel's growing adoption of Rust, and the challenge of making breaking changes.Links:Feedback: Academia and Industry — Do either of you have any insights as to how the software development community would view someone with a math PhD, but no industry coding experience as a job applicant? Any advice would be appreciated. Feedback: Absurd Abstractions — FYI about wanting `interface` in Python: they are called abstract base classes. Check out the standard library module, abc for that and collections.abc some useful predefined container interfaces. Feedback: Breaking Changes — I developed a niche Python package that has some user following in the network security realm. I’m at a crossroads though as a change I want to make will subtly break scripts that worked in previous/current versions. The end result of my pending change is good for the proje...

54 MIN2019 AUG 27
Comments
372: Crystal Clear

371: Absurd Abstractions

It’s a Coder Radio special all about abstraction. What it is, why we need it, and what to do when it leaks. Plus your feedback, Mike’s next language challenge, and a functional ruby pick.Links:Feedback: Clojure, Racket, and Extempore — Thinking about the problem could take the form of leveraging the REPL to work out code to solve a problem or you could spend some time away from your computer screen (or in “Hammock Time”) working out problems. If I have learned anything from Clojure’s creator, “Rich Hickey” its “Programming is not about not about typing, it’s about thinking”.Knuth's Sensitivity Conjecture One-PagerLaw Of Leaky Abstractions — All non-trivial abstractions, to some degree, are leaky.The Law of Leaky Abstractions – Joel on Software — This is what I call a leaky abstraction. TCP attempts to provide a complete abstraction of an underlying unreliable network, but sometimes, the network leaks through the abstraction and you feel the things that the abstraction ...

39 MIN2019 AUG 20
Comments
371: Absurd Abstractions

370: F'ing #

Things get heated when it’s time for Wes to check-in on Mike’s functional favorite, F#, and share his journey exploring modern .NET on Linux. Plus your feedback, combining ruby and rust, and the latest scandal with JEDI.Links:Emacs Feedback from DJ — Another point for the show is a soft intro to functional programming. Wes mentioned Emacs because of the packages supporting Clojure development when he started with that. Elisp seems to be fairly intuitive and well documented, as a little functional language its own right (correct me if I'm wrong)--this makes for a soft intro to FP. Most of my coding has been in the space of embedded systems and low-level languages--not much functional programming to be had. This show has gotten me curious about FP, which is quite old in concept, and getting implemented nicely in modern languages. For me, I still rely heavily on special Vim keys that are not mapped in evil-mode, which causes some paper cuts. However, elisp makes it easy to customize...

44 MIN2019 AUG 13
Comments
370: F'ing #

369: Old Man Embraces Cloud

Chris finally gets excited about Docker just as Wes tells him it’s time to learn something new. Plus the state of browser extension development, the value of non-technical advice, and your feedback.Links:Feedback: good mic for voice recording? — I'm looking for a good mic for voice recording since I will be a guest on a podcast soon. Since you sound good in your shows, can you share what mics you are using? Amazon.com: Audio-Technica ATR2500-USB Cardioid Condenser USB Microphone: Musical Instruments — Side-address condenser microphone with USB output for easy connection to your computer.Google and Mozilla are failing to support browser extension developers · Armin Sebastian — We are witnessing the failure of browser vendors to recognize the value of our labor and the important role it plays in a healthy browser ecosystem. Half of all Google Chrome extensions have fewer than 16 installs — All in all, about 50% of all Chrome extensions have fewer than 16 installs, meaning that h...

49 MIN2019 AUG 6
Comments
369: Old Man Embraces Cloud

368: Clojure Clash

Mike and Wes debate the merits and aesthetics of Clojure in this week's rowdy language check-in. Plus why everyone's talking about the sensitivity conjecture, speedy TLS with rust, and more!Links:Feedback: Which Language To Use And Why? — There are so many languages out there, and I just don’t understand when or why you would want to use a language over another.Mathematician Solves Computer Science Conjecture in Two Pages | Quanta Magazine — This “sensitivity” conjecture has stumped many of the most prominent computer scientists over the years, yet the new proof is so simple that one researcher summed it up in a single tweet.ELI5: The Sensitivity Conjecture has been solved. What is it about? — Think of it like a Buzzfeed quiz. You answer a bunch of multiple-choice input questions about seemingly random topics ('What's your favourite breakfast cereal?', 'What's your favourite classic movie?', 'What did you want to be when you grew up?', and so on), and you get a response back a...

43 MIN2019 JUL 30
Comments
368: Clojure Clash

367: 10x Evilgineers

Mike rekindles his youthful love affair with Emacs and we debate what makes a "10x engineer". Plus the latest Play store revolt and some of your feedback.Links:Feedback on Coder Radio 366 — As a C++ developer working on a large, primarily OO codebase, I’ve been writing ever more C++ as “just a pipeline of data transformations.” As you guys mentioned, you can get a lot of benefit even in an OO situation from wrapping a functional “core” up in an object “package.”Functional Core, Imperative Shell — In this screencast we look at one method for crossing this divide. We review a Twitter client whose core is functional: managing tweets, syncing timelines to incoming Twitter API data, remembering cursor positions within the tweet list, and rendering tweets to text for display. This functional core is surrounded by a shell of imperative code: it manipulates stdin, stdout, the database, and the network, all based on values produced by the functional core. Postmodern immutable data s...

34 MIN2019 JUL 23
Comments
367: 10x Evilgineers

366: Functional First

It’s a Coder Radio special as Mike and Wes dive into functional programming in the real world and share their tips for applying FP techniques in any language.Links:Porting Redis to WebAssembly with Clang/WASI — In this post, we share our experience of porting an existing open-source software package — the data structure server Redis — to WebAssembly. While this is not the first time that Redis has been ported to Wasm (see this port by Sergey Rublev), it is the first time to our knowledge that the obtained port can be run deterministically.Solving Problems the Clojure Way - Rafal Dittwald — It is said that Clojure is a "functional" programming language; there's also talk of "data-driven" programming. What are these things? Are they any good? Why are they good? In this talk, Rafal attempts to distill the particular blend of functional and data-driven programming that makes up "idiomatic Clojure", clarify what it looks like in practise (with real-world examples), and reflect on ho...

38 MIN2019 JUL 17
Comments
366: Functional First
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