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The New Stack Context

The New Stack

10
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The New Stack Context

The New Stack Context

The New Stack

10
Followers
3
Plays
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About Us

Join The New Stack’s editorial team to review the week’s hottest news in cloud-native technologies and at-scale application development. Editorial Director Libby Clark, Managing Editor Joab Jackson and TNS Founder and Publisher Alex Williams put more context around the stories we’re covering each week and look ahead to topics we expect will gain more attention in coming weeks. Guests include TNS writers and correspondents who join us to discuss what they’re hearing from tech industry insiders.

Latest Episodes

Context 134 : The CNCF Technology Radar Evaluates Observability Tools

Application and system observability was the focus of the latest Cloud Native Computing Foundation Technology Radar end user survey, posted last week. So for this week’s TNS Context podcast episode, we invited Cheryl Hung, CNCF vice president of ecosystem, to discuss these latest findings. To get an additional industry perspective on observability, we’ve also invited Buddy Brewer, vice president of full stack observability for New Relic.

32 min2 d ago
Comments
Context 134 : The CNCF Technology Radar Evaluates Observability Tools

Episode 133: Crossplane - A Kubernetes Control Plane to Roll Your Own PaaS

The ideal state of a cloud native shop is to run a development and deployment pipeline that can seamlessly move applications from the developer’s laptop to the data center (or the edge) without any manual intervention. And while there are many tools available to facilitate such automation — Helm, Operators, CI/CD toolchains, GitOps architectures, Infrastructure-as-Code tools such as Terraform — all too often edge cases and exceptions still require personal attention, bringing DevOps pipelines to a halt. The missing pieces of the puzzles are a control plane and a unified application model for the control plane to run upon, asserted Phil Prasek, a principal product manager at Upbound, in this latest episode of The New Stack Context podcast. Prasek envisions a time when organizations can build their own customized set of platform services, where developers can draw from a self-serve portal the building blocks they need — be they containerized applications or third party cloud services, and have the resulting app run uniformly in multiple environments. “Within an enterprise control plane, you can basically have your own abstractions, and then you can publish them,” Prasek said. TNS Editorial and Marketing Director Libby Clark hosts this episode, with the help of TNS Senior Editor Richard MacManus, and TNS Managing Editor Joab Jackson.

31 min1 w ago
Comments
Episode 133: Crossplane - A Kubernetes Control Plane to Roll Your Own PaaS

Episode 132: Darren Shepard of Rancher - Who Needs Kubernetes Operators Anyway?

Late last month, Rancher Labs donated its popular K3s Kubernetes distribution to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. This stripped down version of Kubernetes has been a quiet hit among cloud native users — many who are deploying to edge environs. So for this week’s episode of The New Stack Context podcast, we invited Rancher Co-Founder Darren Shepherd to discuss what Rancher is seeing in the cloud native ecosystem. Rancher is in the process of being acquired by SUSE and, because the deal is still pending, Darren could not comment but he did chat about K3s, as well as Kubernetes. The New Stack Editorial and Marketing Director Libby Clark hosted this episode, alongside TNS Senior Editor Richard MacManus, and TNS Managing Editor Joab Jackson.

30 min2 w ago
Comments
Episode 132: Darren Shepard of Rancher - Who Needs Kubernetes Operators Anyway?

Episode 131: in-Memory Computing Meets Cloud Native Computing

For this week’s episode, we spoke with Mike Yawn, a senior solution architect at Hazelcast, about the potential of in-memory computing to supercharge microservices and cloud native workloads. Yawn recently contributed a post to TNS explaining how an in-memory technologies could make microservices run more smoothly. Hazelcast offers an in-memory data grid, Hazelcast IMDG, along with stream processing software Hazelcast Jet. We wanted to know more about how in-memory could be used with microservices. While in-memory offers caching just like key-value database such as Redis, it also offers additional computing capacity, which can help process that data on the fly, Yawn explained.

32 min3 w ago
Comments
Episode 131: in-Memory Computing Meets Cloud Native Computing

Episode 130: KubeCon EU and the Zombie Workloads

Welcome to The New Stack Context, a podcast where we discuss the latest news and perspectives in the world of cloud native computing. For this week’s episode, we spoke with Pratik Wadher, vice president of product development at Intuit, to discuss the company’s experience as a Kubernetes end user, as well as its involvement in the Argo Flux project — a single toolchain for continuous deployment and automated workflows using GitOps. We also share our experiences of attending KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU 2020, held this week “virtually.” The New Stack editorial and marketing director Libby Clark hosted this episode, alongside TNS Publisher Alex Williams, TNS senior editor Richard MacManus, and TNS managing editor Joab Jackson.

38 minAUG 22
Comments
Episode 130: KubeCon EU and the Zombie Workloads

Episode 129 : Kubernetes 2020, by the Numbers

The New Stack has just released an updated eBook on Kubernetes, “The State of the Kubernetes Ecosystem,” and so this week on The New Stack Context podcast, we’ve invited TNS analyst Lawrence Hecht to discuss some of the analysis he did for this volume. We covered Kubernetes adoption in the cloud, storage and networking concerns and the changing DevOps culture around cloud native computing. At the end of the podcast, we also discuss what to expect from next week’s KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe virtual conference. The New Stack Senior Editor Richard MacManus hosted this episode, with the help of Joab Jackson, TNS managing editor, and Alex Williams, founder and publisher of The New Stack.

38 minAUG 15
Comments
Episode 129 : Kubernetes 2020, by the Numbers

Episode 128: Operators Can Be a Security Hazard

A few years back, Kubernetes was in full development and many of its basic concepts were still evolving, so security was not a huge priority. But as K8s deployments have moved into production, more attention is being focused in securing Kubernetes and its workloads. Gadi Naor has been following Kubernetes security from the start. Alcide, the company Naor founded and now serves as CTO, offers an end-to-end Kubernetes security platform. For this week’s episode of The New Stack Context podcast, we speak with Naor about a variety of Kubernetes security-related topics. Last week, Naor hosted a Kubernetes security Webinar for the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, which in addition to offering many helpful hints, discussed in detail the spate of recent vulnerabilities found in Kubernetes. And for The New Stack, he wrote about the problem about configuration drift in Kubernetes, and why it can’t be solved simply through continuous integration tools. TNS Editorial and Marketing director Libby Clark hosted this episode, alongside TNS Senior Editor Richard MacManus, and TNS Managing Editor Joab Jackson.

35 minAUG 1
Comments
Episode 128: Operators Can Be a Security Hazard

Episode 127: Serverless Web Content Delivery with JAMstack

There is a new architecture for front-end web development: JAMStack rethinks the current server-browser architecture, freeing the developer from worrying about fiddling with Apache, Linux or other aspects of backend support. For this week’s episode of the The New Stack Context podcast, we speak with Guillermo Rauch, founder and CEO of Vercel, which offers a JAMstack-based service that allows developers to simply push their code to git in order to update their web site or application. Key to this platform is an open source user interface framework created by Rauch, called Next.js, based on Facebook’s React, but tweaked to make it easier to build user interfaces not only for the developer but even for the designer. TNS Editorial and Marketing Director Libby Clark hosted this episode, alongside TNS Senior Editor Richard MacManus, and TNS Managing Editor Joab Jackson. On the benefit of using a managed JAMstack such as Vercel’s (over a traditional LAMP stack), Rauch noted that: You can deploy to an essentially serverless infrastructure, right? I always tell people that content delivery networks were the OG serverless — because they never required management. They were perfectly delegated. It’s a globally distributed system with no single point of failure. You’re not going to have to worry about Linux and Apache because you can deploy to any distributed global network that can serve essentially markup, JavaScript, CSS and static files. Then obviously to power the API, server rendering and more advanced functionality, the Vercel network gives you serverless functions. So we try to complete the entire JAMstack equation.

41 minJUL 25
Comments
Episode 127: Serverless Web Content Delivery with JAMstack

Episode 126: Denise Gosnell, DataStax - How Many Database Joins Are Too Many?

Welcome to The New Stack Context, a podcast where we discuss the latest news and perspectives in the world of cloud native computing. For this week’s episode, we spoke with Denise Gosnell, chief data officer at Datastax, who is a co-author of the O’Reilly book “A Practitioner’s Guide to Graph Data.” She also graciously wrote a post for us explaining why graph databases are gaining traction in the enterprise. TNS editorial and marketing director Libby Clark hosted this episode, alongside TNS senior editor Richard MacManus, and TNS managing editor Joab Jackson. Graph database systems differ from the standard relational (SQL) kind in that they are engineered to more easily capture the relations across different entities. “When you’re looking at your databases, graph databases allow you to model your data more efficiently by using relationships,” Gosnell said. You could capture that relationship information through a series of database joins of separate tables, but eventually, t...

33 minJUL 18
Comments
Episode 126: Denise Gosnell, DataStax - How Many Database Joins Are Too Many?

Episode 125: Chris DiBona - Google Launches a Trademark Office for Open Source

Welcome to The New Stack Context, a podcast where we discuss the latest news and perspectives in the world of cloud native computing. For this week’s episode, we spoke with Chris DiBona, director of open source at Google, about Google’s launch of the Open Usage Commons, an independent company to help open source projects better manage their trademarks. In a blog post, DiBona notes that trademarks sit at the juncture of the rule-of-law and the philosophy of open source. So for this episode, we wanted to find out more about how they interact and how Google is attempting to improve the management of trademarks in an open source way. We also wanted to address the rumors that this organization was created to manage Google’s Istio open source service mesh in lieu of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (DiBona’s answer: no). TNS editorial and marketing director Libby Clark hosted this episode, alongside TNS senior editor Richard MacManus, and TNS managing editor Joab Jackson.

32 minJUL 11
Comments
Episode 125: Chris DiBona - Google Launches a Trademark Office for Open Source

Latest Episodes

Context 134 : The CNCF Technology Radar Evaluates Observability Tools

Application and system observability was the focus of the latest Cloud Native Computing Foundation Technology Radar end user survey, posted last week. So for this week’s TNS Context podcast episode, we invited Cheryl Hung, CNCF vice president of ecosystem, to discuss these latest findings. To get an additional industry perspective on observability, we’ve also invited Buddy Brewer, vice president of full stack observability for New Relic.

32 min2 d ago
Comments
Context 134 : The CNCF Technology Radar Evaluates Observability Tools

Episode 133: Crossplane - A Kubernetes Control Plane to Roll Your Own PaaS

The ideal state of a cloud native shop is to run a development and deployment pipeline that can seamlessly move applications from the developer’s laptop to the data center (or the edge) without any manual intervention. And while there are many tools available to facilitate such automation — Helm, Operators, CI/CD toolchains, GitOps architectures, Infrastructure-as-Code tools such as Terraform — all too often edge cases and exceptions still require personal attention, bringing DevOps pipelines to a halt. The missing pieces of the puzzles are a control plane and a unified application model for the control plane to run upon, asserted Phil Prasek, a principal product manager at Upbound, in this latest episode of The New Stack Context podcast. Prasek envisions a time when organizations can build their own customized set of platform services, where developers can draw from a self-serve portal the building blocks they need — be they containerized applications or third party cloud services, and have the resulting app run uniformly in multiple environments. “Within an enterprise control plane, you can basically have your own abstractions, and then you can publish them,” Prasek said. TNS Editorial and Marketing Director Libby Clark hosts this episode, with the help of TNS Senior Editor Richard MacManus, and TNS Managing Editor Joab Jackson.

31 min1 w ago
Comments
Episode 133: Crossplane - A Kubernetes Control Plane to Roll Your Own PaaS

Episode 132: Darren Shepard of Rancher - Who Needs Kubernetes Operators Anyway?

Late last month, Rancher Labs donated its popular K3s Kubernetes distribution to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. This stripped down version of Kubernetes has been a quiet hit among cloud native users — many who are deploying to edge environs. So for this week’s episode of The New Stack Context podcast, we invited Rancher Co-Founder Darren Shepherd to discuss what Rancher is seeing in the cloud native ecosystem. Rancher is in the process of being acquired by SUSE and, because the deal is still pending, Darren could not comment but he did chat about K3s, as well as Kubernetes. The New Stack Editorial and Marketing Director Libby Clark hosted this episode, alongside TNS Senior Editor Richard MacManus, and TNS Managing Editor Joab Jackson.

30 min2 w ago
Comments
Episode 132: Darren Shepard of Rancher - Who Needs Kubernetes Operators Anyway?

Episode 131: in-Memory Computing Meets Cloud Native Computing

For this week’s episode, we spoke with Mike Yawn, a senior solution architect at Hazelcast, about the potential of in-memory computing to supercharge microservices and cloud native workloads. Yawn recently contributed a post to TNS explaining how an in-memory technologies could make microservices run more smoothly. Hazelcast offers an in-memory data grid, Hazelcast IMDG, along with stream processing software Hazelcast Jet. We wanted to know more about how in-memory could be used with microservices. While in-memory offers caching just like key-value database such as Redis, it also offers additional computing capacity, which can help process that data on the fly, Yawn explained.

32 min3 w ago
Comments
Episode 131: in-Memory Computing Meets Cloud Native Computing

Episode 130: KubeCon EU and the Zombie Workloads

Welcome to The New Stack Context, a podcast where we discuss the latest news and perspectives in the world of cloud native computing. For this week’s episode, we spoke with Pratik Wadher, vice president of product development at Intuit, to discuss the company’s experience as a Kubernetes end user, as well as its involvement in the Argo Flux project — a single toolchain for continuous deployment and automated workflows using GitOps. We also share our experiences of attending KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU 2020, held this week “virtually.” The New Stack editorial and marketing director Libby Clark hosted this episode, alongside TNS Publisher Alex Williams, TNS senior editor Richard MacManus, and TNS managing editor Joab Jackson.

38 minAUG 22
Comments
Episode 130: KubeCon EU and the Zombie Workloads

Episode 129 : Kubernetes 2020, by the Numbers

The New Stack has just released an updated eBook on Kubernetes, “The State of the Kubernetes Ecosystem,” and so this week on The New Stack Context podcast, we’ve invited TNS analyst Lawrence Hecht to discuss some of the analysis he did for this volume. We covered Kubernetes adoption in the cloud, storage and networking concerns and the changing DevOps culture around cloud native computing. At the end of the podcast, we also discuss what to expect from next week’s KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe virtual conference. The New Stack Senior Editor Richard MacManus hosted this episode, with the help of Joab Jackson, TNS managing editor, and Alex Williams, founder and publisher of The New Stack.

38 minAUG 15
Comments
Episode 129 : Kubernetes 2020, by the Numbers

Episode 128: Operators Can Be a Security Hazard

A few years back, Kubernetes was in full development and many of its basic concepts were still evolving, so security was not a huge priority. But as K8s deployments have moved into production, more attention is being focused in securing Kubernetes and its workloads. Gadi Naor has been following Kubernetes security from the start. Alcide, the company Naor founded and now serves as CTO, offers an end-to-end Kubernetes security platform. For this week’s episode of The New Stack Context podcast, we speak with Naor about a variety of Kubernetes security-related topics. Last week, Naor hosted a Kubernetes security Webinar for the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, which in addition to offering many helpful hints, discussed in detail the spate of recent vulnerabilities found in Kubernetes. And for The New Stack, he wrote about the problem about configuration drift in Kubernetes, and why it can’t be solved simply through continuous integration tools. TNS Editorial and Marketing director Libby Clark hosted this episode, alongside TNS Senior Editor Richard MacManus, and TNS Managing Editor Joab Jackson.

35 minAUG 1
Comments
Episode 128: Operators Can Be a Security Hazard

Episode 127: Serverless Web Content Delivery with JAMstack

There is a new architecture for front-end web development: JAMStack rethinks the current server-browser architecture, freeing the developer from worrying about fiddling with Apache, Linux or other aspects of backend support. For this week’s episode of the The New Stack Context podcast, we speak with Guillermo Rauch, founder and CEO of Vercel, which offers a JAMstack-based service that allows developers to simply push their code to git in order to update their web site or application. Key to this platform is an open source user interface framework created by Rauch, called Next.js, based on Facebook’s React, but tweaked to make it easier to build user interfaces not only for the developer but even for the designer. TNS Editorial and Marketing Director Libby Clark hosted this episode, alongside TNS Senior Editor Richard MacManus, and TNS Managing Editor Joab Jackson. On the benefit of using a managed JAMstack such as Vercel’s (over a traditional LAMP stack), Rauch noted that: You can deploy to an essentially serverless infrastructure, right? I always tell people that content delivery networks were the OG serverless — because they never required management. They were perfectly delegated. It’s a globally distributed system with no single point of failure. You’re not going to have to worry about Linux and Apache because you can deploy to any distributed global network that can serve essentially markup, JavaScript, CSS and static files. Then obviously to power the API, server rendering and more advanced functionality, the Vercel network gives you serverless functions. So we try to complete the entire JAMstack equation.

41 minJUL 25
Comments
Episode 127: Serverless Web Content Delivery with JAMstack

Episode 126: Denise Gosnell, DataStax - How Many Database Joins Are Too Many?

Welcome to The New Stack Context, a podcast where we discuss the latest news and perspectives in the world of cloud native computing. For this week’s episode, we spoke with Denise Gosnell, chief data officer at Datastax, who is a co-author of the O’Reilly book “A Practitioner’s Guide to Graph Data.” She also graciously wrote a post for us explaining why graph databases are gaining traction in the enterprise. TNS editorial and marketing director Libby Clark hosted this episode, alongside TNS senior editor Richard MacManus, and TNS managing editor Joab Jackson. Graph database systems differ from the standard relational (SQL) kind in that they are engineered to more easily capture the relations across different entities. “When you’re looking at your databases, graph databases allow you to model your data more efficiently by using relationships,” Gosnell said. You could capture that relationship information through a series of database joins of separate tables, but eventually, t...

33 minJUL 18
Comments
Episode 126: Denise Gosnell, DataStax - How Many Database Joins Are Too Many?

Episode 125: Chris DiBona - Google Launches a Trademark Office for Open Source

Welcome to The New Stack Context, a podcast where we discuss the latest news and perspectives in the world of cloud native computing. For this week’s episode, we spoke with Chris DiBona, director of open source at Google, about Google’s launch of the Open Usage Commons, an independent company to help open source projects better manage their trademarks. In a blog post, DiBona notes that trademarks sit at the juncture of the rule-of-law and the philosophy of open source. So for this episode, we wanted to find out more about how they interact and how Google is attempting to improve the management of trademarks in an open source way. We also wanted to address the rumors that this organization was created to manage Google’s Istio open source service mesh in lieu of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (DiBona’s answer: no). TNS editorial and marketing director Libby Clark hosted this episode, alongside TNS senior editor Richard MacManus, and TNS managing editor Joab Jackson.

32 minJUL 11
Comments
Episode 125: Chris DiBona - Google Launches a Trademark Office for Open Source
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