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New Books in Literature

Marshall Poe

41
Followers
17
Plays
New Books in Literature

New Books in Literature

Marshall Poe

41
Followers
17
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

Interviews with Writers about their New Books

Latest Episodes

Sarah Knott, "Mother is a Verb: An Unconventional History" (Penguin, 2020)

Mothering is as old as human existence. But how has this most essential experience changed over time and cultures? What is the history of maternity—the history of pregnancy, birth, the encounter with an infant? In Mother Is a Verb: An Unconventional History (Sarah Crichton Books, 2020), Sarah Knott creates a genre all her own in order to craft a new kind of historical interpretation. Blending memoir and history and building from anecdote, her book brings the past and the present viscerally alive. As a history, Mother: An Unconventional Historydraws on the terrain of Britain and North America from the seventeenth century to the close of the twentieth. Knott searches among a range of past societies, from those of Cree and Ojibwe women to tenant farmers in Appalachia; from enslaved people on South Carolina rice plantations to tenement dwellers in New York City and London’s East End. She pores over diaries, letters, court records, medical manuals, items of clothing. And she explores and documents her own experiences. Dr. Julia M. Gossard is assistant professor of history and distinguished assistant professor of honor’s education at Utah State University. A historian of 18th-century France, Julia’s manuscript, Young Subjects: Childhood, State-Building, & Social Reform in the 18th-century French World (forthcoming, McGill-Queen’s UP), examines children as important actors in social reform, state-building, and imperial projects across the early modern French world. Dr. Gossard is active on Twitter. To learn more about her teaching, research, and experience in digital humanities, visit her website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

40 MIN1 d ago
Comments
Sarah Knott, "Mother is a Verb: An Unconventional History" (Penguin, 2020)

Will Thomas, "Lethal Pursuit" (Minotaur, 2019)

London, 1892. Private enquiry agents Cyrus Barker and Thomas Llewelyn have been tasked by the Prime Minister to deliver a satchel to the Vatican. The satchel contains a document desperately desired by the German government, an unnamed first-century gospel. With secret societies, government assassins, political groups, and shadowy figures of all sorts doing everything they can to acquire the satchel and its contents—attacks, murders, counterattacks, even massive street battles, and with a cold war brewing between England and Germany—this small task might be beyond even the prodigious talents of Cyrus Barker. Join us, as we speak with author Will Thomas about his recent book, Lethal Pursuit, the eleventh historical mystery novel in the Barker & Llewelyn series. Will Thomas is the author of the Cyrus Barker and Thomas Llewelyn series, which includes Blood is Blood, Old Scores, Hell Bay, and the Shamus and Barry Award-nominated Some Danger Involved. He lives with his family in Oklahoma. Michael Morales is Professor of Biblical Studies at Greenville Seminary, and the author of Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?(2015) and Exodus Old and New (2020). He can be reached at mmorales@gpts.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

30 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Will Thomas, "Lethal Pursuit" (Minotaur, 2019)

Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, "The Age of Phillis" (Wesleyan UP, 2020)

Jennifer J. Davis speaks with Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, Professor of English at the University of Oklahoma, about The Age of Phillis (Wesleyan UP, 2020), Jeffers’s latest collection of poems centered on the remarkable life of America’s first poet of African descent, Phillis Wheatley Peters. The Society of Early Americanists recently selected The Age of Phillis as the subject for their Common Reading Initiative for 2021. Prof. Jeffers has published four additional volumes of poetry including The Glory Gets and The Gospel of Barbecue, and alongside fiction and critical essays. She lives in Norman, Oklahoma. In The Age of Phillis, Jeffers draws on fifteen years of research in archives and locations across America, Europe and Africa to envision the world of Phillis Wheatley Peters : from the daily rhythms of her childhood in Senegambia, the trauma of her capture and transatlantic transport, to the icy port of Boston where she was enslaved and educated. In our conversation, Jeffers speaks to the origins of this project, reveals how she embarked on the research and writing process, and shares a few powerful poems from the volume. Jennifer J. Davis is Associate Professor of History and Women’s & Gender Studies at the University of Oklahoma, and the Co-Editor of the Journal of Women’s History. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

53 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, "The Age of Phillis" (Wesleyan UP, 2020)

Maggie Kast, "Side by Side but Never Face to Face" (Orison Books, 2020)

During the first few stories, we think the book centers on Manfred, an Austrian Holocaust survivor whose parents converted out of Judaism to save him from centuries of oppression. He and his third wife, Greta, are forced to mourn the accidental death of their youngest child, a trauma that affects them deeply but differently. Only after several stories focused on Manfred’s upbringing and young adulthood do we realize that the protagonist is his wife and then widow, Greta. Starting in Mexico, the stories shift back and forth in time and place, from Europe to Chicago to Door County, Wisconsin. We follow Greta’s emotional journey, spiritual longings, and religious awakening as she survives the complexities of a full life. Today I talked to Maggie Kastabout her new book Side by Side but Never Face to Face: A Novella and Stories (Orison Books, 2020) Kast received an M.F.A. in writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts and has published fiction in The Sun, Nimrod, Rosebud, Paper Streetand others. A chapter of her memoir, published inACM/Another Chicago Magazine, won a Literary Award from the Illinois Arts Council. Her essays have appeared inAmerica, Image, Writer’s Chronicle,andSuperstition Reviewand have been anthologized inLove You to Pieces: Creative Writers on Raising a Child with Special Needs(Beacon Press) andGravity Pulls You In: Perspectives on Parenting Children on the Autism Spectrum(Woodbine House). Kast is a Board Member ofLinks Hall, an incubator and presenter of dance and performance art in Chicago. When not writing, Maggie loves cooking, and although she loves traditional midwestern food, also specialized in Viennese cuisine. If you enjoyed today’s podcast and would like to discuss it further with me and other New Books network listeners, please join us on Shuffle. Shuffle is an ad-free, invite-only network focused on the creativity community. As NBN listeners, you can get special access to conversations with a dynamic community of writers and literary enthusiasts. Sign up by going towww.shuffle.do/NBN/join G.P. Gottlieb is the author of theWhipped and Sipped Mystery Seriesand a prolific baker of healthful breads and pastries. Please contact her through her website (GPGottlieb.com) if you wish to recommend an author (of a beautifully-written new novel) to interview, to listen to her previous podcast interviews, to read her mystery book reviews, or to check out some of her healthy, awesome recipes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

29 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Maggie Kast, "Side by Side but Never Face to Face" (Orison Books, 2020)

Crissy Van Meter, "Creatures: A Novel" (Algonquin Books, 2020)

Going back and forth in time, Evangeline (Evie) recalls the challenges of being raised on a lush island off the coast of California. Her mother has left Evie and her father, and her father raises Evie from the age of three. He’s a jack-of-all-trades but survives by selling a specially grown variety of marijuana. And although he provides her with adventure and a deep love of the ocean, Evie’s father doesn’t show up as a consistent adult in her life. The book opens just before her wedding, when a storm is brewing, her fiancé is out at sea, and a dead whale beaches, which causes a pervading smell of decay across the island. Evie’s mostly absent mother suddenly shows up wanting to participate in the joy of her daughter’s wedding. In flashbacks and musings, Evie confronts her abandonment, guilt, anger and ultimately her love for all creatures - including her parents, her husband, her best friend, and her best friend’s child. With sporadic notes from Evie’s research on wales and sea life, this is a novel to savor while either gazing out to sea or imagining it. Crissy Van Meter is a writer based in Los Angeles. Creatures: A Novel(Algonquin Books) is her debut novel.She teaches creative writing at The Writing Instituteat Sarah Lawrence College. She is the founder of the literary project Five Quarterlyand the managing editor for Nouvella Books. She serves on the board of directors for the literary non-profitNovelly. Crissy loves going to Disneyland and has been an annual passholder since she was 5. She’s been to Tokyo Disneyland, Disneyland Paris, Walt Disney World, and she plans to visit the remaining Disney parks in Hong Kong and Shanghai. If you enjoyed today’s podcast and would like to discuss it further with me and other New Books network listeners, please join us on Shuffle. Shuffle is an ad-free, invite-only network focused on the creativity community. As NBN listeners, you can get special access to conversations with a dynamic community of writers and literary enthusiasts. Sign up by going towww.shuffle.do/NBN/join G.P. Gottlieb is the author of theWhipped and Sipped Mystery Seriesand a prolific baker of healthful breads and pastries. Please contact her through her website (GPGottlieb.com) if you wish to recommend an author (of a beautifully-written new novel) to interview, to listen to her previous podcast interviews, to read her mystery book reviews, or to check out some of her awesome recipes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

28 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Crissy Van Meter, "Creatures: A Novel" (Algonquin Books, 2020)

Donna Hemans, "Tea by the Sea" (Red Hen Press, 2020)

A new father walks out of the hospital with his day-old baby while the mother recuperates from giving birth. He tells a series of lies and moves houses or countries whenever the truth gets too close. The young, broken-hearted mother devotes herself to searching for her missing daughter. Alternating between Jamaica and Brooklyn, NY, she is disappointed again and again, until seventeen years go by and she happens to see the photo of the man who took her baby. Now he is a priest. In beautiful, wrenching prose, Hemans' Tea by the Sea (Red Hen Press) tells an unforgettably moving story of family love, identity, and betrayal. Jamaican-born Donna Hemans is the author of the novels River Woman, winner of the 2003–4 Towson University Prize for Literature, and Tea by the Sea, forwhich she won the Lignum Vitae Una Marson Award for Adult Literature. Her short fiction and essays have appeared in the The Caribbean Writer, CrabOrchard Review, Witness, Electric Literature, Ms. Magazine, among othe...

50 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Donna Hemans, "Tea by the Sea" (Red Hen Press, 2020)

Sarah M. Sala, "Devil's Lake" (Tolsun Books, 2020)

Devil's Lake (Tolsun Books, 2020), the debut collection by Sarah Sala, is an amalgam of American life. The poems move deftly within a world that is equal parts dangerous, celebratory, subdued, modern, and rural. Sala uses format and form to bring the spotlight to American violence with just as much care as she does queerness. From the gentle retelling of a brutal murder to the capturing of memories beginning to fade from a grandmother's mind, Devil's Lake honors each of its topics. It is through the collection's three sections readers are invited to look not only at themselves, but each other for the threads that hold in that which makes us who we are. Sarah M. Sala is a poet, educator, and native of Michigan with degrees from the University of Michigan and New York University. She is the recipient of fellowships from Poets House, The Ashbery Home School, and Sundress Academy for the Arts. Her work appears in BOMB, Poetry Ireland Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, and The Southampton Review, among others. The founding director of Office Hours Poetry Workshop, and assistant poetry editor for the Bellevue Literary Review, she teaches expository writing at New York University and lives in Washington Heights with her wusband. Athena Dixon is a NE Ohio native, poet, essayist, and editor. Her essay collection, The Incredible Shrinking Woman, is forthcoming from Split/Lip Press (2020). Athena is also the author of No God in This Room, a poetry chapbook (Argus House Press). Her poetry is included in The BreakBeat Poets Vol. 2: Black Girl Magic (Haymarket Books). Learn more atwww.athenadixon.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

41 MIN5 d ago
Comments
Sarah M. Sala, "Devil's Lake" (Tolsun Books, 2020)

Barbara Monier, "The Rocky Orchard" (Amika Press, 2020)

Sitting on the porch swing at her family’s vacation house, Mazie sees an old woman cutting through the orchard across the way and offers her a glass of water. Before long, they are playing cards every morning, and Mazie, triggered by the place that holds many childhood memories, begins sharing stories with her new friend, Lula. As Mazie reveals more about her past, she begins to question how Lula happened to come into view that morning, and how she herself made her way back to the orchard. Today I talked to Barbara Monier about her new novel The Rocky Orchard (Amika Press, 2020).Monier studied writing at Yale University and the University of Michigan, but she has been writing since she could hold a chubby pencil. While at Michigan, she received the Avery and Jule Hopwood Prize. Before The Rocky Orchard’s release, her three previous novels are You, In Your Green Shirt, A Little Birdie Told Me , and Pushing the River. Ms. Monier lives in Chicago, where a breathtaking view of Lake Mi...

30 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Barbara Monier, "The Rocky Orchard" (Amika Press, 2020)

Kristin O’Donnell Tubb, "The Story Collector" (Henry Holt, 2018)

On this special kids-at-home episode of the New Books Network, Dr. Lee Pierce (s/t) interviews middle grade reader author Kristin O’Donnell Tubb about The Story Collector(Henry Holt, 2018),the first book in the New York Public Library series. The Story Collector is a middle-grade historical fiction book inspired by the real life of Viviani Fedeler. Joining the interview is a real-life 10 year old reader, Airlyin Washburn, sharing her favorite parts of the story and a book talk originally slated for the presentation at TomeCon 2020. Eleven-year-old Viviani Fedeler has spent her whole life in the New York Public Library. She knows every room by heart, except the ones her father keeps locked. When Viviani becomes convinced that the library is haunted, new girl Merit Mubarak makes fun of her. So Viviani decides to play a harmless little prank, roping her older brothers and best friend Eva to help out. But what begins as a joke quickly gets out of hand, and soon Viviani and her friends ...

42 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Kristin O’Donnell Tubb, "The Story Collector" (Henry Holt, 2018)

Eric LeMay, "Remember Me: An Essay" (CutBank 2020)

This, my first podcast for the New Books Network, was a hard one … but, a good one. Listen in, as I talk cancer, parenting, writing, and Shakespeare’s Hamlet with my former professor and mentor, author Eric LeMay about his new chapbook, Remember Me: An Essay (CutBank 2020). When I first read this beautiful gut-punch of an essay, where LeMay explores his relationship with his young son alongside his experience with a surprise cancer diagnosis, I was prompted by LeMay’s words to remember Hamlet crying out to the image of his father, saying: “Alas, poor ghost!” That father-ghost replying, “Pity me not, but lend thy serious hearing to what I shall unfold.” So, listeners, “lend thy serious hearing” as LeMay and I talk intimately about the desire to be remembered while simultaneously letting that remembering take place outside and away from the self that is happening now and now and now and now. Ellee Achten is a writer and editor exploring issues of home, health, memory, and attachment. She writes everything from magazine features to lyrical memoir to sci-fi novels. She is currently working on many projects, including a collection of essays about the traumatic connection between the body and mind. She can be reached at: elleeachten@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

62 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Eric LeMay, "Remember Me: An Essay" (CutBank 2020)

Latest Episodes

Sarah Knott, "Mother is a Verb: An Unconventional History" (Penguin, 2020)

Mothering is as old as human existence. But how has this most essential experience changed over time and cultures? What is the history of maternity—the history of pregnancy, birth, the encounter with an infant? In Mother Is a Verb: An Unconventional History (Sarah Crichton Books, 2020), Sarah Knott creates a genre all her own in order to craft a new kind of historical interpretation. Blending memoir and history and building from anecdote, her book brings the past and the present viscerally alive. As a history, Mother: An Unconventional Historydraws on the terrain of Britain and North America from the seventeenth century to the close of the twentieth. Knott searches among a range of past societies, from those of Cree and Ojibwe women to tenant farmers in Appalachia; from enslaved people on South Carolina rice plantations to tenement dwellers in New York City and London’s East End. She pores over diaries, letters, court records, medical manuals, items of clothing. And she explores and documents her own experiences. Dr. Julia M. Gossard is assistant professor of history and distinguished assistant professor of honor’s education at Utah State University. A historian of 18th-century France, Julia’s manuscript, Young Subjects: Childhood, State-Building, & Social Reform in the 18th-century French World (forthcoming, McGill-Queen’s UP), examines children as important actors in social reform, state-building, and imperial projects across the early modern French world. Dr. Gossard is active on Twitter. To learn more about her teaching, research, and experience in digital humanities, visit her website. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

40 MIN1 d ago
Comments
Sarah Knott, "Mother is a Verb: An Unconventional History" (Penguin, 2020)

Will Thomas, "Lethal Pursuit" (Minotaur, 2019)

London, 1892. Private enquiry agents Cyrus Barker and Thomas Llewelyn have been tasked by the Prime Minister to deliver a satchel to the Vatican. The satchel contains a document desperately desired by the German government, an unnamed first-century gospel. With secret societies, government assassins, political groups, and shadowy figures of all sorts doing everything they can to acquire the satchel and its contents—attacks, murders, counterattacks, even massive street battles, and with a cold war brewing between England and Germany—this small task might be beyond even the prodigious talents of Cyrus Barker. Join us, as we speak with author Will Thomas about his recent book, Lethal Pursuit, the eleventh historical mystery novel in the Barker & Llewelyn series. Will Thomas is the author of the Cyrus Barker and Thomas Llewelyn series, which includes Blood is Blood, Old Scores, Hell Bay, and the Shamus and Barry Award-nominated Some Danger Involved. He lives with his family in Oklahoma. Michael Morales is Professor of Biblical Studies at Greenville Seminary, and the author of Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?(2015) and Exodus Old and New (2020). He can be reached at mmorales@gpts.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

30 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Will Thomas, "Lethal Pursuit" (Minotaur, 2019)

Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, "The Age of Phillis" (Wesleyan UP, 2020)

Jennifer J. Davis speaks with Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, Professor of English at the University of Oklahoma, about The Age of Phillis (Wesleyan UP, 2020), Jeffers’s latest collection of poems centered on the remarkable life of America’s first poet of African descent, Phillis Wheatley Peters. The Society of Early Americanists recently selected The Age of Phillis as the subject for their Common Reading Initiative for 2021. Prof. Jeffers has published four additional volumes of poetry including The Glory Gets and The Gospel of Barbecue, and alongside fiction and critical essays. She lives in Norman, Oklahoma. In The Age of Phillis, Jeffers draws on fifteen years of research in archives and locations across America, Europe and Africa to envision the world of Phillis Wheatley Peters : from the daily rhythms of her childhood in Senegambia, the trauma of her capture and transatlantic transport, to the icy port of Boston where she was enslaved and educated. In our conversation, Jeffers speaks to the origins of this project, reveals how she embarked on the research and writing process, and shares a few powerful poems from the volume. Jennifer J. Davis is Associate Professor of History and Women’s & Gender Studies at the University of Oklahoma, and the Co-Editor of the Journal of Women’s History. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

53 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, "The Age of Phillis" (Wesleyan UP, 2020)

Maggie Kast, "Side by Side but Never Face to Face" (Orison Books, 2020)

During the first few stories, we think the book centers on Manfred, an Austrian Holocaust survivor whose parents converted out of Judaism to save him from centuries of oppression. He and his third wife, Greta, are forced to mourn the accidental death of their youngest child, a trauma that affects them deeply but differently. Only after several stories focused on Manfred’s upbringing and young adulthood do we realize that the protagonist is his wife and then widow, Greta. Starting in Mexico, the stories shift back and forth in time and place, from Europe to Chicago to Door County, Wisconsin. We follow Greta’s emotional journey, spiritual longings, and religious awakening as she survives the complexities of a full life. Today I talked to Maggie Kastabout her new book Side by Side but Never Face to Face: A Novella and Stories (Orison Books, 2020) Kast received an M.F.A. in writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts and has published fiction in The Sun, Nimrod, Rosebud, Paper Streetand others. A chapter of her memoir, published inACM/Another Chicago Magazine, won a Literary Award from the Illinois Arts Council. Her essays have appeared inAmerica, Image, Writer’s Chronicle,andSuperstition Reviewand have been anthologized inLove You to Pieces: Creative Writers on Raising a Child with Special Needs(Beacon Press) andGravity Pulls You In: Perspectives on Parenting Children on the Autism Spectrum(Woodbine House). Kast is a Board Member ofLinks Hall, an incubator and presenter of dance and performance art in Chicago. When not writing, Maggie loves cooking, and although she loves traditional midwestern food, also specialized in Viennese cuisine. If you enjoyed today’s podcast and would like to discuss it further with me and other New Books network listeners, please join us on Shuffle. Shuffle is an ad-free, invite-only network focused on the creativity community. As NBN listeners, you can get special access to conversations with a dynamic community of writers and literary enthusiasts. Sign up by going towww.shuffle.do/NBN/join G.P. Gottlieb is the author of theWhipped and Sipped Mystery Seriesand a prolific baker of healthful breads and pastries. Please contact her through her website (GPGottlieb.com) if you wish to recommend an author (of a beautifully-written new novel) to interview, to listen to her previous podcast interviews, to read her mystery book reviews, or to check out some of her healthy, awesome recipes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

29 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Maggie Kast, "Side by Side but Never Face to Face" (Orison Books, 2020)

Crissy Van Meter, "Creatures: A Novel" (Algonquin Books, 2020)

Going back and forth in time, Evangeline (Evie) recalls the challenges of being raised on a lush island off the coast of California. Her mother has left Evie and her father, and her father raises Evie from the age of three. He’s a jack-of-all-trades but survives by selling a specially grown variety of marijuana. And although he provides her with adventure and a deep love of the ocean, Evie’s father doesn’t show up as a consistent adult in her life. The book opens just before her wedding, when a storm is brewing, her fiancé is out at sea, and a dead whale beaches, which causes a pervading smell of decay across the island. Evie’s mostly absent mother suddenly shows up wanting to participate in the joy of her daughter’s wedding. In flashbacks and musings, Evie confronts her abandonment, guilt, anger and ultimately her love for all creatures - including her parents, her husband, her best friend, and her best friend’s child. With sporadic notes from Evie’s research on wales and sea life, this is a novel to savor while either gazing out to sea or imagining it. Crissy Van Meter is a writer based in Los Angeles. Creatures: A Novel(Algonquin Books) is her debut novel.She teaches creative writing at The Writing Instituteat Sarah Lawrence College. She is the founder of the literary project Five Quarterlyand the managing editor for Nouvella Books. She serves on the board of directors for the literary non-profitNovelly. Crissy loves going to Disneyland and has been an annual passholder since she was 5. She’s been to Tokyo Disneyland, Disneyland Paris, Walt Disney World, and she plans to visit the remaining Disney parks in Hong Kong and Shanghai. If you enjoyed today’s podcast and would like to discuss it further with me and other New Books network listeners, please join us on Shuffle. Shuffle is an ad-free, invite-only network focused on the creativity community. As NBN listeners, you can get special access to conversations with a dynamic community of writers and literary enthusiasts. Sign up by going towww.shuffle.do/NBN/join G.P. Gottlieb is the author of theWhipped and Sipped Mystery Seriesand a prolific baker of healthful breads and pastries. Please contact her through her website (GPGottlieb.com) if you wish to recommend an author (of a beautifully-written new novel) to interview, to listen to her previous podcast interviews, to read her mystery book reviews, or to check out some of her awesome recipes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

28 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Crissy Van Meter, "Creatures: A Novel" (Algonquin Books, 2020)

Donna Hemans, "Tea by the Sea" (Red Hen Press, 2020)

A new father walks out of the hospital with his day-old baby while the mother recuperates from giving birth. He tells a series of lies and moves houses or countries whenever the truth gets too close. The young, broken-hearted mother devotes herself to searching for her missing daughter. Alternating between Jamaica and Brooklyn, NY, she is disappointed again and again, until seventeen years go by and she happens to see the photo of the man who took her baby. Now he is a priest. In beautiful, wrenching prose, Hemans' Tea by the Sea (Red Hen Press) tells an unforgettably moving story of family love, identity, and betrayal. Jamaican-born Donna Hemans is the author of the novels River Woman, winner of the 2003–4 Towson University Prize for Literature, and Tea by the Sea, forwhich she won the Lignum Vitae Una Marson Award for Adult Literature. Her short fiction and essays have appeared in the The Caribbean Writer, CrabOrchard Review, Witness, Electric Literature, Ms. Magazine, among othe...

50 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Donna Hemans, "Tea by the Sea" (Red Hen Press, 2020)

Sarah M. Sala, "Devil's Lake" (Tolsun Books, 2020)

Devil's Lake (Tolsun Books, 2020), the debut collection by Sarah Sala, is an amalgam of American life. The poems move deftly within a world that is equal parts dangerous, celebratory, subdued, modern, and rural. Sala uses format and form to bring the spotlight to American violence with just as much care as she does queerness. From the gentle retelling of a brutal murder to the capturing of memories beginning to fade from a grandmother's mind, Devil's Lake honors each of its topics. It is through the collection's three sections readers are invited to look not only at themselves, but each other for the threads that hold in that which makes us who we are. Sarah M. Sala is a poet, educator, and native of Michigan with degrees from the University of Michigan and New York University. She is the recipient of fellowships from Poets House, The Ashbery Home School, and Sundress Academy for the Arts. Her work appears in BOMB, Poetry Ireland Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, and The Southampton Review, among others. The founding director of Office Hours Poetry Workshop, and assistant poetry editor for the Bellevue Literary Review, she teaches expository writing at New York University and lives in Washington Heights with her wusband. Athena Dixon is a NE Ohio native, poet, essayist, and editor. Her essay collection, The Incredible Shrinking Woman, is forthcoming from Split/Lip Press (2020). Athena is also the author of No God in This Room, a poetry chapbook (Argus House Press). Her poetry is included in The BreakBeat Poets Vol. 2: Black Girl Magic (Haymarket Books). Learn more atwww.athenadixon.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

41 MIN5 d ago
Comments
Sarah M. Sala, "Devil's Lake" (Tolsun Books, 2020)

Barbara Monier, "The Rocky Orchard" (Amika Press, 2020)

Sitting on the porch swing at her family’s vacation house, Mazie sees an old woman cutting through the orchard across the way and offers her a glass of water. Before long, they are playing cards every morning, and Mazie, triggered by the place that holds many childhood memories, begins sharing stories with her new friend, Lula. As Mazie reveals more about her past, she begins to question how Lula happened to come into view that morning, and how she herself made her way back to the orchard. Today I talked to Barbara Monier about her new novel The Rocky Orchard (Amika Press, 2020).Monier studied writing at Yale University and the University of Michigan, but she has been writing since she could hold a chubby pencil. While at Michigan, she received the Avery and Jule Hopwood Prize. Before The Rocky Orchard’s release, her three previous novels are You, In Your Green Shirt, A Little Birdie Told Me , and Pushing the River. Ms. Monier lives in Chicago, where a breathtaking view of Lake Mi...

30 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Barbara Monier, "The Rocky Orchard" (Amika Press, 2020)

Kristin O’Donnell Tubb, "The Story Collector" (Henry Holt, 2018)

On this special kids-at-home episode of the New Books Network, Dr. Lee Pierce (s/t) interviews middle grade reader author Kristin O’Donnell Tubb about The Story Collector(Henry Holt, 2018),the first book in the New York Public Library series. The Story Collector is a middle-grade historical fiction book inspired by the real life of Viviani Fedeler. Joining the interview is a real-life 10 year old reader, Airlyin Washburn, sharing her favorite parts of the story and a book talk originally slated for the presentation at TomeCon 2020. Eleven-year-old Viviani Fedeler has spent her whole life in the New York Public Library. She knows every room by heart, except the ones her father keeps locked. When Viviani becomes convinced that the library is haunted, new girl Merit Mubarak makes fun of her. So Viviani decides to play a harmless little prank, roping her older brothers and best friend Eva to help out. But what begins as a joke quickly gets out of hand, and soon Viviani and her friends ...

42 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Kristin O’Donnell Tubb, "The Story Collector" (Henry Holt, 2018)

Eric LeMay, "Remember Me: An Essay" (CutBank 2020)

This, my first podcast for the New Books Network, was a hard one … but, a good one. Listen in, as I talk cancer, parenting, writing, and Shakespeare’s Hamlet with my former professor and mentor, author Eric LeMay about his new chapbook, Remember Me: An Essay (CutBank 2020). When I first read this beautiful gut-punch of an essay, where LeMay explores his relationship with his young son alongside his experience with a surprise cancer diagnosis, I was prompted by LeMay’s words to remember Hamlet crying out to the image of his father, saying: “Alas, poor ghost!” That father-ghost replying, “Pity me not, but lend thy serious hearing to what I shall unfold.” So, listeners, “lend thy serious hearing” as LeMay and I talk intimately about the desire to be remembered while simultaneously letting that remembering take place outside and away from the self that is happening now and now and now and now. Ellee Achten is a writer and editor exploring issues of home, health, memory, and attachment. She writes everything from magazine features to lyrical memoir to sci-fi novels. She is currently working on many projects, including a collection of essays about the traumatic connection between the body and mind. She can be reached at: elleeachten@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

62 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Eric LeMay, "Remember Me: An Essay" (CutBank 2020)
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