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New Books in Literature

Marshall Poe

93
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108
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New Books in Literature

New Books in Literature

Marshall Poe

93
Followers
108
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

Interviews with Writers about their New Books

Latest Episodes

Elsa Hart, "The Cabinets of Barnaby Mayne" (Minotaur Books, 2020)

Lady Cecily Kay has just returned to England when she encounters Sir Barnaby Mayne. It’s 1703, Queen Anne is on the throne, and London’s coffee houses are buzzing with discussions of everything from science and philosophy to monsters and magic. Of course, Cecily has no plans to join the ongoing conversations; coffee houses bar the door to female visitors, however intelligent and learned. But she has secured something better: an entrée to the house of the city’s most influential collector, where she can compare her list of previously unknown plants to his rooms filled with specimens and, with luck, identify them. On Cecily’s first day in the Mayne house, however, Sir Barnaby is stabbed to death. His meek curator confesses to the crime, and even the victim’s widow seems willing to ignore any discrepancies in the evidence. With assistance from her childhood friend Meacan Barlow, an illustrator also living in Sir Barnaby’s house, Cecily sets out to tie up the loose ends on a murder that far too many people would prefer to remain unsolved. Her quest leads her into the shadowy world of London’s collectors, who will stop at nothing to cut out the competition and have no qualms about silencing a pair of nosy women who are coming too close to the truth. In The Cabinets of Barnaby Mayne (Minotaur Books, 2020), Elsa Hartthe author of the famed Li Du novels, here brings her talent for spinning a great yarn and crafting a compelling mystery to a new place, which—as you will learn in the interview—is in fact her original literary destination, attained at last. C. P. Lesley is the author of ten novels, including Legends of the Five Directions, a historical fiction series set during the childhood of Ivan the Terrible. Her latest book, Song of the Shaman, appeared in 2020. Find out more about her at http://www.cplesley.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

36 MIN5 h ago
Comments
Elsa Hart, "The Cabinets of Barnaby Mayne" (Minotaur Books, 2020)

Edward A. Farmer, "Pale: A Novel" (Blackstone, 2020)

It’s 1966, and Bernice’s husband has either died or abandoned her. Her brother Floyd invites her to join him as a servant working for white owners of an old plantation house in Mississippi. Floyd warns Bernice about the housekeeper, Silva, who lives there with her two young sons. The owner and his wife don’t speak much and there seem to be secrets hidden in every corner. The Mister works, fishes, reads the paper, and eats. When the Missus, a sickly, vindictive woman, sets her plan in motion, Bernice tries to mitigate the pain that will reverberate through everyone involved. In his novel Pale (Blackstone, 2020), Farmer tells a slowly bubbling, heartbreaking story that shows a household infected by the scourges of jealousy and vengeance. Edward A. Farmer is a native of Memphis, Tennessee where he journaled and cultivated stories his entire childhood. He is a graduate of Amherst College with a degree in English and Psychology, and recipient of the MacArthur-Leithauser Travel Award f...

29 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Edward A. Farmer, "Pale: A Novel" (Blackstone, 2020)

Premee Mohamed, "Beneath the Rising" (Solaris, 2020)

Premee Mohamed’s debut novel, Beneath the Rising (Solaris, 2020) came out in March, but don’t call her a new writer. “I find it funny that people refer to people who have just started to get published as new writers. I finished my first novel when I was 12. I'm not a new writer. What I am is new to publishing, and it's so weird to me that people conflate the two, as if you just started writing at the moment you started getting published,” Mohamed says. She’d completed the first draft of Beneath the Rising in 2002, around the time she’d received her undergraduate degree in molecular genetics, but it wasn’t until 2015 that she decided to try and publish it. Until then, writing was “very much my private little hobby.” Beneath the Rising combines horror, science fiction and fantasy in its portrayal of the complicated friendship of Nick and Joanna (Johnny). They’d been close since they were young children despite many differences (she’s a rich, white, world-famous scientist; h...

32 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Premee Mohamed, "Beneath the Rising" (Solaris, 2020)

Erika Rummel, "The Road to Gesualdo" (D. X. Varos, 2020)

The Italian Renaissance introduced—or reintroduced—many valuable concepts to society and culture, giving rise eventually to our modern world. But it was also a time of fierce political infighting, social inequality, the subjugation of women, religious intolerance, belief in witchcraft, and many other elements that are more fun to read about than to experience. In The Road to Gesualdo, Erika Rummel draws on her years as a historian of the sixteenth century to bring this captivating story to life. When Leonora d’Este, the daughter of the powerful family running the Italian city-state of Ferrara, receives orders from her brother to marry Prince Carlo of Gesualdo, she accepts the arranged match without protest. Her lady-in-waiting, Livia Prevera, does not. Prince Carlo, Livia argues, must have a secret, because the courtiers of Ferrara get quiet whenever his name comes up. Only after the wedding ceremony does Leonora discover that Livia is right. Prince Carlo murdered his first wife ...

34 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Erika Rummel, "The Road to Gesualdo" (D. X. Varos, 2020)

Bill LeFurgy, "Into the Suffering City: A Novel of Baltimore"(High Kicker Books, 2020)

In Bill LeFurgy's Into the Suffering City: A Novel of Baltimore(High Kicker Books), Sarah Kennecott is a brilliant young doctor who cares deeply about justice for murder victims after her own family is murdered. She’s not like other people; she doesn’t like noises and smells, she doesn’t understand chit chat, and she cannot interpret inflection or nuance. It’s 1909, and the city of Baltimore is filled with gilded mansions and a seedy corrupt, underworld. Sarah struggles to be accepted as a doctor. After getting fired for looking too closely into the killing of a showgirl, she refuses to back down from the investigation and joins forces with a street-smart private detective who is able to access saloons, brothels, and burlesque theaters where Sarah isn’t allowed. Together, they unravel a few secrets that could cost them their lives. Bill LeFurgy is a professional historian who has studied the seamy underbelly of urban life, including drugs, crime, and prostitution, as well as mo...

38 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Bill LeFurgy, "Into the Suffering City: A Novel of Baltimore"(High Kicker Books, 2020)

Chelsea Wagenaar, "The Spinning Place" (Southern Indiana Review Press, 2019)

In The Spinning Place (Southern Indiana Review Press, 2019), Chelsea Wagenaar explores the power of language—in terms of its possibilities and what it fails to express. As a being with a body in the world, there are so many experiences that are inexpressible. These poems attempt to touch upon those experiences, relating what it means to have a body, one that carries so many things, from children in the womb to the emotional weight of our relationship to others and the world around us. As Wagenaar lyrically examines everyday moments, her words reach for an ecstatic experience of the sacred. Moon-sliced star-pocked streetlit bleat, coal train moving like its own ghost along the tracks. 2:00, 3:00, my shadow sways as I catch myself, hand on the wall, pulled from bed by your nocturnal haunt, you at your crib rail, blanket clutched, more sound than body. —from “Night Shift” Chelsea Wagenaar is the author of two collections of poetry, most recently The Spinning Place was winner of the...

38 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Chelsea Wagenaar, "The Spinning Place" (Southern Indiana Review Press, 2019)

Nancy Thayer, "Girls of Summer: A Novel" (Ballantine Books, 2020)

Christina Gessler talks with her friend Nancy Thayer about Girls of Summer: A Novel (Ballantine Books), which was just chosen for O Magazine’s Summer Reading List. Girls of Summer is set during one life-changing summer on Nantucket, which brings about exhilarating revelations for a single mother and her two grown children in this sensational novel fromNew York Timesbestsellingauthor Nancy Thayer. Lisa Hawley is perfectly satisfied living on her own. Having fully recovered from a brutal divorce nearly two decades earlier, she has successfully raised her kids, Juliet and Theo, seeing them off to college and beyond. As the owner of a popular boutique on Nantucket, she’s built a fulfilling life for herself on the island where she grew up. With her beloved house in desperate need of repair, Lisa calls on Mack Whitney, a friendly—and very handsome—local contractor and fellow single parent, to do the work. The two begin to grow close, and Lisa is stunned to realize that she might be wi...

65 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Nancy Thayer, "Girls of Summer: A Novel" (Ballantine Books, 2020)

Chanelle Benz, "The Gone Dead" (Ecco, 2019)

A decrepit house in Greendale, Mississippi once belonged to Billie James’s father, a renowned black poet who died unexpectedly when she was four years old. Her mother dies of cancer. Then years later, her paternal grandmother dies and leaves Billie the old Mississippi Delta house. At age 34, Billie returns to the house, encounters the locals, and learns that on the day her father died, she went missing. She doesn’t want to leave Mississippi until she finds out what happened, but someone doesn’t want Billie to know the truth. Told from several perspectives, The Gone Dead (Ecco, 2019) is a story about family and memory, justice for those who were never given a chance, and some of the wounds caused by racism in America. Chanelle Benz has published work inGuernica, Granta.com, The New York Times,Electric Literature,The American Reader,Fenceand others, and is the recipient of an O. Henry Prize. Her story collectionThe Man Who Shot Out My Eye Is Deadwas named a Best Book of 2017 byThe ...

38 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Chanelle Benz, "The Gone Dead" (Ecco, 2019)

Suri Hustvedt, "Memories of the Future" (Simon and Schuster, 2019)

How Do We Write Our Personal History at the Same Time That It’s Written for Us? Today I talked to Suri Hustvedt about this question and others as we discuss her book Memories of the Future (Simon and Schuster, 2019). The Literary Review (UK) has called Hustvedt “a twenty-first-century Virginia Woolf.” She’s the author of seven novels, four collections of essays, and two works of nonfiction. She has a PhD in English literature from Columbia University and lectures in psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College. Hustvedt is the recipient of numerous awards, including the European Essay Prize. Topics covered in this episode include: What it can mean to be a heroine instead of a hero, including in regards to which emotions might conventionally be considered “off-limits.” The role that the author’s over-a-dozen drawings play in this novel. Musings on what the roots of ambition might be, and how ambition and shame as well as memory and imagination are often so intertwined. Dan Hill...

43 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Suri Hustvedt, "Memories of the Future" (Simon and Schuster, 2019)

Jessica Winters Mireles, "Lost in Oaxaca" (She Writes Press, 2020)

After an injury to her hand derails her promising concert career, Camille retreats to her mother’s house and teaches piano to mostly desultory students. The years pass, and she finds Graciela, the talented daughter of her mother’s Mexican housekeeper, and Camille focuses on preparing her to live the life she herself was unable to live. Graciela has just won a prestigious piano competition and the chance to jump start her career, but two weeks before she’s supposed to perform with the LA Philharmonic, she disappears. Camille is determined to find her and bring her back before she squanders the opportunity of a lifetime, but a bus accident on route to Graciela’s family village outside of Oaxaca leaves her alone, unable to speak the indigenous language, and without a passport, money, or clothes. Camille, who grew up privileged, finally starts to learn just what it really means to be hungry. Born and raised in Santa Barbara, California, Jessica Winters Mireles holds a degree in pian...

29 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Jessica Winters Mireles, "Lost in Oaxaca" (She Writes Press, 2020)

Latest Episodes

Elsa Hart, "The Cabinets of Barnaby Mayne" (Minotaur Books, 2020)

Lady Cecily Kay has just returned to England when she encounters Sir Barnaby Mayne. It’s 1703, Queen Anne is on the throne, and London’s coffee houses are buzzing with discussions of everything from science and philosophy to monsters and magic. Of course, Cecily has no plans to join the ongoing conversations; coffee houses bar the door to female visitors, however intelligent and learned. But she has secured something better: an entrée to the house of the city’s most influential collector, where she can compare her list of previously unknown plants to his rooms filled with specimens and, with luck, identify them. On Cecily’s first day in the Mayne house, however, Sir Barnaby is stabbed to death. His meek curator confesses to the crime, and even the victim’s widow seems willing to ignore any discrepancies in the evidence. With assistance from her childhood friend Meacan Barlow, an illustrator also living in Sir Barnaby’s house, Cecily sets out to tie up the loose ends on a murder that far too many people would prefer to remain unsolved. Her quest leads her into the shadowy world of London’s collectors, who will stop at nothing to cut out the competition and have no qualms about silencing a pair of nosy women who are coming too close to the truth. In The Cabinets of Barnaby Mayne (Minotaur Books, 2020), Elsa Hartthe author of the famed Li Du novels, here brings her talent for spinning a great yarn and crafting a compelling mystery to a new place, which—as you will learn in the interview—is in fact her original literary destination, attained at last. C. P. Lesley is the author of ten novels, including Legends of the Five Directions, a historical fiction series set during the childhood of Ivan the Terrible. Her latest book, Song of the Shaman, appeared in 2020. Find out more about her at http://www.cplesley.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

36 MIN5 h ago
Comments
Elsa Hart, "The Cabinets of Barnaby Mayne" (Minotaur Books, 2020)

Edward A. Farmer, "Pale: A Novel" (Blackstone, 2020)

It’s 1966, and Bernice’s husband has either died or abandoned her. Her brother Floyd invites her to join him as a servant working for white owners of an old plantation house in Mississippi. Floyd warns Bernice about the housekeeper, Silva, who lives there with her two young sons. The owner and his wife don’t speak much and there seem to be secrets hidden in every corner. The Mister works, fishes, reads the paper, and eats. When the Missus, a sickly, vindictive woman, sets her plan in motion, Bernice tries to mitigate the pain that will reverberate through everyone involved. In his novel Pale (Blackstone, 2020), Farmer tells a slowly bubbling, heartbreaking story that shows a household infected by the scourges of jealousy and vengeance. Edward A. Farmer is a native of Memphis, Tennessee where he journaled and cultivated stories his entire childhood. He is a graduate of Amherst College with a degree in English and Psychology, and recipient of the MacArthur-Leithauser Travel Award f...

29 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Edward A. Farmer, "Pale: A Novel" (Blackstone, 2020)

Premee Mohamed, "Beneath the Rising" (Solaris, 2020)

Premee Mohamed’s debut novel, Beneath the Rising (Solaris, 2020) came out in March, but don’t call her a new writer. “I find it funny that people refer to people who have just started to get published as new writers. I finished my first novel when I was 12. I'm not a new writer. What I am is new to publishing, and it's so weird to me that people conflate the two, as if you just started writing at the moment you started getting published,” Mohamed says. She’d completed the first draft of Beneath the Rising in 2002, around the time she’d received her undergraduate degree in molecular genetics, but it wasn’t until 2015 that she decided to try and publish it. Until then, writing was “very much my private little hobby.” Beneath the Rising combines horror, science fiction and fantasy in its portrayal of the complicated friendship of Nick and Joanna (Johnny). They’d been close since they were young children despite many differences (she’s a rich, white, world-famous scientist; h...

32 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Premee Mohamed, "Beneath the Rising" (Solaris, 2020)

Erika Rummel, "The Road to Gesualdo" (D. X. Varos, 2020)

The Italian Renaissance introduced—or reintroduced—many valuable concepts to society and culture, giving rise eventually to our modern world. But it was also a time of fierce political infighting, social inequality, the subjugation of women, religious intolerance, belief in witchcraft, and many other elements that are more fun to read about than to experience. In The Road to Gesualdo, Erika Rummel draws on her years as a historian of the sixteenth century to bring this captivating story to life. When Leonora d’Este, the daughter of the powerful family running the Italian city-state of Ferrara, receives orders from her brother to marry Prince Carlo of Gesualdo, she accepts the arranged match without protest. Her lady-in-waiting, Livia Prevera, does not. Prince Carlo, Livia argues, must have a secret, because the courtiers of Ferrara get quiet whenever his name comes up. Only after the wedding ceremony does Leonora discover that Livia is right. Prince Carlo murdered his first wife ...

34 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Erika Rummel, "The Road to Gesualdo" (D. X. Varos, 2020)

Bill LeFurgy, "Into the Suffering City: A Novel of Baltimore"(High Kicker Books, 2020)

In Bill LeFurgy's Into the Suffering City: A Novel of Baltimore(High Kicker Books), Sarah Kennecott is a brilliant young doctor who cares deeply about justice for murder victims after her own family is murdered. She’s not like other people; she doesn’t like noises and smells, she doesn’t understand chit chat, and she cannot interpret inflection or nuance. It’s 1909, and the city of Baltimore is filled with gilded mansions and a seedy corrupt, underworld. Sarah struggles to be accepted as a doctor. After getting fired for looking too closely into the killing of a showgirl, she refuses to back down from the investigation and joins forces with a street-smart private detective who is able to access saloons, brothels, and burlesque theaters where Sarah isn’t allowed. Together, they unravel a few secrets that could cost them their lives. Bill LeFurgy is a professional historian who has studied the seamy underbelly of urban life, including drugs, crime, and prostitution, as well as mo...

38 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Bill LeFurgy, "Into the Suffering City: A Novel of Baltimore"(High Kicker Books, 2020)

Chelsea Wagenaar, "The Spinning Place" (Southern Indiana Review Press, 2019)

In The Spinning Place (Southern Indiana Review Press, 2019), Chelsea Wagenaar explores the power of language—in terms of its possibilities and what it fails to express. As a being with a body in the world, there are so many experiences that are inexpressible. These poems attempt to touch upon those experiences, relating what it means to have a body, one that carries so many things, from children in the womb to the emotional weight of our relationship to others and the world around us. As Wagenaar lyrically examines everyday moments, her words reach for an ecstatic experience of the sacred. Moon-sliced star-pocked streetlit bleat, coal train moving like its own ghost along the tracks. 2:00, 3:00, my shadow sways as I catch myself, hand on the wall, pulled from bed by your nocturnal haunt, you at your crib rail, blanket clutched, more sound than body. —from “Night Shift” Chelsea Wagenaar is the author of two collections of poetry, most recently The Spinning Place was winner of the...

38 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Chelsea Wagenaar, "The Spinning Place" (Southern Indiana Review Press, 2019)

Nancy Thayer, "Girls of Summer: A Novel" (Ballantine Books, 2020)

Christina Gessler talks with her friend Nancy Thayer about Girls of Summer: A Novel (Ballantine Books), which was just chosen for O Magazine’s Summer Reading List. Girls of Summer is set during one life-changing summer on Nantucket, which brings about exhilarating revelations for a single mother and her two grown children in this sensational novel fromNew York Timesbestsellingauthor Nancy Thayer. Lisa Hawley is perfectly satisfied living on her own. Having fully recovered from a brutal divorce nearly two decades earlier, she has successfully raised her kids, Juliet and Theo, seeing them off to college and beyond. As the owner of a popular boutique on Nantucket, she’s built a fulfilling life for herself on the island where she grew up. With her beloved house in desperate need of repair, Lisa calls on Mack Whitney, a friendly—and very handsome—local contractor and fellow single parent, to do the work. The two begin to grow close, and Lisa is stunned to realize that she might be wi...

65 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Nancy Thayer, "Girls of Summer: A Novel" (Ballantine Books, 2020)

Chanelle Benz, "The Gone Dead" (Ecco, 2019)

A decrepit house in Greendale, Mississippi once belonged to Billie James’s father, a renowned black poet who died unexpectedly when she was four years old. Her mother dies of cancer. Then years later, her paternal grandmother dies and leaves Billie the old Mississippi Delta house. At age 34, Billie returns to the house, encounters the locals, and learns that on the day her father died, she went missing. She doesn’t want to leave Mississippi until she finds out what happened, but someone doesn’t want Billie to know the truth. Told from several perspectives, The Gone Dead (Ecco, 2019) is a story about family and memory, justice for those who were never given a chance, and some of the wounds caused by racism in America. Chanelle Benz has published work inGuernica, Granta.com, The New York Times,Electric Literature,The American Reader,Fenceand others, and is the recipient of an O. Henry Prize. Her story collectionThe Man Who Shot Out My Eye Is Deadwas named a Best Book of 2017 byThe ...

38 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Chanelle Benz, "The Gone Dead" (Ecco, 2019)

Suri Hustvedt, "Memories of the Future" (Simon and Schuster, 2019)

How Do We Write Our Personal History at the Same Time That It’s Written for Us? Today I talked to Suri Hustvedt about this question and others as we discuss her book Memories of the Future (Simon and Schuster, 2019). The Literary Review (UK) has called Hustvedt “a twenty-first-century Virginia Woolf.” She’s the author of seven novels, four collections of essays, and two works of nonfiction. She has a PhD in English literature from Columbia University and lectures in psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College. Hustvedt is the recipient of numerous awards, including the European Essay Prize. Topics covered in this episode include: What it can mean to be a heroine instead of a hero, including in regards to which emotions might conventionally be considered “off-limits.” The role that the author’s over-a-dozen drawings play in this novel. Musings on what the roots of ambition might be, and how ambition and shame as well as memory and imagination are often so intertwined. Dan Hill...

43 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Suri Hustvedt, "Memories of the Future" (Simon and Schuster, 2019)

Jessica Winters Mireles, "Lost in Oaxaca" (She Writes Press, 2020)

After an injury to her hand derails her promising concert career, Camille retreats to her mother’s house and teaches piano to mostly desultory students. The years pass, and she finds Graciela, the talented daughter of her mother’s Mexican housekeeper, and Camille focuses on preparing her to live the life she herself was unable to live. Graciela has just won a prestigious piano competition and the chance to jump start her career, but two weeks before she’s supposed to perform with the LA Philharmonic, she disappears. Camille is determined to find her and bring her back before she squanders the opportunity of a lifetime, but a bus accident on route to Graciela’s family village outside of Oaxaca leaves her alone, unable to speak the indigenous language, and without a passport, money, or clothes. Camille, who grew up privileged, finally starts to learn just what it really means to be hungry. Born and raised in Santa Barbara, California, Jessica Winters Mireles holds a degree in pian...

29 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Jessica Winters Mireles, "Lost in Oaxaca" (She Writes Press, 2020)
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